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An online collection of education, income and health news by and for United Ways and their community partners
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Santa Clara Safe Routes to School - Safety Tips for Parents and Students

SAFETY TIPS FOR PARENTS AND STUDENTS

 

Walking:

 

Parents: choose the best route to school and walk it with your children.

 

Always walk with a parent, a group of students, or a buddy.

Only cross the street at a corner or a marked crosswalk. Look left, right, and left again before crossing the street.

At a 4-way intersection, also look over your shoulder for cars that may be turning. Use eye contact and hand signals to communicate with drivers before crossing.

 

Bicycling:

 

Parents: choose the safest route for biking to and from school and ride it with your children.

 

Always wear a helmet that fits correctly.

Inexperienced riders under the age of 10 should ride on the sidewalk.

When riding on the sidewalk, ride slow and watch for cars entering or leaving driveways.

Obey all traffic signs and signals.

Ride on the right side of the street (with traffic flow), single file, and in a straight line.

Use proper hand signals before turning and stopping.

 

Pick-up and Drop-off:

 

Make sure children enter and exit the vehicle on the passenger side of the car, next to the sidewalk.

Do not block crosswalks at any time.

Obey all traffic signs and driving laws- they exist for the safety of the community.

If your school’s drop-off point is exceptionally crowded, consider parking a few blocks away and walking your child the rest of the way.

 

Be a safety role model for your children- wear your seatbelt, drive safely, and be aware of and courteous to pedestrians.

 

The 5 E’s

 

The five elements of a successful Safe Routes to School Program are called “The 5 E’s”.  These four E’s are made up of:

 

- Engineering

-  Education

- Encouragement

- Enforcement

- Evaluation

 

Each E has a wide range of programs and elements that a school or community can utilize to make walking or biking to school safer and easier.  The success of a Safe Routes to School program depends upon community support and volunteers. The links above will introduce you to all the tools that can be utilized in a Safe Routes to School program. Get informed, get inspired, and help us make Safe Route to School a success!

 

More resources available here:  http://saferoutesinfo.org/

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City leaders, community partners react to Grand Rapids superintendent's 'bold' transformation plan

City leaders, community partners react to Grand Rapids superintendent's 'bold' transformation plan | United Way | Scoop.it

Seventeen of Grand Rapids Public Schools 43 buildings are at or below 60 percent capacity.

GRAND RAPIDS, MI - City Manager Greg Sundstrom said he respects and appreciates the bold leadership of Superintendent Teresa Weatherall Neal in putting forth a transformation plan focused on kids being college and career ready.

 

On Monday, Oct. 29, Neal introduced a proposal to the school board that would close 10 school buildings, consolidates schools and programs, and closes and reopens more innovative, appealing programs on the same sites. The building plan is meant to support her new academic plan, funneling money saved into improving teaching and learning.

 

RELATED: Grand Rapids superintendent unveils plans to close Creston, other schools as part of consolidation, reinvention plan

 

"I agree with Superintendent Neal that Grand Rapids Public Schools has a significant impact on the entire community. After all, they are training the workforce of tomorrow," Sundstrom said. "It is important for this community to have a well-trained workforce."

 

"A transformation plan means rethinking everything you do, not incremental change but bold change that can have significant impact."

 

Diana Sieger, president of the Grand Rapids Community Foundation, said she thinks Neal is on the right track with her focus on putting dollars into improving achievement.

 

"The focus really needs to be on raising the graduation rate, reducing the dropout rate and preparing kids to be college and career ready," said Sieger. "When you are faced with financial challenges, you have to make some difficult choices."

 

The foundation is a key district partner, funneling a half-million dollars to Grand Rapids schools already to keep Northwest Side students on track to colleges or training for certification. Plans are to invest as much as $4.5 million this decade. Students at Harrison Park and teachers are receiving academic support through the Challenge Scholars Program, which expands to Westwood Middle next year and includes Union High School support. The group is also offering college scholarships to Harrison students graduating in Union's Class of 2020.

 

The district has a graduation rate of 47.6 percent, a dropout rate of nearly 20 percent, and less than 1 percent of comprehensive high school students are college ready based on Michigan Merit Exam and ACT. And 17 of its 43 buildings are at or below 60 percent capacity.

