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An online collection of education, income and health news by and for United Ways and their community partners
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Why college access, affordability and success are key to Texas economy - By Denise M. Trauth

Why college access, affordability and success are key to Texas economy - By Denise M. Trauth | United Way | Scoop.it
Editor's note: CultureMap Austin partners with Leadership Austin — the region's premier provider of civic and community leadership development — in this on-going series of editorial columns meant to inform Austinites about issues facing our city.
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Report shows that dropouts in Chicago are much less likely to be employed than their graduate peers | NoDropouts.org

Report shows that dropouts in Chicago are much less likely to be employed than their graduate peers | NoDropouts.org | United Way | Scoop.it

A new report looking at high school dropouts and their employment in the Chicago area paints a pretty bleak picture.

 

The report, “High School Dropouts in Chicago and Illinois and Their Persistent Labor Market Problems,” looked at numbers from the American Community Surveys of 2009, 2010 and 2011. Those surveys showed that nearly 38,000, or 15 percent, of 19- to 24-year-olds in Chicago didn’t have a high school diploma. GED holders are counted as high school dropouts in that report, but the authors warn that the numbers are likely low as respondents to the surveys sometimes exaggerate their educational credentials.

 

Those surveys, though, showed that males were nearly twice as likely to be dropouts as their female peers (18 percent versus 10 percent) and breakdowns by ethnicity showed that only 4 percent of white, non-Hispanic youth were dropouts while 18 percent of blacks were and 23 percent of Hispanics did not have diplomas.

 

“In recent decades, educational attainment in the U.S. has become a more important determinant of personal success and well-being in the labor market, social and family life, civic participation, personal physical and mental health, and overall life satisfaction,” the authors wrote. “Those adults who fail to graduate from high school with a diploma face enormous obstacles in achieving adequate employment, earnings, and incomes over their entire adult life.”

 

In 2009-2010, 47 percent of Chicago high school dropouts didn’t work at all.

Over the past 12 years, the employment numbers for dropouts age 16 to 19 has seen a devastating decline — In 1999-2000, 38.9 percent of youths were employed, but in 2011-2012, that number fell to 18.2 percent.

 

Even for those dropouts who did work, their incomes were significantly lower than others their age.

 

“During 2010-2011, the mean annual earnings of dropouts ages 18-64 in Illinois were only $13,700 versus $18,400 for those with GED, $22,200 for those with a regular high school diploma, and $33,600 for those with an Associate’s degree,” found the report, which was commissioned by the Alternative Schools Network and prepared by the Center for Labor Market Studies at Northeastern University in Boston.   

“The costs of dropping out of high school have increased over time for both the dropouts themselves and for society at large in the form of reduced federal, state, and local taxes and increased expenditures on dropouts in the form of cash and in-kind transfers,” the authors wrote. The consequences of dropping out that they highlight included:

• Lower employment rate, higher unemployment rate, fewer weeks worked per year, fewer hours of work per week

• Lower annual earnings, resulting lower lifetime earnings

• Higher poverty rate

• Lower home ownership rate

• Limited property income

• Lower marriage rate

• Higher dependency in government in-kind/cash transfers

• Lower tax contributions to local, state, and federal governments

• High food insecurity problems

• Higher incarceration rate

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The link between low-wage earning parents and youth outcomes.

The link between low-wage earning parents and youth outcomes

By Nikki Yamashiro


Last week, the Center for Social Policy at the University of Massachusetts Boston released a study that examines the effects of parents’ low-wage jobs on their children’s development and well-being. Researchers found that in families where parents work in jobs earning an hourly wage less than two-thirds of the state median hourly wage, children drop out of school at higher rates, are more likely to experience health problems—such as obesity—and are more likely to have extra responsibilities that take time away from their studies, out-of-school activities and overall personal development.

The report, “How Youth Are Put At Risk by Parents’ Low-Wage Jobs,” delves into the difficulties parents face when working in low-wage jobs, which often come with demanding work hours, less flexible schedules, few employer-based benefits and more job instability. The authors write that these parents often have a hard time balancing the needs of their families with the demands of their employers. Additionally, because of a lack of time, money and resources, parents find themselves unable to afford alternatives, such as meals that are both quick and healthy and services like child care.

