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Urban economy
All the latest news, views and analysis on urban economy
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In the Climate Change Economy, It's About Efficiency, Not Just Growth

In the Climate Change Economy, It's About Efficiency, Not Just Growth | Urban economy | Scoop.it

North American cities are producing substantially less wealth per ton of greenhouse gas emissions than their European counterparts.


Research has shown that if you know a country's GDP, you can pretty accurately estimate its carbon emissions. There's "almost a mechanical relationship" between the two. And as a depressing corollary: Emissions rise much faster in good times than they fall during, say, a global recession.

Cities in some parts of the world are already doing a substantially better job at decoupling these two trends than others, wringing the most wealth out of the smallest carbon footprint. These are the cities that produce the greatest amount of GDP per ton of greenhouse gasses emitted.


The Carbon Disclosure Project, along with AECOM and the C40 Cities, have calculated this "economic efficiency" for dozens of global cities that participated in a questionnaire on how they are preparing for climate change...


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Cities: Drivers of Sustainable Human Development & Prosperity

Cities: Drivers of Sustainable Human Development & Prosperity | Urban economy | Scoop.it
As we plan for the future of our planet, it is imperative that we consider the effects of development on both the environment and human populations. A city is only truly sustainable if it uses natural resources efficiently while still fully meeting the needs of its inhabitants and a decent standard of living.

Recently, the UN Human Settlements Program (UN-HABITAT) launched its “State of the World’s Cities Report 2012/2013” which addresses the prosperity of cities. According to the report, the first step to achieving prosperity is to define the goal: What does prosperity mean in 2012? This is a difficult question to answer given the vast disparity of living conditions throughout the world. Additionally, it is imperative that the definition of prosperity today consider the needs of future generations. To this end, UN-Habitat developed a “City Prosperity Index,” which translates the five dimensions of prosperity identified by UN-Habitiat—productivity, infrastructure development, quality of life, equity and social inclusion, environmental sustainability—into measurable indicators (see page 15 of the report).


This definition of the prosperous city is consistent with the principles of a smart, sustainable and just city... further reading at the article link


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Anatomy of a Smart City

Anatomy of a Smart City | Urban economy | Scoop.it

The 19th century was a century of empires, 20th century was a century of nation states and the 21st century will be a century of cities...

This outstanding infographic (courtesy of postscapes.com) begins with some information about our current state of urbanization.

Did you know that 1.3 million people are moving to cities each week?! It then explains the need for smart cities and delves into what is required to establish these intelligent connected environments, how the smart city may take various forms in the developing worlds and what specific technologies are necessary to achieve such grand goals in practice.


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Eli Levine's curator insight, December 18, 2014 10:45 AM

There is an evolution taking place where politics, policy, technology, the environment, and the economy all intersect. This movement towards technical, empirically driven local policy making could be our saving grace.This could be the future of government.

Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, December 19, 2014 2:10 AM

A stunning infographic which predicts how urban living will change in this century.  Our age is truly becoming "a century of smart cities."  Exciting times lie ahead.  Aloha, Russ.

Paul Aneja - eTrends's curator insight, December 22, 2014 6:51 PM

What do you think makes a smarter city?

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Making Cities Better: The Scientific American Survey

Making Cities Better: The Scientific American Survey | Urban economy | Scoop.it

Scientific American asked opinion leaders from government, academia and the social network of our readers to answer a simple question:
What innovation (technological or otherwise) would make a city substantially more livable?

A selection of the most inspiring answers are printed in the September issue. Additional impressive replies, edited for brevity and clarity, also appear here.


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America's Best Performing Cities

America's Best Performing Cities | Urban economy | Scoop.it

Ideas, talent, skills, and density remain key contributors to the growth of America's metros.


Why do some cites and metros grow faster and better than others? It's a subject of considerable debate. Some say growth is a product of innovation and productivity  and others counter that growth is powered more by resources, home-building and extractive industries. Sometimes debates like these need a referee.

That's where a new report on America's "Best-Performing Cities" released this year by the Milken Institute comes in. The Institute's "Best-Performing Cities index" is a comprehensive and objective metric of metro economic performance and represents an outcomes-based accounting of short and long-term changes in economic output, high-tech industry, jobs, and wages.


Read the complete article for details on the rankings for large metros. Four of the top five metros are noted high-tech knowledge economy centers. San Jose tops the list, high-tech hot spots Austin takes second and Raleigh third, and Washington, D.C., comes in fifth place...


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The Global Cities That Offer the Most Opportunity

The Global Cities That Offer the Most Opportunity | Urban economy | Scoop.it
A new report ranks the world's leading cities for economic, technological, and social opportunity.

New York tops the list of the world’s best "cities of opportunity," with London second and Toronto third, according to a report released this week by PricewaterhouseCoopers and the Partnership for New York City.

The report gauges 27 of the world’s largest and most influential global cities on their ability to provide opportunity to their residents — both long-term residents and new immigrants. This is what I like most about the report: It seeks to gauge the ability of cities not just to grow and develop, but to provide opportunity broadly. It notes the adaptability and resilience of cities and highlights the connection between quality of life, or livability, and long-run economic growth and development.

The 27 cities covered by the report are global powerhouses, accounting for nearly eight percent of global economic output (measured as gross domestic product) while housing just 2.5 percent of its population. The report projects that these 27 cities will add 19 million more residents, 13.7 million more jobs, and $3.3 trillion more in economic output by 2025...


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How Brownfield Redevelopment Reduces Pollution

How Brownfield Redevelopment Reduces Pollution | Urban economy | Scoop.it

The federal Environmental Protection Agency has released a comprehensive research report demonstrating that redevelopment of contaminated industrial sites in inner cities brings substantial environmental benefits. The agency studied 163 brownfield sites in five cities, comparing their impacts with those of sites where development was likely to go had the brownfields not been available.


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