Neal says she can't run a district operating at a loss.

 

"I think the overall plan makes a lot of sense because No. 1, it's strategic, which is critically important," said Brian Cloyd, board chair of Grand Rapids University Preparatory Academy and a district public-private partnership, and vice president of global corporate relations for Steelcase.

"I know that the lighting rod will be around individual schools closing, reopening, and where is my child going to school, but I think parents should be asking themselves two questions: Do I want a quality education for my child? Do I want my child to have the opportunity to be successful in life?"

He said funds going into operating and maintaining half-empty buildings can be focused on every child being successful.

 

"I think it’s a very gutsy plan," said Joe Jones, president and CEO of the Grand Rapids Urban League. "I think there is a need to be bold. This seems to be well thought and most importantly, puts the district on the path to being competitive during a time when true choice in education is available in our community.".

 

Fritz Crabb, director of literacy initiatives for the Heart of West Michigan United Way, which partners with GRPS on its Schools of Hope program, said it is important the district concentrates on its academic challenges.

 

"We are happy to see the bold steps proposed by the superintendent to improve academics," said Crabb, who said they will work for the success of the plan ultimately adopted.

 

At Monday's school board work session, Neal told the board she thought the transformation plan was "thoughtful and creative" and asked they not pick it apart but vote it up or down.

 

The board is scheduled to vote Dec. 17. Five meetings are planned with the community beginning Thursday at Creston High School, 1720 Plainfield Ave. NE, one of the schools recommended for closure because its low-enroll and high operating cost.  The meeting is scheduled from 6 to 7:30 p.m.

 

To read the plan, visit the district website.

Email:mscott2@mlive.com and follow her on Facebook and Twitter @Twitter.com/GRPScotty.

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New Haven launches city-wide Parents University

Over the weekend, New Haven educated a new class of parents with the launch of the city’s latest school reform initiative ­— Parent University.

 

 

Parents University opens

By Monica Disare

Staff Reporter

Monday, November 5, 2012

 

Over the weekend, New Haven educated an inaugural class of parents with the launch of the city’s latest school reform initiative ­— Parent University.

 

Designed to teach parents how to help their children succeed in school, Parent University offers workshops and educational resources for parents of New Haven public school children. On Saturday, Gateway Community College hosted the program’s first event, which included more than 35 classes ranging from college preparation to child development. Event coordinators said they were pleased with the program’s turnout, which drew approximately 300 registered attendees. Organizers added that only standing room was available for some of the most popular classes. Parent University is expected to continue throughout the year, hosting smaller functions in local neighborhoods and another city-wide event in the spring.

 

“Parents are our first and most important teachers. Parent engagement is vital to the success of our students and for New Haven School Change,” Mayor John DeStefano Jr. said. “Today’s Parent University is part of what will be a broad and sustained effort to engage parents and to provide all families the tools and support they need to help their children succeed.”

 

Organizers said Parent University workshops were designed to help parents improve their own lives and the lives of their children. Classes focusing on students included, “How to Read with Your Child,” “Cyber Bullying and Social Networking” and “Success in Science,” while classes designated for parental improvement included “Parent Success Plan” and “Employment Marketing Profile.”

Susan Weisselberg, chief of Wraparound Services, which provides social and emotional counseling for students enrolled in New Haven’s public school system, said the parental evaluations collected at the end of workshops were “very positive”.

 

“People are very energized and excited by the event, which makes it very fulfilling,” Weisselberg said.  Abbe Smith, director of communications for New Haven public schools, said many of the most popular classes were ones that addressed child development and college planning. During “College Planning 101,” for example, parents learned how to apply for financial aid. Lisa Pressey, the parent of a New Haven eighth-grader, said she attended Parent University to learn about the New Haven Promise scholarship. She called Promise “empowering” and said Parent University exceeded her expectations.

 

The class titled “Addressing the Needs of Urban Boys” garnered a lively discussion about the challenges of raising boys in the city. Brett Rayford, director of adolescent and juvenile services for the Department of Children and Families, spoke about how to help boys navigate career paths, deal with the loss of a father and build interest in education.