The study finds that these challenges directly impact the children of these families—an estimated 3.6 million—in a number of negative ways. Parents’ time constraints and inflexible work schedules when in a low-wage job take time away from family dinners, involvement with their child’s schooling and attention to their child’s everyday life. Very much in the same vein as our issue brief released this past October, “Afterschool: A Key to Successful Parent Engagement,” the authors discuss the deep and influential relationship between children and parents. The authors link the confluence of challenges faced by parents working in low-wage jobs to the increased likelihood of negative outcomes for children, including:


- Becoming disengaged from school and dropping out,
- Leading less healthy lives—such as exercising less and eating more unhealthy foods,
- Becoming pregnant, and
- Having less time to focus on their overall well-being.

Although these findings are both alarming and disheartening, the authors do present a way forward. One solution is the need for afterschool programs that provide youth from low-income households a safe and supervised environment, reinforce their academic development, encourage healthy activities, and give their working parents peace of mind. Other recommendations in the report include greater collaboration between workforce and youth development advocates and more attention to workplace benefits for parents.

These findings strengthen the case that afterschool programs play an important role in the lives of children, especially those who are most vulnerable. What’s more, when paired with the survey results from our report, “Uncertain Times 2012: Afterschool Programs Still Struggling in Today’s Economy,” which found afterschool programs across the country are struggling to meet the needs of children and families in their communities, we see that there is also a need for greater investment in afterschool at all levels—federal, state, local and private.
LynnॐT's insight:

http://cdn.umb.edu/images/centers_institutes/center_social_policy/Youth_at_RiskParents_Low_Wage_Jobs_Fall_121.pdf

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Infographic: The Value of a STEM Education - Edutopia

Infographic: The Value of a STEM Education - Edutopia | United Way | Scoop.it

From Edutopia:  Knowledge in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) can be the key to a successful future. Here's why a STEM education matters and how you can inspire students to pursue STEM careers.

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Jobs are a cornerstone of development, says World Development Report 2013

Jobs with high development payoffs can transform societies and spur prosperity...

 

 

Washington, October 1, 2012 -- In developing countries, jobs are a cornerstone of development, with a pay off far beyond income alone. They are critical for reducing poverty, making cities work, and providing youth with alternatives to violence, says a new World Bank report. 

 

The World Development Report 2013: Jobs stresses the role of strong private sector led growth in creating jobs and outlines how jobs that do the most for development can spur a virtuous cycle. The report finds that poverty falls as people work their way out of hardship and as jobs empower women to invest more in their children. Efficiency increases as workers get better at what they do, as more productive jobs appear, and as less productive ones disappear. Societies flourish as jobs foster diversity and provide alternatives to conflict. 

 

“A good job can change a person’s life, and the right jobs can transform entire societies. Governments need to move jobs to center stage to promote prosperity and fight poverty,” says World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim, "It's critical that governments work well with the private sector, which accounts for 90 percent of all jobs. Therefore, we need to find the best ways to help small firms and farms grow. Jobs equal hope. Jobs equal peace. Jobs can make fragile countries become stable." 

 

The report’s authors highlight how jobs with the greatest development payoffs are those that raise incomes, make cities function better, connect the economy to global markets, protect the environment, and give people a stake in their societies.  

 

“Jobs are the best insurance against poverty and vulnerability,” says Kaushik Basu, World Bank Chief Economist and Sr. Vice President, “Governments play a vital enabling role by creating a business environment that enhances the demand for labor.” 

 

The global economic crisis and other recent events have raised employment issues to the center of the development dialogue. The WDR authors, who processed over 800 surveys and censuses to arrive at their findings, estimate that worldwide, more than 3 billion people are working, but nearly half work in farming, small household enterprises, or in casual or seasonal day labor, where safety nets are modest or sometimes non-existent and earnings are often meager.

 

“The youth challenge alone is staggering. More than 620 million young people are neither working nor studying. Just to keep employment rates constant, the worldwide number of jobs will have to increase by around 600 million over a 15-year period”, says Martin Rama, WDR Director. 

 

But in many developing countries, where farming and self-employment are prevalent and safety nets are modest at best, unemployment rates can be low. In those places, most poor people work long hours but cannot make ends meet. And the violation of basic rights is not uncommon. Therefore, the quality and not just the number of jobs is vitally important.

 

The Report advances a three-stage approach to help governments meet these objectives:

First, solid fundamentals – including macroeconomic stability, an enabling business environment, human capital, and the rule of law- have to be in place. Second, labor policies should not become an obstacle to job creation, they should also provide access to voice and social protection to the most vulnerable. Third, governments should identify which jobs would do the most for development given their specific country context, and remove or offset obstacles to private sector creation of such jobs.

