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What School Lunches Look Like In 20 Countries Around The World

Here are some pictures of school lunches from around the world. Korea clearly wins this one (Japan would have if it wasn't for that spaghetti).

Via Matthew Wahl
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

Can you define the wealth of a country by what's in a lunch box?

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Matthew Wahl's curator insight, March 6, 2013 10:34 PM

A good look at what students from around th world are eating...different priorities in the USA.

UNIT VI
Industrialization and Development
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India's Potty Problem

India's Potty Problem | UNIT VI | Scoop.it

Which statement is true? 

 

A. 60% of all households without toilets in the world are in India.
B. India’s Muslims are less affected by the sanitation problem than Hindus.
C. India’s lack of toilets is worse than China’s.
D. Lack of toilets in India puts women at especially high risk.


Via Seth Dixon
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Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, April 19, 7:41 PM

Excellent article for sparking discussion on the costs of development.

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 22, 6:37 PM

Unfathomable to see that all of these are true, but at the same time not unbelievable.  I can see sanitation problems being relevant wherever there is overpopulation in the world.  Especially here where Muslims are defecating outside as a part of ritual, you wonder if they would use toilets even if they had them.  India is lucky they don't have some disease running ram,pant that can kill large portions of their population in a hurry like the plague in England.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 10:48 AM

In America, this story is not fathomable.  The sanitation problem in India goes beyond cultural norms, in my opinion.  I think it is evident of an infrastructure that is way behind the country's socioeconomic level of growth.  It seems like finally, after electing a new prime minister, that there will be much focus brought on the issue.  It also seems that if they don't shore up this sanitation issue that they will have a bigger epidemic on their hands, as there have been recent murders and rapes of young women in these sanitation fields.

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The Stunning Geography of Incarceration

The Stunning Geography of Incarceration | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
America has more than 5,000 prisons. This is what they look like on our landscape.

 

Begley’s images capture the massive scale of this entire industry and the land that we devote to it (America has less than 5 percent of the world’s population but houses a quarter of the world’s prisoners). His website, in fact, includes only about 14 percent of all of the prisons he’s captured (each one is scaled to the same size).

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, geospatial, landscape. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:27 PM

This article is interesting from a geographic and social perspective, because the overhead pictures show just how much we alter the land with our prisons.  What is really interesting is how the US has less than five percent of the world's population but has one quarter of its prisoners.  Because of this, it can be inferred that the country has many prisons.  Yet, what astonished me about the prisons is that they seem to be out in the middle of nowhere.  The buildings seem expansive on the landscape and dominate it.  It just makes me wonder, how much does the United States spend on building and up-keeping these complexes.

Incarceration's curator insight, May 8, 1:11 AM

This article explores a graphic representation of the quantity and volume of prisons throughout the United States. The project has no figures, statistics, or words - the pictures stand on their own as statements about the growing amount and size of prisons across the country. The photos show many rural prisons that house prisoners from urban areas, which changes both the areas where the prisons are and the areas that the inmates came from.

 

The photos are an intriguing visual of the money and materials put into prison systems in the United States. The photographer (Josh Begley) noted that upon seeing all the images together, the thing that stood out to him was that there were baseball fields in almost all of them. He says, "the baseball field mimicked the form about these buildings as well. There was something very American about it when I first saw it."

 

It's surprising to see how much material is necessary to, as the article described it, "warehouse" people. While prisons do more than just house inmates, seeing a visual representation of all the money put into prisons in the United States makes me wonder whether it could be better spent on reformed versions of prisons, rather than on maintaining the ones we already have and the new ones just like those that are currently being constructed.

 

- K

Lydia Tsao's curator insight, May 26, 2:43 AM

These picture demonstrate the power of satellite imagery and technology perfectly. While I am amazed by the sheer beauty in spatial organization and design by these prisons, I am horrified at the maps incarcerations that are occurring in America, especially the mass incarceration of poverty stricken minorities in America. Prisons demonstrate a larger social issue than what I previously thought. I never knew that such a thing as prison-based gerrymandering could even exist. Prisons demonstrate economic and political problems as well. With more prisons, state must allocate more of their budget to supporting these facilities. The fact that so many prisons are being built demonstrate a larger problem in the political world, and that maybe there is an issue with the justice system. Fixing the system would allow for states to allocate more money that would have been use on supporting prisons to supporting education and helping those who are less privileged.