 

While workshops covered a broad spectrum of topics, parents attending the event often questioned how to apply class strategies to their own lives. One parent raised her hand and said it was hard to get urban boys interested in education because boys who do well in school are ridiculed as “talking white” or “acting white.” Rayford talked about solutions to the problem. He suggested a “rite of passage” for boys or career interest tests to help students think about healthy careers early on in their education.

 

“It’s been there since I was a boy,” Rayford responded. “We devalue those who are focused on academics. It is not cool to be smart, and we’ve got to change that.”

 

He added after listening to the first session of “Addressing the Needs of Urban Boys,” a group of parents discussed forming a group to try to mitigate the problem. Pressey said she hopes that group comes together and that such a committee could include parents, teachers, administrators and students.

 

“The whole community needs to be involved,” Pressey said. “It affects everybody.”

 

Carla Chappel, the parent of a local eighth-grader, said she thought the class on urban boys’ development was valuable, but she had reservations about the first class she attended, which discussed how parents can communicate with their school. She said that while the administrator presenting at Parent University seemed to have a good system in place for parent communication, she is concerned that not all administrators have equally effective systems.

 

New Haven public school representatives said they hope to have workshops for parents throughout the year at local venues including libraries and schools. In the spring, they said they plan to have another city-wide Parent University at a setting similar to Gateway Community College.

 

Parent University provided child care services during the weekend event for children ages 3 to 12 at the Cooperative Arts and Humanities High School.

 

 

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Teacher Training Needed to Meet Technology Needs in Classrooms - US News and World Report

Teacher Training Needed to Meet Technology Needs in Classrooms - US News and World Report | United Way | Scoop.it
China tops the United States in technology integration in schools.
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Back to School | This American Life

Back to School | This American Life | United Way | Scoop.it
As kids and teachers head back to school, we wanted to turn away from questions about politics and unions and money and all the regular school stuff people argue about, and turn to something more optimistic — an emerging theory about what to teach...
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CDC - SHI - School Health Index - Adolescent and School Health

The School Health Index (SHI): Self-Assessment & Planning Guide  is a self-assessment and planning tool that schools can use to improve their health and safety policies and programs. It's easy to use and completely confidential.

 

The SHI was developed by CDC in partnership with school administrators and staff, school health experts, parents, and national nongovernmental health and education agencies to

Enable schools to identify strengths and weaknesses of health and safety policies and programs Enable schools to develop an action plan for improving student health, which can be incorporated into the School Improvement Plan Engage teachers, parents, students, and the community in promoting health-enhancing behaviors and better health
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More with Less? Really? Welcome to Back to School - Lily's Blackboard | Lily's Blackboard

More with Less? Really? Welcome to Back to School - Lily's Blackboard | Lily's Blackboard | United Way | Scoop.it

 

Yeah, we all the got the memo, and here’s the thing: if one more person smiles at me and says, “Look, times are tough. You’ve got to learn to do more with less…” Well, let’s just say, you don’t want to be that person.

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Race to the Top District (RTT-D) invites districts to apply for $400M to Support Classroom-Level Reform Efforts

The Race to the Top District competition (RTT-D) will build on the lessons learned from the State-level competitions and support bold, locally directed improvements in teaching and learning that will directly impact student achievement and teacher...

 

Key Dates Technical Assistance Webinars Overview of the Race to the Top - District Competition: August 16 or 21, 2012 Intent to Apply Due: August 30, 2012 Application Due: October 30, 2012 Grant Award Announcements: December 2012
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Big Suburban Districts Form Network of Their Own

Big Suburban Districts Form Network of Their Own | United Way | Scoop.it
Education Week reporter Christina A. Samuels follows the latest developments in the nation's school districts and digs into the issues, successes, and controversies surrounding education leadership and management.
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The Power of Academic Parent-Teacher Teams

The Power of Academic Parent-Teacher Teams | United Way | Scoop.it

This time of year, many people are reflecting on what is truly important in life and all they have to be grateful for. The most common item of the top of these lists: family.

By Ann O'Brien

 

This time of year, many people are reflecting on what is truly important in life and all they have to be grateful for. The most common item of the top of these lists: family.