Understanding the particular jobs challenge for a given region or country is essential. Differences in the structure of employment across regions, across genders, and across age groups are striking. For example, 6 out of 7 workers in Eastern Europe and Central Asia are wage earners, but 4 out of 5 workers in Sub-Saharan African are farmers or self-employed. Many more women than men are in non-wage work in low- and lower-middle income countries. Meanwhile, in middle-income countries women are more likely to be wage workers, though too often they earn less than men.

 

Policy priorities are different in agrarian societies and in urbanizing countries.  Making smallholder farming more productive is key in the first case, while better infrastructure, connectivity, housing, and city planning are vital in the second. Demography matters too. In Sub-Saharan Africa, 10 million youth enter the labor force every year, but in many middle-income countries the population is aging and in some the labor force is shrinking. Skills and the removal of privilege in access to markets and jobs are needed to tackle youth unemployment. But longer working lives and affordable social protection are needed in aging societies. 

 

Focusing on the key features of different country types can help identify more clearly the kinds of jobs that would make the greatest contribution to development in each case. This focus allows for an analysis of the potential tradeoffs between living standards, productivity, and social cohesion in a specific context. It provides clues about the obstacles to job creation and, ultimately, the priorities for policy makers as they identify the most important constraints to job creation and how to overcome them.

 

Policy makers should tackle these challenges by answering such questions as: Should countries build their development strategies around growth, or should they focus on jobs?  Can entrepreneurship be fostered, especially among microenterprises in developing countries, or are entrepreneurs born?  Are greater investments in education and training a prerequisite for employability, or can skills be built through jobs?  Amidst crises and structural shifts, should jobs, not just workers, be protected?  

 

Jobs agendas at the country level are connected by the migration of people and the migration of jobs. Policies for jobs in one country can thus have spillovers on other countries – both positive and negative.  The report explores whether international coordination mechanisms, such as bilateral migration agreements, could enhance the positives and mitigate the negatives.

”To move jobs center stage, we also need reliable country-level data that is disaggregated and covers more than urban or formal sector jobs,” says Rama.

 

The World Bank Group fosters job growth through its two main channels of support to the developing world -- the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) and the International Development Association (IDA) -- as well as through the IFC and the Multilateral Investment Guarantee Agency. Assistance comes in the form of policy advice, support for private sector development plus loans and programs to advance urbanization, infrastructure and human development (including social protection). 

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Investing in What Works: Recommended Reading

Investing in What Works: Recommended Reading | United Way | Scoop.it

Investing in What Works: Recommended Reading

 

Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, MD, MBA, President and CEO of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, is among several critical thinkers who have authored essays in a new book, Investing in What Works for America’s Communities. The book, a joint project of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and the Low Income Investment Fund, includes chapters on policy, finance and education, offers a hard and experienced look at what it will take to help build strong communities that support the opportunities for people to live healthy and productive lives.  

 

In her essay, “Why Health, Poverty, and Community Development Are Inseparable,” Lavizzo-Mourey writes about the growing need for collaboration across disciplines to revitalize low-income communities and create opportunities to make choices that enable all people to live a long and healthy life, regardless of where they live.

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“Mom, there’s nothing to eat” - United Way of the Wabash Valley's Hunger Challenge

“Mom, there’s nothing to eat” - United Way of the Wabash Valley's Hunger Challenge | United Way | Scoop.it

“Mom, there’s nothing to eat”

September 15th, 2012 at 11:09 pm by Jaclyn Bevis under Hunger Challenge

 

As a child, I remember saying these five words to my mom on a nearly daily basis. Luckily for me, the statement was far from true. While I may not have seen the exact brand and flavor of potato chip I wanted or my favorite Pop-Tart filling, I always had something to eat. For that, I am thankful for my parents and their efforts to make sure I never went hungry; however, as I grow older, I am more and more aware of how difficult a task keeping a cupboard full is. As I approach the United Way of the Wabash Valley’s Hunger Challenge, I know I’m about to become much more aware.

 

If you don’t know about the challenge, get ready! For the next seven days starting at midnight tonight (Saturday), here are the guidelines I’ll be following for my all food and meal choices.

