UNIT VII
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UNIT VII
Cities and Urban Land Use
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The Ever-Expanding Slums

"Slums lack:

Permanent housingSufficient spaceClean waterSanitationPersonal safety
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L.Long's curator insight, May 5, 5:59 PM
World's Largest Slums
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:29 AM
Another GREAT resource to show to Geography students! 
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 2, 12:29 AM

The liveability of urban slums in the developing world makes an interesting study linking access to services and facilities, community identity, social connectedness, environmental quality and safety. 

 

Follow an introduction to slums using this video clip and 8.11 with the following resources that investigate the impact of rapid urbanisation on the liveability of cities.

 

Slums are a consequence of urbanisation studied in more depth  in Changing Places (Stage 9) - consequences of urbanisation. Limit the study of slums to liveability issues in stage 4 or an introduction to factors influencing liveability. 

 

GeoWorld 7 NSW

Chapter 7: Liveability:Measurement and environmental factors 

7.6 Access to shelter

Chapter 8 Urban, rural and remote places

8.6 An urban world

8.7 Why go to town?

8.8 Large cities attract people

8.10 Skyscrapers and slums

8.11 Kibera slums and flying toilets

Geothink people live in cities - Figure 8.14.3

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Historic Aerials

Historic Aerials | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
Historic Aerials provides free online access to historical aerial photography, current aerial photos and topographic (topo) maps. You can view aerial photography from the 1920s through today. Use our multi-year comparison tools to detect changes in property. Come and explore your favorite points of interest.
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Rob Whitworth

"What Cezanne did for apples, Rob Whitworth does for city traffic" - Robert Krulwich - National Public Radio (NPR) Rob Whitworth is a prominent urban filmmaker…
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California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth

California Drought Tests History of Endless Growth | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
A punishing drought is forcing a reconsideration of whether the aspiration of untrammeled growth that has for so long been the state’s engine has run against the limits of nature.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 6, 2015 8:30 PM

Major urban areas in California have limited local water resources so they draw water from large area to bring in sufficient water for these burgeoning metropolitan regions.  With this current drought getting worse, California has ordered emergency water restrictions on residents while companies and large farms have been granted exemptions even though they account for 82% of the state's annual water consumption (residential accounts for 12%). Almond farms alone consume 10% of the state's water, and many agricultural crops are incredibly water intensive land uses.  A better way to think of it isn't just about raw water usage though.  A better question to ask would be this--how does one gallon of water translate into calories that most efficiently feed people?


Questions to Ponder: How does the concept of carrying capacity relate to California urban growth/drought issues?  California passed its carrying capacity?  How are demographics, economics, politics and the environment intertwined in California?  What are the environmental limits on urban growth and development? 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, April 9, 2015 8:49 AM

The mathematics of endless growth due to economic monetary rules has a clear outcome.

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Why Do We Love Paris but Hate Frankfurt? Six Qualities of Beautiful Cities

Why Do We Love Paris but Hate Frankfurt? Six Qualities of Beautiful Cities | UNIT VII | Scoop.it

"In 'How to Make an Attractive City,' a new video from the School of Life, London-based Swiss writer Alain de Botton offers a cheeky, thought-provoking, six-point manifesto on the need for making beauty a priority in urban architecture and design."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 11:17 AM

Not everyone is a fan of Paris, but the author of this article feels that tourism can be seen as helpful proxy variable for what the general public perceives as good urbanism that makes for beautiful cities.  The six main points of this article are:

  • Order and Variety
  • Visible Life
  • Compact
  • Orientation and Mystery
  • Scale
  • Local


Tags: urban, planning, urbanism, culture, tourism.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:07 PM

History is a major attraction to tourists in any city, and Paris seems to have all these requirements to be a good urban city. The variety in architecture that is blended in within past and present structures gives a distinct look and attraction. Planning, of course, would help satisfy public expectations and the variety of culture and color would add to the delightful qualities of the city. Amenities contribute to the diversity of the city and businesses affect the image of culture in the city. 

