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Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed

Printing the Human Body: How It Works and Where It Is Headed | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

The rise of 3D printing has introduced one of the most ground-breaking technological feats happening right now. The most exciting part, though, doesn't have anything to do with printing electronics or fancy furniture, but in producing human tissues, otherwise known as bioprinting. While it is still in its infancy, the future of bioprinting looks very bright and will eventually result in some major advances for society, whilst also saving billions for the economy this is spent on research and development.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Peter Phillips's curator insight, November 27, 2013 1:55 PM

I can't see this saving money - but it will save lives. The technology to print exists. It is the question of how to develop stem cells into tissue types and then how to link these with the bodies complex control systems (nervous, circulatory and immune). in the best case scenario a grown organ will be recognised as self and the body systems will grow into them. However, organs are not toasters. Researchers are concentrating on easy things like skin grafts and ears at present, but like nano electronics, the future is full of potential and questions.

Steve Kingsley's curator insight, November 27, 2013 9:27 PM

Will HP buy Organovo, which invented and produces the NovoGen bioprinter?

Pamela D Lloyd's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:46 PM

Such astonishingly wonderful ways to use the new 3D printing technology.

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The Futurist magazine’s top 10 forecasts for 2014 and beyond — and Why They Might Not Come True

The Futurist magazine’s top 10 forecasts for 2014 and beyond — and Why They Might Not Come True | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

The Futurist magazine’s top 10 forecasts for 2014 and beyond. 

Every year, the editors of the Futurist magazine identify the most provocative forecasts and statements about the future that we’ve published recently and we put them to into an annual report called “Outlook.” It’s sprawling exploration of what the future looks like at a particular moment in time. To accompany the report, we draft a list of our top 10 favorite predictions from the magazine’s previous 12 months. What are the criteria to be admitted into the top 10? The forecast should be interesting, relatively high impact, and rising in likelihood. In other words, it’s a bit subjective.

 

There are surely better methods for evaluating statements about the future, but not for our purposes. You see, we aren’t actually interested in attempting to tell our readers what will happen so much as provoking a better discussion about what can happen—and what futures can be avoided, if we discover we’re heading in an unsavory direction.

 

The future isn’t a destination. But the problem with too many conversations about the future, especially those involving futurists, is that predictions tend to take on unmitigated certainty, sounding like GPS directions. When you reach the Singularity, turn left—that sort of thing. In reality, it’s more like wandering around a city, deciding spur of the moment what road to take.


Via Szabolcs Kósa, Margarida Sá Costa, Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Say Keng Lee's curator insight, October 7, 2013 5:06 AM

Fascinating forecasts!

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Τα επαγγέλματα του μέλλοντος

Τα επαγγέλματα του μέλλοντος | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Η λέξη Πληροφορική ήταν από χρόνια συνδεδεμένη με την έννοια του επαγγέλματος του μέλλοντος. Σήμερα όμως, η...


Via Aris P. Louvris, Informatics
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The Toilet of the Future Doesn't Need Water, Runs on Sunshine

The Toilet of the Future Doesn't Need Water, Runs on Sunshine | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

The toilet's shortcoming goes unnoticed for many of us, but it is in fact unsustainable, impractical, and unaffordable for 40 percent of the world.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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[Video] The Future Forms Of Life

The Story based on Theo Jansen's kinetic sculptures. If we work really hard on our dreams sooner or later we will reach our goals. But what if one day our dreams go too far?


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Internet Decade Later - Infographic...

Internet Decade Later - Infographic... | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

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[VIDEO] The Future of the Book.

Meet Nelson, Coupland, and Alice — the faces of tomorrow’s book. Watch global design and innovation consultancy IDEO’s vision for the future of the book. What new experiences might be created by linking diverse discussions, what additional value could be created by connected readers to one another, and what innovative ways we might use to tell our favorite stories and build community around books?


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Your House: The Next Great Digital Network

Your House: The Next Great Digital Network | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

The internet of things has been here for a while and very soon we will be interacting with our appliances via web, on a daily basis.

"If you want your washing machine to email when your clothes are clean, pick from a growing handful of startup products that are getting the job done."


Via FEED THE TEACHER, Informatics
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The Future of Architecture = No New Buildings

The Future of Architecture = No New Buildings | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

You heard it here first. NO NEW BUILDINGS. The future of architecture hangs in the balance–a balance of energy and environmental constraints that will profoundly alter the way humans interact with their environment.

 

ARCHITECTURE: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=architecture

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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[VIDEO] Peter Diamandis: We're Living as Emperors and Kings Would Have Lived 100 Years Ago

Is technology humanizing? For Peter Diamandis the answer is a resounding yes. "We're living as emperors and kings would have lived 100 years ago and we take it for granted," he tells Big Think.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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[VIDEO] - Peter Diamandis: We're Living as Emperors and Kings Would Have Lived 100 Years Ago

[VIDEO] - Peter Diamandis: We're Living as Emperors and Kings Would Have Lived 100 Years Ago | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Is technology humanizing? For Peter Diamandis, a technology optimist and the author of the new bestseller, Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think, the answer is a resounding yes. "We’re living as emperors and kings would have lived 100 years ago and we take it for granted," he tells Big Think.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Data Driven Computing: The Future Fabric of Data Analysis

Data Driven Computing: The Future Fabric of Data Analysis | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
The nature of computing has changed dramatically over the last decade, and more innovation is needed to weather the gathering data storm.