I will be limited to spending $29.27 for the entire week on food. That’s $4.18 for each of the seven days. I may not use any food that I have outside of what is available to me after I make my food purchases for this week. This includes spices, milk, leftovers and baking goods. Just to reiterate, I will ONLY eat things purchased with the $29.27. I will not, and cannot, take food hand outs. That means skipping Doughnut Friday at the news station, family dinners with my fabulous, extended Terre Haute family and the free coffee from work.

 

I said basic, and those are pretty basic. Here are some other basics:

- 1 in 4 children struggle with hunger every day right here in the Wabash Valley;

- 1 in 6 adults are food insecure, meaning they don’t know where they’ll find their next meal;

- While food prices went up in the last year, SNAP assistance went down, meaning people receive less money per day for food.

 

Those three bullet points are three key reasons why I’m taking part in the United Ways second annual challenge. Adults and children alike are forced to live and eat by these dollar figures day after day, month after month.

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Opportunity Nation

Opportunity Nation | United Way | Scoop.it
Join over 1,000 national leaders, elected officials, nonprofits & businesses committed to restoring opportunity in America on Sept 19 in Washington, DC.
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2012 STEM Vital Signs Released

2012 STEM Vital Signs Released | United Way | Scoop.it

CTEq is pleased to unveil its 2012 Vital Signs, which measure the health of the K-12 STEM learning enterprise, state by state. Created in collaboration with the American Institutes for research, Vital Signs offer the most comprehensive available picture of STEM in your state—the demand for and supply of STEM skills, what states expect of students, students’ access to learning opportunities, and the resources schools and teachers have to do their work.

 

Vital Signs was made possible by generous support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

 

Other resources: 

STEM database - http://changetheequation.org/improving-philanthropy/stemworks

Washington (State's) STEM's communications guide for STEM Vital Signs - http://www.washingtonstem.org/images_load/Vital%20Signs%20Communications%20Guide_FINAL.pdf

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Education, Job Openings, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America

Education, Job Openings, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America | United Way | Scoop.it

Even as the country’s unemployment rate hovers above 8 percent, many businesses claim they can’t find skilled workers to fill job openings.

 

This Brookings paper aims to provide metro, state, and national policy makers with a better sense of the specific problems facing metropolitan labor markets. First, the analysis examines trends in the demand for educated labor and how a gap between education supply and demand is related to unemployment. Next, it attempts to distinguish between cyclical and structural effects before turning to an explanation of how an education gap might affect both by limiting job creation. It concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for public policy.

 

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College Students Need Money Management Lessons, Too

College Students Need Money Management Lessons, Too | United Way | Scoop.it
Begin by helping your child identify all of his or her school costs (tuition, room and board, books) and living expenses (car insurance, gas, parking). Don't forget discretionary items like restaurant tabs and concert tickets.
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Convince Your Kids to Save in a Language They Understand: Beer [INFOGRAPHIC]

Convince Your Kids to Save in a Language They Understand: Beer [INFOGRAPHIC] | United Way | Scoop.it

Over at LifeTuner, we were pretty proud of our infographic that depicted the power of compounding interest, but we may have just been outdone.

 

The folks over at RothIRA.com have put together a great graphic that shows how saving small early can lead to big gains by converting dollars into a more attractive retirement goal: a giant tower of beer.

 

The savings rate is a little on the small side ($1/day), so throw in a tidbit about being able to save enough for a Lake Huron-sized tub of nachos if they contribute to an employer 401(k) plan, as well.

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Out of Reach 2012: Are people earning enough to afford rent?

Out of Reach 2012: Are people earning enough to afford rent? | United Way | Scoop.it

Published by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, Out of Reach is a side-by-side comparison of wages and rents in every county, Metropolitan Area (MSAs/HMFAs), combined nonmetropolitan area and state in the United States.  According to the report, Out of Reach 2012 demonstrates that a mismatch exists between the cost of living, the availability of rental assistance and the wages people earn day to day across the country. The Housing Wage consistently exceeds the actual wages earned by renters, in both urban and rural communities nationwide.

 

Elina Bravve, Research AnalystMegan Bolton, Senior Research AnalystLinda Couch, Senior Vice President for Policy and ResearchSheila Crowley, PresidentOut of Reach is a side-by-side comparison of wages and rents in every county,...

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Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) • United Way Metro Nashville

Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA)

 

What is VITA? VITA stands for Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program. It is a nationwide program operated by volunteers from January 15 - April 15. Volunteers are trained and certified by the IRS, and then prepare tax returns for FREE for individuals & families earning less than $57,000.

