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omnia mea mecum fero
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Infographic: 4,000 Years Of Human History Captured In One Retro Chart

Infographic: 4,000 Years Of Human History Captured In One Retro Chart | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

If time is a river, the Histomap, first published by Rand McNally back in 1931, is a raging Mississippi. In that massive river of time, each of humanity’s great civilizations becomes a confluence that ebbs, wanes, and sometimes ebbs again, each a separate current in a river that inexorably rages down to the mouth of the present day.

Although certainly not modern, the Histomap is still a breathtaking example of good infographic design: A five-foot, roll-up chart that can fit an overview of human history on any wall. Starting in 2000 B.C. with seven different civilizations--the Aegeans, the Egyptians, the Hittites, the Amorites, the Iranians, the Indians, the Huns, and the Chinese--you travel forward or backward in time as your eyes move up or down 0.75 inches. Some civilizations bleed together, others are swallowed up; some surge, others crash...


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Franc Viktor Nekrep's curator insight, August 22, 2013 4:31 AM

add your insight...

 
Sieg Holle's curator insight, August 30, 2013 9:56 AM

We can learn from history 

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Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia

Infographic: An Amazing, Invisible Truth About Wikipedia | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Every Wikipedia entry has an optional feature we take for granted--geotagging. An entry on the Lincoln Memorial will be linked to its specific latitude and longitude in Washington D.C. On any individual post, this may or may not be a useful thing. But what about looking at these locations en masse?

That was a question asked by data viz specialist and programmer Olivier Beauchesne. To find out, he downloaded all of Wikipedia (it’s open-source, after all) then used an algorithm that would assemble 300 topical clusters from popular, related keywords. Then he placed the location of each article in these topical clusters on a map. What he found was astounding...


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100 Diagrams That Changed the World

100 Diagrams That Changed the World | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

A visual history of human sensemaking, from cave paintings to the world wide web.


Since the dawn of recorded history, we’ve been using visual depictions to map the earth, order the heavens, make sense of time, dissect the human body, organize the natural world, perform music, and even decorate abstract concepts like consciousness and love.

100 Diagrams That Changed the World by investigative journalist and documentarian Scott Christianson chronicles the history of our evolving understanding of the world through humanity’s most groundbreaking sketches, illustrations, and drawings, ranging from cave paintings to The Rosetta Stone to Moses Harris’s color wheel to Tim Berners-Lee’s flowchart for a “mesh” information management system, the original blueprint for the world wide web.

But most noteworthy of all is the way in which these diagrams bespeak an essential part of culture — the awareness that everything builds on what came before, that creativity is combinational, and that the most radical innovations harness the cross-pollination of disciplines.


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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, December 29, 2012 3:20 PM

So often when we understand a concept or the relationship of big ideas, we say "I see!" .  Infographics help us see, and be seeing help us think.  This collection of diagrams have impacted the world we live in.  Take a look, perhaps you'll see...

Patrizia Bertini's curator insight, December 30, 2012 5:59 AM

I see! - goes together with embodied cognition? It seems so... Infographics as a key?

bancoideas's curator insight, December 30, 2012 9:28 AM

Ideas acerca de las ideas que tenemos sobte nosotros/as mismos/as y el mundo que co-construimos

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A Remarkable Animation Of The History Of The Universe

A Remarkable Animation Of The History Of The Universe | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
There’s so much we know that we’ll never see. We can extrapolate the concept of the Big Bang--the explosion of everything in the universe from a focused point.
So projects like Beginning, an animation by Grzegorz Nowiński from Novina Studio, are remarkably important. It tells a sort of good parts version of the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the rise of humankind. Not only is the piece pure visual delight filled with stark textures and fine particle effects that look particularly stunning when projected on water, Beginning is a grounding piece of context--somewhat imagined, sure--but the sort of imagined thing that very much centers our perspective of reality. The average person sort of knows what the Big Bang looked like because of projects like this one, even if Beginning is far more stylized than photoreal.
Via Lauren Moss
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Olivier Vandelaer's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:37 AM

