Urban Agriculture
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The distribution of households living at various levels of poverty in US counties

The distribution of households living at various levels of poverty in US counties | Urban Agriculture | Scoop.it
The distribution of households living at various levels of poverty has been extensively studied. Similarly, the distribution of households receiving food stamps (enrolled in SNAP) is also well known. Not surprisingly, these populations have considerable overlap; eligibility for SNAP is based largely on income, and therefore, correlates strongly with poverty level. But there are scenarios where a household may live below the poverty line and opt not to apply (or not qualify) for food stamps. Conversely, there are situations where household income raises a family above the 100% poverty level, but due to non-financial factors (e.g., disability, employment status), the household can still receive food stamps.


In the top two maps, I show the raw county data: percentage of households living below the poverty line and percentage of households receiving food stamps. Using subsets of data provided by the Census, I was able to calculate the overlap between the groups – those households that are both below the poverty line and enrolled in SNAP – and mapped the values as percentages of each respective group. The result (bottom two maps) provides the percentage of households below the poverty line that receive food stamps (left), and the percentage of households enrolled in SNAP that are below the poverty line (right).


The top maps show that it is more common for a household to be living below the poverty line than to receive food stamps; this is not surprising, as it is much easier for a household that is below the poverty line not to apply for SNAP than for a family above the poverty line to qualify for SNAP. So, in general, a household is more likely to be below the poverty line than to get food stamps, making the top left map darker than the top right map. Despite these differences, the variables are still well correlated (r^2 = 0.67).


The two calculated percentages, however, have only a weak correlation (r^2 = 0.17). This is where the data show some interesting results. If the trend described in the previous paragraph held true, the bottom right map should typically be darker than the bottom left map; because there are fewer households receiving food stamps than living below the poverty line, there should be a higher percentage of households enrolled in SNAP who are below the poverty line than the percentage of households below the poverty line who are enrolled in SNAP.


As a consequence, any regions where the bottom left map is darker than the bottom right map indicates a region that contradicts the norm. States such as Oregon, Michigan, and Maine, represent regions where a household is more likely to be enrolled in SNAP than living below the poverty line. This suggests that these states have unusually high percentages of households above the poverty line who are receiving food stamps.



Data source: http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/index.xhtml (Table S2201)

Via Mathijs Booden
Diane Crossfield's insight:

Areas of concentrated poverty are more likely to experience Food Desert conditions, in which access to fresh food is extremely limited or non-existent. These are the communities most in need of Urban Agriculture.

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Urban Agriculture in Cuba

This short documentary, produced by Anna Farb and Rachel Gilbert, focuses on urban agriculture in Cuba. Footage was taken during a 9-day trip to Havana throu...
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Urban agriculture from around the world (Part I)

The global phenomenon and return of urban agriculture. Pictures, movies, and clips compiling materials available on-line about Urban Agriculture, including i...
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Urban Food Growing in Havana, Cuba

A clip from the BBC's "Around the World in 80 Gardens" (2008) showing some of the urban food gardening in Havana, Cuba. Presented by Monty Don. http://www.bb...
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Sustainable Urban Agriculture at Harvest for the Hungry

John from http://www.growingyourgreens.com/ goes on a field trip to Harvest for the Hungry to find out whats growing on. In this episode you will learn some ...
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Zero Acreage Farming - Urban Agriculture of the Future

Zero Acreage Farming - Urban Agriculture of the Future | Urban Agriculture | Scoop.it
Zero Acreage Farming - Urban Agriculture of the Future http://t.co/xsTwKogG...

Via Alan Yoshioka
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Beyond the Kale: Urban Agriculture and Social Justice Activism in NYC | The New School

Kristin Reynolds and Nevin Cohen, faculty members from The New School for Public Engagement (http://www.newschool.edu/public-engagement), will present key fi...
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A Growing Vision - Short documentary about our growing spaces

a documentary about urban farming and the future of localization. Spin farming by Curtis Stone is focused on.
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Urban Agriculture as a Vehicle for Social Change | Over Grow The ...

Urban Agriculture as a Vehicle for Social Change | Over Grow The ... | Urban Agriculture | Scoop.it
Urban Agriculture as a Vehicle for Social Change Written by Jennah Miller As a naturopathic doctor in training, public health is an aspect of health care.
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Urban Agriculture Rezoning | Boston Redevelopment Authority

Urban Agriculture Rezoning | Boston Redevelopment Authority | Urban Agriculture | Scoop.it
Working with communities to shape future development while respecting each neighborhood's past and present. (.@JennTrification @marty_walsh Thanks for the Q! Unfortunately, no. But we just passed Urban Agriculture zoning!
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