Many successful individuals can point to family as a factor in that success -- perhaps because of their unwavering belief in our abilities, perhaps because they pushed us beyond what we thought we were capable of, perhaps for their financial contributions to our education. But the overarching feeling is, because of their support.

 

For those of us fortunate enough to be born into families that knew how to best support us, particularly in our academic endeavors, this support almost goes without saying. But in some families, parents who would like to help their children succeed don't know how best to do so. As educators, we can help families develop the skills needed to support their children in school and beyond. One model for doing so: Academic Parent-Teacher Teams (1) (APTT).

Academic Parent-Teacher Teams

In the mid-2000s, Dr. Maria C. Paredes (2) was Director of Community Education in Phoenix's Creighton Elementary School District and a doctoral student at Arizona State University. Responsible for creating family engagement opportunities, she set up parent workshops, hired parent liaisons and more. One major accomplishment: Repurposing the district's parent-teacher conferences, which she found "mostly ineffective, lack[ing] strategy, ... void of relevant academic substance, and ... without accountability for parents and teachers."

 

As her doctoral action research project, she developed the APTT model, in which teachers coach parents to become engaged, knowledgeable members of the academic team. In other words, teachers help build parental capacity, developing parental understanding of their children's grade-level learning goals and how to help them meet or exceed standards.

The Model

APTT has two main components. The first is three classroom team meetings each year. The "classroom team" consists of the classroom teacher and all the parents in the class. In these group meetings, the teacher reviews and explains class-level academic data, in addition to providing parents with individual data about their own child's performance and helping parents set 60-day SMART (Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Realistic, and Time-Bound) academic goals for their children. She or he also models and provides materials for activities that parents can do with their children at home, giving parents time to practice these activities with each other in a small group setting. In addition, parents can share tips among themselves. (See what these look like in action (3) -- the video is long but worth it to get a sense of the type of material covered as well as the level of comfort that parents have with teachers.)

 

The model also includes one thirty-minute in-depth individual conference between the teacher, a student and his or her family each year. At these meetings, they review performance data, create an action plan for continuous improvement, discuss how to support student learning at home, and develop stronger relationships. Additional individual conferences are scheduled as needed.

The Impact

This model appears very promising. Student achievement in both math and reading is up for students whose families have access to APTT compared to students whose families do not. The program also seems to increase student engagement, confidence and attendance, as well as improve parent-teacher communication and parent self-efficacy for supporting student learning at home. Some principals report that the model promotes a sense of community within the school that decreases discipline problems among students and that parents are more comfortable reaching out to other families to resolve conflicts. As Paredes says, "Strangers have become partners in purpose."

 

Perhaps one of the best ways to assess the perceived impact of the program is to look at teacher participation. The program started with just nine participating teachers in the Creighton School District. The next year, 79 teachers joined the program. In the third year, 187 participated. Now in year four, about 218 classrooms in Creighton are participating. And the model (which Paredes has copyrighted) has spread across the nation -- it is now reaching about 28,000 students in five states and the District of Columbia.

 

According to Paredes, one of the greatest challenges implementing this (or any model of family engagement) is some educators' mindset about families. As she says, "We often doubt families' capacity to help their children, and we often have mistaken perceptions of their ability to commit to higher expectations and standards for learning," particularly for the families of disadvantaged and minority children.

 

This season, as we reflect on the support we've received from our own families, we should remember that all individuals desire the opportunity to provide that support to their children. And we should take advantage of our position as educators to help them do so. While not every school or teacher can participate in something like APTT, we can all take steps to build the capacity of families to help their children succeed.

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Parents' Role in School Lunch

Parents' Role in School Lunch                                                                                         By Learning First Alliance on October 25, 2012 10:30 AM  

By Betsy Landers, President of the National PTA

 

It's a question parents know well: "How was school today?" This year, parents need to ask another question: "How was lunch today?" My hope is that students give an enthusiastic thumbs up, telling a story of a delicious plate full of fruits, vegetables and whole grains. But let's be honest: children probably won't say that. Not yet at least.