This project is an intriguing visualization incorporating sound, photography, and projection- view the animation at the link (FastCompany) and read more on the process involved in creating this 4.5 minute history of the universe...

cafonso's curator insight, December 19, 2012 6:53 AM

A história do Universo em 4,5' 

Jean-Michel Bayle's curator insight, December 29, 2012 11:57 AM

A voir absolument avant la fin de l'année 2012 ... Bonne Année 2013

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Great Websites to Explore History

Great Websites to Explore History | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Rui Guimarães Lima, Informatics
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Tree Of Life: The History of the World, Visualized

Tree Of Life: The History of the World, Visualized | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
In this graphic by the Tree of Life web project and designer Leonard Eisenberg, we see all 3.5 billion years of life on earth evolving, not through limbs and timelines, but an elegant rainbow swirl. It’s as if our whole history is a colorful bunch of balloons, all tying back to bacteria.

As you look at the graphic, realize that time radiates outward and each kingdom’s appearance is also in chronological order from left to right. What you’ll discern then is a story of origins and mass extinctions, the way life almost bided its time through the Ice Age then hit the gas through the Cambrian Explosion. It was here when the protostomes (everything from trilobites to squids) simply went nuts, and the separation of plants vs. animals as we know them arose...

 

Visit the article to learn more about the graphic that visualizes the history of the world...


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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


Via Seth Dixon, Martin Daumiller, Sakis Koukouvis
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.    

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[VIDEO] Jean-Baptiste Michel: The mathematics of history (TEDTalks)

What can mathematics say about history? According to TED Fellow Jean-Baptiste Michel, quite a lot. From changes to language to the deadliness of wars, he shows how digitized history is just starting to reveal deep underlying patterns.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Konstantinos Kalemis's comment, May 23, 2012 6:46 AM
Very nice..
Sakis Koukouvis's comment, May 23, 2012 7:09 AM
Thank you, Konstantine.
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ΙΣΤΟΡΙΑ ΤΩΝ PC (TRIUMPH OF THE NERDS - ΕΛΛΗΝΙΚΟΙ ΥΠΟΤΙΤΛΟΙ)

ντοκιμαντέρ με την ιστορία των ηλεκτρονικών υπολογιστών...


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Infographic: The History of Networks

Infographic: The History of Networks | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
Remember rotary phones? Still know that morse code from Scouts? Superhighway on-ramps to a series of tubes! DARPA to Derp!

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ChronoZoom: An Interactive Timeline for Big History

Much like the recent 'Scale of the Universe 2' (http://htwins.net/scale2/), the new 'ChronoZoom' helps place our human existence within perspective of the wider cosmos. It can be quite humbling to zoom from 13 billion years of history down into our modern era, and vice versa. The HTML5 page is still in beta though, so it can be a little slow at times...


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10 Images That Changed the Course of Science (And One That Is About To)

10 Images That Changed the Course of Science (And One That Is About To) | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
One image can change the way we see the world, especially in science.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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David Rumsey Historical Map Collection

David Rumsey Historical Map Collection | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
Welcome to the David Rumsey Map Collection Database and Blog. The Map Database has many viewers and the Blog has numerous categories. The historical map coll...

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Five of the Most Important Infographics of the 19th Century

Five of the Most Important Infographics of the 19th Century | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Data visualization is not a new phenomenon. For centuries, artists and historians, educators and scientists have been creating illustrations to better communicate complex information.


From Emma Willard’s “Picture of Nations” to Dimitri Mendeleev’s Periodic Table, historical infographics continue to inspire and educate today. Here is a look at some of the most influential and beautiful infographics from the 19th century...


