My Schools
18 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ashlyn Johnson from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Study sheds new light on how cellular transport systems harness energy to perform work inside the cell

Study sheds new light on how cellular transport systems harness energy to perform work inside the cell | My Schools | Scoop.it

Using highly sensitive fluorescent probes, a team of scientists from the University of Connecticut has captured the never-before-seen structural dynamics of an important protein channel inside the cell's primary power plant – the mitochondrion.

 

The University of Connecticut team's study found that the channel complex - known as the translocase of the inner mitochondrial membrane 23 or TIM23 – is not only directly coupled to the energized state of the mitochondrial inner membrane as scientists have long suspected, it also changes its fundamental structure - altering the helical shape of protein segments that line the channel - when voltage along the membrane's electrical field drops.

It also shows how fluorescent mapping at the subcelllar level may reveal new insights into the underlying causes of neurodegenerative and metabolic disorders associated with mitochondrial function.

 

In an overview of the research accompanying the paper's publication, Nikolaus Pfanner of the University of Freiberg in Germany and an international leader in the field of cellular protein trafficking, and several members of his research group, called the study "a major step towards a molecular understanding of a voltage-gated protein translocase."

 

"The molecular nature of voltage sensors in membrane proteins is a central question in biochemical research," Pfanner and his colleagues said. "The study…is not only of fundamental importance for our understanding of mitochondrial biogenesis, but also opens up new perspectives in the search for voltage-responsive elements in membrane proteins."


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashlyn Johnson from Striving Towards a Good College Life
Scoop.it!

Majors | University of Washington


Via Nicole Christine Brown
Ashlyn Johnson's insight:

This is a website about the majors they have to offer, and what the best fit will be for me.

more...
Nicole Christine Brown's curator insight, March 1, 2013 1:07 PM

This was another page to see what courses are at UW and what careers I might choose.

Rescooped by Ashlyn Johnson from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Genetically identical bacteria can behave differently depending on organelle distribution

Genetically identical bacteria can behave differently depending on organelle distribution | My Schools | Scoop.it

Genetically identical bacteria can behave in radically different ways. New study shows when bacterial cell divides there can be uneven distribution of cellular organelles. Resulting cells can behave differently from each other, depending on which parts they received in the split.

 

As these bacterial cells divide, chemotaxis machinery (bright blue and red) localize in one daughter cell. This phenomenon is crucial in the bacteria's struggle for survival. The more diversity a population of bacteria has, the more likely it will contain individuals able to take advantage of a new opportunity or overcome a new threat, including the threat posed by an antibiotic.

 

In a recent study, researchers at the University of Washington showed that when a bacterial cell divides into two daughter cells there can be an uneven distribution of cellular organelles. The resulting cells can behave differently from each other, depending on which parts they received in the split.

"This is another way that cells within a population can diversify. Here we've shown it in a bacterium, but it probably is true for all cells, including human cells," said Dr. Samuel Miller, UW professor of microbiology, genome sciences, and medicine and the paper's senior author.

 

Bridget Kulasekara, who obtained a Ph.D in the UW Molecular and Cellular Biology Program, was the paper's lead author. Other contributors included: Hemantha Kulasekara, Matthias Christen, and Cassie Kamischke, who work in Miller's lab, and Paul Wiggins, UW assistant professor of physics and bioengineering. The paper appears in the online journal eLife.

 

In an earlier paper, Miller and his colleauges showed that when bacteria divided, the concentration of an important regulatory molecule, called cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). was unevenly distributed between the two progeny. c-di-GMP is a second messenger molecule. That finding was published in the journal Science in 2010.

 

More information: Kulasekara et al. c-di-GMP heterogeneity is generated by the chemotaxis machinery to regulate flagellar motility. ELife. 2013;2:e01402. DOI: 10.7554/eLife.01402

 

Chisten M et al. Asymmetrical Distribution of the Second Messenger c-di-GMP upon Bacterial Cell Division. Science. 2010; 328(5983):1295-1297 DOI: 10.1126/science.1188658


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Ashlyn Johnson's insight:

This blog really interest me because it is about cells and how sells work and the process works.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ashlyn Johnson
Scoop.it!