 

As I'm sure we've all heard by now, school lunches are different this year.  As part of a law that passed in 2010, schools participating in the National School Lunch Program (101,000 schools nationwide) will be serving meals with more fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat or fat-free milk, and portion sizes appropriate for their age groups.  Why?  There's a laundry list of reasons, but my favorite is that our kids deserve the best, and it is our responsibility as parents and educators to ensure the food they put in their bodies in school leaves them ready to learn and on a path to a healthy life.

 

It is critical to create healthy eating habits in children now to help prevent projections that half of U.S. adults will be obese by 2030 unless Americans change their ways, according to a new report released this month by the Trust for America's Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Many other studies have consistently shown that obesity is associated with poor levels of academic achievement. Fighting obesity is not just a health issue; it's integral to the academic success of our nation's children.

 

The reality nationwide is that one-third of our kids are overweight and obese. You've heard that statistic before and you may be thinking right now, "But what about those kids that play sports and need more food!"  These new school nutrition standards were not a result of the U.S. Department of Agriculture pulling meal components out of the sky.  They are based on the 2010 Nutrition Guidelines for Americans and recommendations from the Institute of Medicine, based on the most updated knowledge of the nutrition needs for the average child in their respective age range.  What's more, for many high school students, calorie levels are similar to previous years; the meals just look less like fast food and more like a balanced meal. That means students may find steamed squash on their plates where there once were tater tots, and chicken nuggets that are baked with whole grain bread crumbs.

 

An upgrade through most kids' eyes? Probably not! But that's where parents and adults come in. As parents it is our role to make sure our kids get what they need and not what they think they need.  As kids transition to healthier options this year, we must make sure that we are sending a positive message that these updates are what is best for them — physically and even academically. Parents should talk to children about how strong these new meals will make them and how healthy bodies lead to better academic performance.  Parents can bring children along to the grocery store and ask them to pick out the fruits or vegetables that they have tried at school to reinforce healthy habits at home.

 

One of the criticisms of the new meals is that they are not meeting the needs of student-athletes.  That's a real concern for some students. What can parents do? Most schools have supplementary sides available in the cafeteria that students can purchase.  Some schools may even be able to offer extra fruits and vegetables at no cost to students. To ensure all these options are healthy, parents should talk to the school food service director, administrators and coaches on the options for student-athletes.

 

Parents can always send additional foods from home for student-athletes to consume during lunch or before practice.  Parents must remember that the new school meals are the baseline and designed to meet the average student's needs.  For children with special dietary needs, parents have to be proactive — working with their children and the school to meet their child's needs, while still respecting the integrity of the program. That program is meeting the needs of most children.

As parents we know that any time there are changes to anything, there are going to be bumps in the road. For too many years, we let many of our children eat foods in school that were too high in sodium, fat and calories for their age ranges, and too low in the nutrients that their growing bodies need. I'd ask again that parents consider asking their children how lunch was when they come home from school this week.  Regardless of their answer, parents should shed positive light on the exciting changes that are going on in the lunchroom.  Because their children are worth it!

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DHR News » BALTIMORE CITY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS BRIGHT IDEA IN GOVERNMENT AWARD

DHR News » BALTIMORE CITY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS BRIGHT IDEA IN GOVERNMENT AWARD | United Way | Scoop.it
BALTIMORE CITY DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL SERVICES RECEIVES PRESTIGIOUS BRIGHT IDEA IN GOVERNMENT AWARD Posted by ptolsonon September 25, 2012

Baltimore, MD., – September 25, 2012 – Today the Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, honored the Baltimore City Department of Social Services (BCDSS) with a prestigious Bright Idea award for developing  an innovative government initiative.

 

BCDSS was one of 111 honorees in this cycle.  Since Bright Idea’s 2010 inception, 500 awards have been presented from a pool of 27,000 applications. Recipients from all levels of government—including school districts, county, city, state, and federal agencies as well as public-private partnerships— have demonstrated a creative range of solutions to issues. Examples include urban and rural degradation, environmental problems, and the academic achievement of students. Programs were evaluated and selected by a team of policy experts from academic and public sectors.

 

The Baltimore City DSS was recognized for its innovative partnership with the Baltimore City School system in implementing the highly successful Place Matters initiative that strives to place foster children within a sphere of safety and community when they are removed from their homes. A concerted effort is made to place children with someone they know to reduce the trauma of abuse, neglect and family separation.