 

In 2011, more than 10,000 individuals & families across the state received free tax preparation at one of the multiple VITA sites. Although tax season is still a few months away, United Way is recruiting VITA volunteers now and we need your help!


WAYS TO VOLUNTEER:

 

•Tax preparation volunteer: Training required, walk clients through tax return filing on a one-on-one basis (Training Commitment: 6-12 hours; Volunteer Commitment: 5hrs a week for 14 weeks. Volunteers can choose the site and hours for which they want to volunteer.)

 

•Cash coach volunteer: Training required. Work on-site with clients with basic financial needs such as: opening a bank account, tips for saving, filing a FAFSA for college scholarships, etc. (Training Commitment: 1hr; Volunteer Commitment: 2-3 hrs a week)

 

•Greeter: No training required. Greet clients as they arrive on-site to file their taxes. Assist with signing clients in and any other needs that site coordinator may have. (Volunteer Commitment: 2-3 hours per week)

 

•Tax Site Assistant: Training required, assists site coordinator in daily activities and acts as a Quality Reviewer of returns prepared at the tax sites. (Training Commitment: 6-12 hours for VITA certification; Volunteer Commitment: 10+ hours per week)

 

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United Way Community Impact Connections Newsletter - October 2012

United Way Community Impact Connections Newsletter - October 2012 | United Way | Scoop.it

The latest edition of the United Way Community Impact Connections Newsletter is out!

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Opportunity Nation

Opportunity Nation | United Way | Scoop.it

09.28.2012

Your Zip Code Shouldn’t Determine Your Economic Fate

Elizabeth Clay Roy, Deputy Director, Opportunity Nation

 

At the core of the Opportunity Nation campaign is the idea that, in America, the circumstances of your birth, the community you grow up in, should not condemn you or any person to an inescapable economic fate.

 

We talk a lot about the challenges we face as a nation: the jobs crisis, persistent poverty, failing schools, and more.  And we know the potential waiting to emerge when all our friends and neighbors find work and have the skills to succeed.

 

But we know from our lived experience that the ladder of opportunity in some communities has stronger rungs than others – safe communities to go to school, schools that prepare you to graduate and build a career, decent wages to help you afford a home.

 

That is why we developed the Opportunity Index in 2011 – to assess the strength of these various rungs.  Developed in partnership with Measure of America, a project of the Social Science Research Council and with support and engagement from United Way Worldwide and our coalition, the Index measures the conditions present in different communities that constrain or expand opportunity. Unlike personal characteristics, which also have an impact on mobility, these factors are amenable to policy change and to collective efforts to bring about improvements for a community’s residents.

 

We use the data in sixteen indicators to derive an Opportunity Score, a comprehensive snapshot of where a community stands today and how it can improve its future.

Last week, as part of Opportunity Nation’s national Summit in Washington, DC, we released the second annual Opportunity Index, which for the first time will allow us to identify which communities are making progress in strengthening the rungs on the ladder, and which areas still need more work.

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[INFOGRAPHIC] Reclaiming Our Nation’s Disconnected Youth | United Way

[INFOGRAPHIC] Reclaiming Our Nation’s Disconnected Youth | United Way | United Way | Scoop.it

Join the #KidsWin Rally!

 

America’s youth are facing critical times. Today there are an estimated 6.7 million disconnected youth ages 16 to 24 that are unattached to school and work.

 

Join our social media rally to raise awareness of the existing gaps in youth services and the need for federal policies to support communities in reconnecting youth.

 

Get involved. Here are three things you can do:

 

READ about the problem. Share the Infographic.

 

RALLY on social media about the importance of this critical issue.

 

PLEDGE to become a mentor for a disconnected youth or young person at risk of disconnecting from school and work.

 

READ

One in six young people between ages 16 and 24 are unattached to school or work of which 3.4 million are defined as being “chronic” having no attachment to school or the labor market since the age of 16. Dropout recovery and reengagement is a national matter with deep implications for our economy, local communities, and young people themselves.

 

Get informed. Read more about the issue of disconnected youth. Share the Infographic.

 

Find out about the economic value of disconnected youth. Read the research analyzed by Civic EnterprisesHear what people across the country are saying about disconnected youth. Read the report created by the White House Council for Community Solutions.Learn about what the long-term youth jobs gap means for America. Read the Young Invincibles report.

 

Now that you know what’s at stake, join the rally and share about why this issue is important to you, your community – and the nation at large.