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China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity

China’s Pearl River Delta overtakes Tokyo as world’s largest megacity | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
Several hundred million more people are expected to move to cities in East Asia over the next 20 years as economies shift from agriculture to manufacturing and services, according to a World Bank report

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Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, April 8, 2015 12:39 PM

APHG- HW Option 7

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:28 AM

Pearl river delta

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:13 AM

Cities in this region have experienced spectacular growth; they are at the heart of China's manufacturing and exporting boom.  For example, Shenzen was a small city with about 10,000 residents in 1980 but is now a megacity with over 10 million people.  China's SEZs (Special Economic Zones).  Cities that were once separate entities have coalesced into a large conurbation and if they are counted as one, it's now the largest metropolitan area.  Cities like London and New York become global cities over hundreds of years--this happened in one generation.  Click here for 5 infographics showing East Asia's massive urban growth.      


Tags: APHG, urban, industry, manufacturing, economic, unit 7 cities, megacities, China, East Asia.

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Mexico divided: Stark photos show urban wealth and povertyside-by-side

Mexico divided: Stark photos show urban wealth and povertyside-by-side | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
These photographs - part of an anti-poverty advertising campaign by a Mexico City-based agency - show an ocean of tumbledown concrete apartments next to smart, colourful residences.
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Favela Landscapes

"This gallery has a fantastic set of images showing Brazil’s poor squatter settlements-the favelas."

 

See the cultural landscape of how millions live in a megacity.


Via Allison Anthony, Malmci@Spatialzone, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:53 PM

It is interesting how the demographic pattern of Favela serve as the only option for the housing of the poor in Brazil. The lack of jobs and better opportunities force many families to build their houses in the heel of the mountains. However, these mountain based houses are faced with many severe problems involving electricity, sewage, and water. The city offers a lot of opportunities for everyone, except for the poor who are the most in need. Transportation is another issue for these impoverished communities. It takes a lot of time to go up and down from these favelas, and becomes difficult for those that live on the highest peaks. Another important concern is drugs and crime rates that make these poor neighborhood dangerous in which to reside. Favelas are typical houses in the Brazil, which has the highest percentage of poverty out of all South American countries. In the meantime, favela will continue to serve as the permanent residencies of those too poor to afford housing in the Brazilian urban landscape.

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Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/


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Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 7:31 PM

This slide show teaches you what primate cities are and gives you an example and background of one. It teaches you about Mexico City and the characteristics of it. 

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it teaches you about primate cities. Primate cities have disproportionately large populations and is over two times larger than the next largest city in the country

Zohair Ahmed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:10 AM

This power point shows the negative and positive factors accounting for Mexico City being a Primate city. 

 

The pp gives insight on how Primate cities such as Mexico have a disproportionally large population, resulting in an unbalanced economy.

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 7:45 AM

Mexico City is a primate city, since it's population is significantly larger than any other city in Mexico. Primate cities are only deemed primate cities if they are double or more the population of the running up city.

Primate cities show population distribution since a large majority of the population is centralized around one area.

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World Cities Quiz

World Cities Quiz | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
Try out some geography trivia in our World Cities Quiz: a great geography quiz that tests your knowledge of some of the major cities of the word!

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Tokyo - Megacities

Tokyo, Japan is the original mega-city, a throbbing, dynamic metropolis of 32.5 million people, well over 50 percent more massive than the world's next large...

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Ghosts of geography - Per Square Mile

Ghosts of geography - Per Square Mile | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
As I was walking home from work in San Francisco a number of years ago, a Days Inn caught my eye. The hotel itself is nothing special, but it sat at an odd angle to the street. Why would anyone build that way, I wondered.
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People and Power- Peace in the favelas

For decades Brazil's favelas - or shanty towns - have been a deadly battleground, where thousands died in the turf wars of rival gangsters and drug lords. Bu...

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Sean Rooney's curator insight, December 12, 2012 8:37 AM

This video reinforces the high crime rate and chaos in the Brazilian Favelas.  Law enforcement struggles to maintain order in the favelas.  Gangs control these shanty towns in order to survive.  Interesting firsthand accounts of law enforcement in this video.

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Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future - Kim Preshoff

Population pyramids: Powerful predictors of the future - Kim Preshoff | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
atistics are like crystal balls -- when examined closely, they can help predict a country’s future (and give important clues about the past). Kim Preshoff explains how using a visual tool called a population pyramid helps policymakers and social scientists make sense of the statistics, using three different countries' pyramids as examples.
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Ho Chi Minh City's Wild Traffic Patterns

Ho Chi Minh City's Wild Traffic Patterns | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
Photographer Rob Whitworth pieced together 10,000 images to capture the city's everyday movements
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Barcelona GO!