 

When a school-age child enters BCDSS’ care, the school system is notified. Within hours, school administrators share the child’s emergency contact information with BCDSS. Social work staff use the information to locate a family member or trusted friend to consider as a placement option. In addition, BCDSS social work staff are housed within various schools throughout Baltimore City to assist with on-site issues that may arise in the school setting, work with the administration to resolve issues and serve as a resource for staff.

 

“Historically the role of social service providers has been to serve and protect needy and vulnerable children, families and adults in ways that encouraged personal responsibility,” said Molly McGrath Tierney, director of the Baltimore City Department of Social Services. “However, too frequently, social service workers have had to focus on fulfilling intake and eligibility program requirements rather than on affecting real change in their clients’ lives. Baltimore City DSS is developing creative programs and service delivery methods that yield measurable results, enable workers to be more effective and make a greater impact on the people they serve.”

 

The  selection criteria used to identify the 111 innovative government programs included: novelty, the degree to which the program demonstrates a leap in creativity; effectiveness, the degree to which the program has achieved tangible results; significance, the degree to which the program successfully addresses an important problem of public concern; and  transferability, the degree to which the program, or aspects of it, shows promise of inspiring successful replication by other governmental entities.

 

“Government innovation does not require endless resources and generous budgets,” said Stephen Goldsmith, director of the Innovations in Government Program at the Ash Center. “As exemplified by this year’s Bright Ideas, some of our country’s smartest innovations can in fact reduce government’s size while serving our citizens more efficiently and effectively.”

 

The Ash Center advances excellence in governance and strengthens democratic institutions worldwide. Through its research, education, international programs, and government innovations awards, the Center fosters creative and effective government problem solving and serves as a catalyst for addressing many of the most pressing needs of the world’s citizens.

 

Baltimore City Department of Social Services is a field office of the Maryland Department of Human Resources (DHR) the state’s primary social service provider serving over one million people annually. BCDSS provides services to over 50 percent of the state’s child welfare cases.   DHR, through its 24 local departments of social services, aggressively pursues opportunities to assist people in economic need, provide preventive services, and protect vulnerable children and adults in each of Maryland’s 24 counties.

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Maryland City Elementary School Earns Recognition for Wellness Initiatives

Maryland City Elementary School Earns Recognition for Wellness Initiatives | United Way | Scoop.it

 

When Sprout network personality Sportacus from the show LazyTown flipped his way into Maryland City Elementary School this morning, the students wanted to perform their own acrobatics just like the popular character. But once they heard that their school earned the sole AACPS Wellness School of Distinction Award this year, their excitement was overflowing with cheers.

 

"We are honored and beside ourselves," Principal Karen Soneira said. "We didn’t do all this work just for the award, but it means so much to know that we’re on the right track. Our school is so diverse and there are so many needs to think about, but focusing on wellness of the students, staff, and parents is the common fiber that enables us to be successful inside and outside the classroom."

 

The AACPS Wellness Schools of Distinction Award recognizes schools that demonstrate a high priority for the health and well-being of students, staff, and school supporters by going beyond the curriculum to produce positive outcomes for the entire school community. From an engaging outdoor classroom, to raising thousands of dollars for health causes, to earning Green School status to conducting Family Fitness nights, Maryland City’s approach to creating a culture of wellness has uniquely met the needs of its students, staff, and community through strong business partnerships and collaborations.

 

 

"If we want our young people to be successful, we must acknowledge all the factors that aid in their development and performance," Superintendent Kevin Maxwell said. "We work hard to provide proper, nutritionally-sound school meals and excellent student services to our students, but we also know that our staff deserves the same support in order to deliver instruction and be healthy role models. This award shows how a school can be the ultimate centerpiece in a community."

 

Winning the prestigious honor requires that schools demonstrate a strong effort in addressing the eight components of a coordinated school health program as outlined by the Centers for Disease Control: health education, physical activity, allied health personnel partnerships, nutrition, mental wellness, school environment, staff health, and family/community involvement.

