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omnia mea mecum fero
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How Our Brains Set the World Spinning

How Our Brains Set the World Spinning | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

If there’s ever excuse to publish an optical illusion as cool as the “Rotating Snakes,” I’ll take it. This illusion was invented in 2003 by Akiyoshi Kitaoka of Ritsumeikan University in Japan, and ever since, Kitaoka and other scientists have been trying to figure out why it works. A new paper by Stephen Macknik at the Barrow Neurological Institute in Phoenix may have the answer.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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The map is not the territory

The map is not the territory | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
As we’ve already begun to discover from previous posts we don’t so much see as perceive. Our eyes and brain don’t function like a camera; light falling on our retina is only the beginning...

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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The power of perceptions: Imagining the reality you want

The power of perceptions: Imagining the reality you want | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

"A human being is a deciding being," Viktor Frankl wrote in his 1946 book, "Man's Search for Meaning," which sold more than 10 million copies. "Between stimulus and response there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom."

 

Articles about PSYCHOLOGY: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=psychology

 


Via Dimitris Agorastos, Sakis Koukouvis
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Making Sense of the World, Several Senses at a Time

Making Sense of the World, Several Senses at a Time | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Our five senses–sight, hearing, touch, taste and smell–seem to operate independently, as five distinct modes of perceiving the world. In reality, however, they collaborate closely to enable the mind to better understand its surroundings. We can become aware of this collaboration under special circumstances. In some cases, a sense may covertly influence the one we think is dominant. When visual information clashes with that from sound, sensory crosstalk can cause what we see to alter what we hear.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Sakis Koukouvis
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