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Olivier Vandelaer's curator insight, February 8, 2013 5:28 AM

certainly Mendeleev’s Periodic Table

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A Remarkable Animation Of The History Of The Universe

A Remarkable Animation Of The History Of The Universe | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

There’s so much we know that we’ll never see. We can extrapolate the concept of the Big Bang--the explosion of everything in the universe from a focused point.
So projects like Beginning, an animation by Grzegorz Nowiński from Novina Studio, are remarkably important. It tells a sort of good parts version of the history of the universe, from the Big Bang to the rise of humankind. Not only is the piece pure visual delight filled with stark textures and fine particle effects that look particularly stunning when projected on water, Beginning is a grounding piece of context--somewhat imagined, sure--but the sort of imagined thing that very much centers our perspective of reality. The average person sort of knows what the Big Bang looked like because of projects like this one, even if Beginning is far more stylized than photoreal.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Olivier Vandelaer's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:37 AM

This project is an intriguing visualization incorporating sound, photography, and projection- view the animation at the link (FastCompany) and read more on the process involved in creating this 4.5 minute history of the universe...

cafonso's curator insight, December 19, 2012 6:53 AM

A história do Universo em 4,5' 

Jean-Michel Bayle's curator insight, December 29, 2012 11:57 AM

A voir absolument avant la fin de l'année 2012 ... Bonne Année 2013

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Timeline: A History Of Touch-Screen Technology : NPR

Timeline: A History Of Touch-Screen Technology : NPR | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
Today's touch-screen devices seem like a thing of the future, but the technology that runs your iPad or Android can actually be traced back to 1948 and something called the Electronic Sackbut.

Via Nan Li, Sakis Koukouvis
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11 of the Most Influential Infographics of the 19th-Century...

11 of the Most Influential Infographics of the 19th-Century... | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
We live in a world steeped in graphic information. From Google Maps and GIS to the proliferation of infographics and animated maps, visual data surrounds us.

While we may think of infographics as a relatively recent development to make sense of the immense amount of data available on the Web, they actually are rooted in the 19th century.

Two major developments led to a breakthrough in infographics: advances in lithography and chromolithography, which made it possible to experiment with different types of visual representations, and the availability of vast amounts of data, including from the American Census as well as natural scientists, who faced heaps of information about the natural world, such as daily readings of wind, rainfall, and temperature spanning decades.

But such data was really only useful to the extent that it could be rendered in visual form. And this is why innovation in cartography and graphic visualization mattered so greatly...


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Using Facial Recognition to Identify Unknown Subjects in History's Great Portraits

Using Facial Recognition to Identify Unknown Subjects in History's Great Portraits | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Agents in the war on terror attempt to identify unknown persons each and every day, but technology developed to battle criminality around the globe could soon be identifying persons of questionable identity going back centuries. Facial recognition software designed for various security and law enforcement applications is being adapted by art historians at the University of California to identify unknown faces in portraits.


Via Sakis Koukouvis
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TimeMaps - World History TimeMap

TimeMaps - World History TimeMap | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
History, map and timeline of the World, in 3500 BC the civilization of ancient Mesopotamia has emerged along with another in the Nile Valley...

Via Cornélia Castro, Sakis Koukouvis
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Η Ελληνική ιστορία στο Διαδίκτυο από το Ίδρυμα Μείζονος Ελληνισμού

Η Ελληνική ιστορία στο Διαδίκτυο από το Ίδρυμα Μείζονος Ελληνισμού | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

Η παρουσίαση της «Ελληνικής Ιστορίας στο Διαδίκτυο» πραγματεύεται την ελληνική προϊστορία, την πρωτοϊστορία και την ιστορία διαχρονικά. Για διευκόλυνση της έρευνας και της χρήσης των πληροφοριών ο χρόνος έχει χωριστεί σε πέντε μεγάλες χρονικές περιόδους: ...


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The Man of Numbers: How Fibonacci Changed the World

The Man of Numbers: How Fibonacci Changed the World | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it
What Medieval mathematics have to do with remix culture, publishing entrepreneurship, and gamification.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Interactive Historical European Map

Interactive Historical European Map | omnia mea mecum fero | Scoop.it

A useful interactive history map of Europe. Watch as boarder move as nations rise and fall.

http://ictmagic.wikispaces.com/History


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Darshan Sitharthan's comment, February 16, 2012 6:26 PM
What a great resource, best thing on scoop.it for sure
Toon Mojoham's comment, December 8, 2012 8:56 AM
THIS IS ABSOLUTELY AWESOME ;D
Matthew Moulden's curator insight, April 18, 6:14 PM

#APEuro