As an extension of the AACPS Wellness Committee, the award is in its second year. Sportacus also paid a visit to Arnold and Jacobsville elementary schools, which won elementary-level awards last year.

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Why Parents Need to Monitor Skipping School

Why Parents Need to Monitor Skipping School | United Way | Scoop.it

Students who regularly cut classes and skip school say their parents are largely unaware of their failure to attend school, according to "Skipping to Nowhere," a report released today by the Get Schooled Foundation: https://getschooled.com/attendance-research.  

 

Besides that, these students don't believe that their lower-than-average attendance will create any barriers to their eventual goals of graduating high school, attending college or getting a job. Often, they are wrong.

 

"Students who miss more than 10 days of school are more than 20 percent less likely to graduate from high school than their peers, and those same students have 25 percent lower likelihood of ever enrolling in any type of college," the report says, citing the work of Robert Balfanz and Vaughan Byrnes from Johns Hopkins University's Everyone Graduates Center.

 

In fact, 7 million students miss 18 or more days of school each year, according to the report, "The Importance of Being in School: A Report on Absenteeism on the Nation's Public Schools," from those two researchers.

 

Who are the skippers? Hart Research conducted interviews in late June with 516 teens at malls in 25 cities to learn about their school attendance habits. Researchers found that students who do skip tend to skip a lot—46 percent of skippers are absent at least part of the day about once a week or more. Skipping school becomes an established behavior by the end of 9th grade, the researchers discovered.

 

 

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SURVEY: Three Out Of Five U.S. Teachers See Hunger In Classroom

Teachers Say Hunger Hurts Learning, School Breakfast Is Vital; “The saddest are the children who cry when we get out early for a snow day because they won’t get lunch”

 

WASHINGTON, Aug. 23, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — As students across the country prepare to go back to school this fall, millions of American families are still feeling the sting of unemployment, rising food and fuel prices and a sluggish economic recovery.  Teachers are first-hand witnesses to the toll hunger takes on America’s students.  According to a new survey released today by Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign, teachers are worried that hunger is stunting the learning process. They also point to a healthy school breakfast as key to a good education.

 

The survey, “Hunger In Our Schools: Share Our Strength’s Teachers Report 2012,” was conducted among more than 1,000 K-8 public school teachers nationwide. Three out of five teachers surveyed report that they see students regularly come to school hungry because they’re not getting enough to eat at home.  A majority of these teachers who witness hunger say the problem is getting worse.

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CDC - Nutrition - Facts - Adolescent and School Health

Diet and Academic Performance

Eating a healthy breakfast is associated with improved cognitive function (especially memory), reduced absenteeism, and improved mood.

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Enroll your child at Osborn | United Way for Southeastern Michigan | Live United

Enroll your child at Osborn | United Way for Southeastern Michigan | Live United | United Way | Scoop.it

By Samantha Sullivan, AmeriCorps State/National Member

 

In 2008, Osborn High School became one of the United Way Turnaround Schoolsas part of the Greater Detroit Education Venture Fund, which supports eligible school turnaround efforts in high schools that have low graduation rates. The school was divided up into small schools which assured that no student would go unnoticed.

Along with corporate partners, the AT&T and Skillman Foundations, the school is financially supported to provide proven methods for educational success.

 

Michael Tenbusch, Vice President of Educational Preparedness at UWSEM, played a significant role in choosing Osborn as one of our turnaround high schools. In 2008, the campus was broken up into four small schools, the Upper School of Global Communications and Culture; Academy of Mathematics, Science, and Technology at Osborn; Evergreen Academy of Design, Technology, and Alternative Energy; and Osborn College Preparatory Academy.

 

Because of its success, the school, along with several others, was chosen by Roy Roberts to be self-governing, which means that a governing council of civic, community, business, government, local leaders and parents will take responsibility of the performance of the school’s success. The school is now part of the Detroit Rising College Preparatory Schools.

 

The mission of United Way for Southeastern Michigan is to mobilize the caring power of Detroit and Southeastern Michigan to improve communities and individual lives in measurable and lasting ways.
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As part of an International Study Group at the Loris Malaguzzi International Centre in Reggio Emilia, Italy, I was able to visit a school that practiced the Reggio Emilia approach to early childhood...
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