Top Predictive Analytics Programs - Predictive Analytics Today

Top Predictive Analytics Programs - Predictive Analytics Today | My Schools | Scoop.it
Top Predictive Analytics Programs offered by DePaul University, Northwestern University, Louisiana State University, North Carolina State University, Catholic University of America, Central Connecticut State University etc.
Ashlyn Johnson's insight:

I scooped this website because these are analysis programs at the universities and colleges that I want to attend how their programs work.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashlyn Johnson from Post-High School Ideas
Scoop.it!

College Search - University of Washington - U-Dub

College Search - University of Washington - U-Dub | My Schools | Scoop.it
University of Washington: Get trusted and up to date information about University of Washington financial aid, admission, SAT scores, college majors, deadlines, and more at collegeboard.org.

Via OmokawaE
Ashlyn Johnson's insight:

This is the college that I want to go and I has a lot of information.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashlyn Johnson from Future Plans
Scoop.it!

University of Washington

University of Washington | My Schools | Scoop.it

My Thoughts: The website for the University of Washington is very informative. I was able to research the majors I am interested in, look for housing, check prices, and see reviews from past students. All I found were good reviews, though the admins may filter which reviews go through, and encouraged all to attend this school. If you're looking for a big campus with many opportunities, such as majors, or jobs, UW is the place to go!


Via Sawyer
Ashlyn Johnson's insight:

I like because I want to attend the University of Washington and the reviews of the school, and what it has to offer that I am interested in.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ashlyn Johnson from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Gene therapy method targets tumor blood vessels specifically

Gene therapy method targets tumor blood vessels specifically | My Schools | Scoop.it

Working in mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicinein St. Louis report developing a gene delivery method long sought in the field of gene therapy: a deactivated virus carrying a gene of interest that can be injected into the bloodstream and make its way to the right cells.

 

In this early proof-of-concept study, the scientists have shown that they can target tumor blood vessels in mice without affecting healthy tissues.

“Most current gene therapies in humans involve taking cells out of the body, modifying them and putting them back in,” said David T. Curiel, MD, PhD, distinguished professor of radiation oncology. “This limits gene therapy to conditions affecting tissues like the blood or bone marrow that can be removed, treated and returned to the patient. Today, even after 30 years of research, we can’t inject a viral vector to deliver a gene and have it go to the right place.”

 

But now, investigators at Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine say they have designed a “targetable injectable vector” – a deactivated virus that homes in on the inner lining of tumor blood vessels and does not get stuck in the liver, a problem that has plagued past attempts.  The findings are reported Dec. 23 in PLOS ONE. 

 

“We don’t want to kill tumor vessels,” said senior author Jeffrey M. Arbeit, MD, professor of urologic surgery and of cell biology and physiology. “We want to hijack them and turn them into factories for producing molecules that alter the tumor microenvironment so that it no longer nurtures the tumor. This could stop the tumor growth itself or cooperate with standard chemotherapy and radiation to make them more effective. One advantage of this strategy is that it could be applied to nearly all of the most common cancers affecting patients.”

 

In theory, Arbeit pointed out, this approach could be applied to diseases other than cancer in which the blood vessels are abnormal, including conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis or heart failure.

The viral vector Curiel, Arbeit and their colleagues developed contains a section of DNA called ROBO4 known to be switched on in the cells lining blood vessels within tumors.

 

In mice, the researchers showed that they could inject the vector into the blood stream and that it accumulated in the tumor vasculature, largely avoiding the lung, kidney, heart and other healthy organs.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Ashlyn Johnson's insight:

I like this blog because I want to be an crime lab bio technician and you need to know a lot about cells and DNA, and this is availble at the University of Washington.

more...
No comment yet.