BARCELONA in Flow Motion - A fast moving short film.... Gold prize winner at Timelapse Showfest 2014 In few other cities is it possible to walk from spectacular…
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Maeklong Railway Market

"Multi-purpose land use."


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Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 8:44 PM

we have talked about this in class and what works in one place doesn't mean it will work everywhere. This is a sign that people adapt and build there own community whatever works to survive. This is a norm for them as you do not see any panic in the people and they have a set up that was planned out. They all grab a canopy and the train as just passed by and they are already put the canopy back up. what bothers me is the food that is just laying there and the right back side is right on top of the food. for us it is a sanitation problem to them it is a business to survive. They must hear the train coming because it can not be a schedule program what would happen if the train is not on time or early? I wonder if disaster has ever struck. I mean we wouldn't hear about it but I would have to think it has happened.

Matthew Richmond's curator insight, December 7, 2015 2:59 PM

This is insanity!! I've never seen anything like this! I always wondered why people who live in such squalor stay living in the area. If you have to pack your house up so a train to come through it might be time to move.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:15 PM
Definitely a good way for multi-purpose land use. They are utilizing the space they have conservatively, they really nailed this one on the head coming up with an idea to put a market right on a railroad track. Is this concept even safe or sanitary? Most definitely not. First off, it is not sanitary because that train on a daily basis has gone through all sorts of dirt and the train is literally passing right over the farmer's food that he is still going to sell to customers. Also, probably not the safest, because the people are just inches away from the passing train and with the wrong move, they can possibly fall onto the track and they are dead. I will hand it to them though, they act in an orderly fashion and move swiftly both when it comes and when it leaves. As a matter of fact, they go on with life so well after it leaves, it is almost like the train never passed through in the first place.
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¡Echale! a tu casa - In Photos: The World's Best Sustainability Ideas

¡Echale! a tu casa - In Photos: The World's Best Sustainability Ideas | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
**RUNNER UP, PEOPLE'S CHOICE AWARD**URBAN DESIGN FINALISTA home building and improvement program run by a 25-year-old Mexican NGO. Echale homes are made of adobe bricks called Adoblock, which use local soil. The homes have other environmentally-friendly technologies like rainwater collection systems and solar heating.
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Photographing the Extreme Transformation of the Meatpacking District

Photographing the Extreme Transformation of the Meatpacking District | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
Images from 1985 and last year show viewers just how much the Lower West Side neighborhood changed from Koch to Bloomberg.
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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | UNIT VII | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."


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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | UNIT VII | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.

 

Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 2, 2014 9:30 PM

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:41 AM

unit 7

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:29 AM

I believe that absolutely no one is surprised that right before an international event, the hosting city is cracking down on its problem areas. I am skeptical of the Brazilin governments  promise to develop the long neglected Favelas. After Rio finishes hosting the 2016 Summer games, the government will once again neglect the Favelas. There will no longer be an incentive for the government to care about the favelas. The eyes of the world will be off the  city and things can return to normal. The only losers in this equation are the actual residents of these slums. Once again the promise of better days will ripped  from them. An added injury is that there informal economy will have been destroyed. While life in an informal economy is hard by any measure, it is still a way of making a living. The increased police presence will destroy that way of life and replace it with empty promises.  

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Economic Inequality

Economic Inequality | UNIT VII | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 20, 2013 3:48 PM

Make your own conclusions...

Tony Hall's curator insight, February 20, 2013 11:44 PM

Really good series of infographics on unequal distribution of wealth in the world. Perfect for teaching IB Geography Disparities in Wealth topic.

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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | UNIT VII | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:38 PM

I thought this article was good as it gave information on how the world as we know it is growing and cities are popping up everywhere. Developing countries are seeing a large increase in growth and with that comes the growth of cities. With this, more megacities will be born and hopefully the quality of life increases with life in cities.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:09 AM

mega cities

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | UNIT VII | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 PM

This article was great in that it left me with some great visuals and details on each of the models. For me, it's hard to remember each one of the models but this article really allowed me to compare each one and read about each one all in one place. The layout of the article was also nice and I think that it was just a great overall reminder of the models.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:56 PM

This article teaches you mainly about the Burgess and Hoyt Model. It compares the two, and it gives you detailed information on lots of the urbanization terms.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about how geographers drew up cities and made models of how cities were drawn up. It teaches you how they thought back then, and how urbanization has evolved from then to now.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 5:26 PM
unit 7