 

 

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[REPORT] Measure of America's "One in Seven: Ranking Youth Disconnection in the 25 Largest Metropolitan Areas"

Via my colleague Peter Beard.

http://www.measureofamerica.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/MOA-One_in_Seven.pdf

 

Nationwide, more than 5.8 million young people—about one in seven teenagers and young adults between the ages of 16 and 24—are neither working nor in school.  Rather than laying the foundation for a productive life of choice and value, these disconnected youth find themselves adrift at society’s margins, unmoored from the systems and structures that confer knowledge, skills, identity, and purpose.  The problem of youth disconnection is serious and costly, both for young people themselves and for society. It is also a problem that worsened significantly during the Great Recession; after a decade of relatively stable rates, the rolls of the disconnected surged by over 800,000 young people between 2007 and 2010.

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From the Census: Income, Poverty, and Health Insurance Coverage in the United States: 2011

This report presents data on income, poverty, and health insurance cover-age in the United States based on information collected in the 2012 and earlier Current Population Survey Annual Social and Economic Supplements (CPS ASEC) conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. Summary of findings:

 

- Real median household income declined between 2010 and 2011, a second consecutive annual decline.

- The poverty rate in 2011 was not statistically different from 2010.

- Both the percentage and number of people without health insurance decreaased between 2010 and 2011.

 

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New report puts a harrowing face on the plight of N.J.'s working poor

New report puts a harrowing face on the plight of N.J.'s working poor | United Way | Scoop.it

The report, called ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed), is a disturbing look under the hood at exactly what it takes to survive in the Garden State...

In an unprecedented new study, five years in the making, the United Way of Northern New Jersey presents a harrowing picture of the state’s working poor. The report, called ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed), is a study of the true face of financial hardship in New Jersey, authored by Stephanie Hoopes Halpin, the director of the New Jersey DataBank at Rutgers University.

 

This is no rehash of government poverty statistics. It is, instead, a disturbing look under the hood at exactly what it takes to survive in the Garden State, who can — and cannot — make ends meet. A look at those straining and scraping to get by while living on the edge of financial collapse.

 

Download the ALICE report here:  http://www.unitedwaynnj.org/documents/UWNNJ_ALICE%20Report_FINAL2012.pdf ;

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The Lost Decade of the Middle Class

The Lost Decade of the Middle Class | United Way | Scoop.it

High level summary:

 

Since 2000, the middle class has shrunk in size, fallen backward in income and wealth, and shed some—but by no means all—of its characteristic faith in the future. These stark assessments are based on findings from a new nationally representative Pew Research Center survey that includes 1,287 adults who describe themselves as middle class, supplemented by the Center’s analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau and Federal Reserve Board of Governors.

Fully 85% of self-described middle-class adults say it is more difficult now than it was a decade ago for middle-class people to maintain their standard of living. Of those who feel this way, 62% say "a lot" of the blame lies with Congress, while 54% say the same about banks and financial institutions, 47% about large corporations, 44% about the Bush administration, 39% about foreign competition and 34% about the Obama administration. Just 8% blame the middle class itself a lot.

 

Via my colleague Peter Beard.

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SURVEY: Three Out Of Five U.S. Teachers See Hunger In Classroom

Teachers Say Hunger Hurts Learning, School Breakfast Is Vital; “The saddest are the children who cry when we get out early for a snow day because they won’t get lunch”

 

WASHINGTON, Aug. 23, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — As students across the country prepare to go back to school this fall, millions of American families are still feeling the sting of unemployment, rising food and fuel prices and a sluggish economic recovery.  Teachers are first-hand witnesses to the toll hunger takes on America’s students.  According to a new survey released today by Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry campaign, teachers are worried that hunger is stunting the learning process. They also point to a healthy school breakfast as key to a good education.

 

The survey, “Hunger In Our Schools: Share Our Strength’s Teachers Report 2012,” was conducted among more than 1,000 K-8 public school teachers nationwide. Three out of five teachers surveyed report that they see students regularly come to school hungry because they’re not getting enough to eat at home.  A majority of these teachers who witness hunger say the problem is getting worse.

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The August 2012 Edition of United Way Community Impact Connections Is Out!

The August 2012 Edition of United Way Community Impact Connections Is Out! | United Way | Scoop.it

The August 2012 Edition of "United Way Community Impact Connections" is out!

 

http://corp.unitedway.org/impact/impact_august_2012.html

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