 

When subatomic particles smash together at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland, they create showers of new particles whose signatures are recorded by four detectors. The LHC captures 5 trillion bits of data — more information than all of the world’s libraries combined — every second. After the judicious application of filtering algorithms, more than 99 percent of those data are discarded, but the four experiments still produce a whopping 25 petabytes (25×10E15 bytes) of data per year that must be stored and analyzed. That is a scale far beyond the computing resources of any single facility, so the LHC scientists rely on a vast computing grid of 160 data centers around the world, a distributed network that is capable of transferring as much as 10 gigabytes per second at peak performance.

 

Google’s Alon Halevy believes that the real breakthroughs in big data analysis are likely to come from integration — specifically, integrating across very different data sets. “No matter how much you speed up the computers or the way you put computers together, the real issues are at the data level,” he said. For example, a raw data set could include thousands of different tables scattered around the Web, each one listing crime rates in New York, but each may use different terminology and column headers, known as “schema.” A header of “New York” can describe the state, the five boroughs of New York City, or just Manhattan. You must understand the relationship between the schemas before the data in all those tables can be integrated.

 

That, in turn, requires breakthroughs in techniques to analyze the semantics of natural language. It is one of the toughest problems in artificial intelligence — if your machine-learning algorithm aspires to perfect understanding of nearly every word. But what if your algorithm needs to understand only enough of the surrounding text to determine whether, for example, a table includes data on coffee production in various countries so that it can then integrate the table with other, similar tables into one common data set? According to Halevy, a researcher could first use a coarse-grained algorithm to parse the underlying semantics of the data as best it could and then adopt a crowd-sourcing approach like a Mechanical Turk to refine the model further through human input. “The humans are training the system without realizing it, and then the system can answer many more questions based on what it has learned,” he said.

 

Chris Mattmann, a senior computer scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and director at the Apache Software Foundation, faces just such a complicated scenario with a research project that seeks to integrate two different sources of climate information: remote-sensing observations of the Earth made by satellite instrumentation and computer-simulated climate model outputs. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change would like to be able to compare the various climate models against the hard remote-sensing data to determine which models provide the best fit. But each of those sources stores data in different formats, and there are many different versions of those formats.

 

Many researchers emphasize the need to develop a broad spectrum of flexible tools that can deal with many different kinds of data. For example, many users are shifting from traditional highly structured relational databases, broadly known as SQL, which represent data in a conventional tabular format, to a more flexible format dubbed NoSQL. “It can be as structured or unstructured as you need it to be,” said Matt LeMay, a product and communications consultant and the former head of consumer products at URL shortening and bookmarking service Bitly, which uses both SQL and NoSQL formats for data storage, depending on the application.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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The Big Data Explosion [infographic]

The Big Data Explosion [infographic] | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Data is everywhere!

Take a look at the data that is being produced throughout the world every day and the sources of the explosion of big data...


Via Lauren Moss
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Andres Zurita's curator insight, February 5, 2013 6:27 AM

amazing flow of info...

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[VIDEO] The Future of Education

What does the future hold for higher education? In this short animated film, we consider one set of possibilities based on current signals and trends.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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The way we'll live next

The way we'll live next | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

With cities running out of room, the world’s ever-expanding population may soon need to find new homes. But where? Sea, sky, or desert? We look at the alternatives


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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[VIDEO] A day in the life of HR

PeopleStreme presents a day in the life of Human Resources, our concept for the future of Human Capital Management. We use touch screen and tablet computer technology plus holographic imaging still to come.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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[VIDEO] Creativity in the Cloud: From the Big Bang to Twitter

[VIDEO] Creativity in the Cloud: From the Big Bang to Twitter | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

What does it mean to be connected in the 21st century? Hope, interdependence, and possibly the creation of a new consciousness, says Tiffany Shlain. Shlain is the founder of the Webby awards and creator of a new documentary, Connected: An Autoblogography about Love, Death & Technology, which premiered this year at Sundance.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Are you past oriented or future oriented

How do you spend your time?  And do you reminisce about the past, or plan for the future? 

 

Consider thinking patterns of yourself and others with the following animation video.  

 

Includes interesting perspectives on how to deal with other people.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Sakis Koukouvis
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BBC - Future

BBC - Future | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
BBC Future description goes here...

 

More on.. FUTURE: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=future

 


Via Kronos Nyne, Sakis Koukouvis
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The Next Industrial Revolution Is Now

The Next Industrial Revolution Is Now | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

A wide variety of technological change is ushering in a third industrial revolution which will change society in ways as equally momentous as England's textile mills and Ford's production line. 3D printers will change the scale of manufacturing, permit individual inventors to innovate with the efficacy of a multinational company and open new economies in far-flung communities.

 

Articles about TECHNOLOGY: http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=technology

 

 

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Forget Google Glasses: Our ‘Smart Phones’ Will Soon Be Contact Lenses

Forget Google Glasses: Our ‘Smart Phones’ Will Soon Be Contact Lenses | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

You wake up in the morning, rub your sleepy eyes. As you’re getting ready to face the day you put in your contact lens, which will make the Internet and all your files, playlists, GPS, favorite apps, and addicting games literally available with the blink of an eye. Scientists are already at the animal testing phase of the technology that will make this possible.

 

Articles about AUGMENTED REALITY http://www.scoop.it/t/science-news?tag=Augmented%20Reality

 


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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