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38 maps that explain the global economy

38 maps that explain the global economy | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
Commerce knits the modern world together in a way that nothing else quite does. Almost anything you own these days is the result of a complicated web of global interactions. And there's no better way to depict those interactions than some maps.

Via Seth Dixon
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Mr. Lavold's curator insight, September 28, 2014 7:05 PM

Many ideological issues  relate to economics - and many economic issues related to geography. Take a look at these maps and see if they help you understand the global economy and where Canada fits in. Consider how different ideologies might view these maps and the data that they contain.

Maghfir Rafsan Jamal's curator insight, September 28, 2014 10:45 PM

I find a treasure.. :D

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 1, 2014 11:14 PM

Unit 6

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Are container ships getting too big?

Are container ships getting too big? | UNIT VI | Scoop.it

What is blue, a quarter of a mile long, and taller than London's Olympic stadium?  The answer - this year's new class of container ship, the Triple E. When it goes into service this June, it will be the largest vessel ploughing the sea.  Each will contain as much steel as eight Eiffel Towers and have a capacity equivalent to 18,000 20-foot containers (TEU).  


Via Seth Dixon, Jessica Rieman
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 2014 4:32 PM

Consumed in Europe these container ships have the amount of steel of  8 Efile Towers in one container. It is a quarter mile long and taller than that of the Olympic stadium in London.  

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 22, 7:14 PM

This is so big!  I suppose we could always use these container ships as fall back housing by country should the earth get swallowed up by the ocean.  Would it be faster to have smaller ships that can cruise at a faster speed versus a larger ship that holds more?  How many places can these container ships actually fit?  Where will the outmoded ship eventually go? 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 9:53 PM

Although these massive container ships can carry more cargo, they are  also creating a recipe for a major economic disaster.  Larger ships dont do as well in the water and have greater potential for hull damage.  Any ship that loses cargo is going to cost a lot of money, but if one these larger ships go down, your talking about tens of millions of dollars of lost goods.  And thats only the cost in goods lost, not to mention the ecological cost of having oil and ship parts in the water and the cost to have it all removed.

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The ABCs of GDP 

The ABCs of GDP  | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
The Commerce Department released third-quarter gross domestic product numbers today, showing that the economy grew almost twice as fast over the summer compared to the spring. Quarterly GDP numbers serve as a ready gauge of the relative health of the economy and are often the first statistic invoked to assess...
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How Vietnam became a coffee giant

How Vietnam became a coffee giant | UNIT VI | Scoop.it

"Think of coffee and you will probably think of Brazil, Colombia, or maybe Ethiopia. But the world's second largest exporter today is Vietnam. How did its market share jump from 0.1% to 20% in just 30 years, and how has this rapid change affected the country?"

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, April 16, 3:38 PM

When Vietnam is thought of often the images of a war fought fifty years ago come to the minds of a majority of Americans, not the second largest coffee producer in the world.  Although many Vietnamese still prefer Tea over Coffee, selling the crop as an export has greatly helped the country's economy.  Coffee production also seems to be changing Vietnam, the country is not really a hardline communist country anymore, it has relations established with the United States and wanting to penetrate the US Market shows that the country does not hate the US.  However, the effects of the war make coffee farming a dangerous business in the country as there are many undetonated ordinances left in the nation from the Vietnam War.  Yet, the nation is forging ahead in coffee farming and it is greatly aiding the nation, today only 10 percent of the people in the country live below in the poverty line.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2:48 PM

Even though Vietnamese people still drink tea today, they have turned to gowing and exporting coffee as one of their major sources of income.  This exportation has decreased those living under the poverty line from 60% to only 10% in the last 20 years. 

Jared Medeiros's curator insight, April 28, 5:24 PM

Vietnam definitly does not come to mind when thuinking globaly about the coffee giants of the world.  Its a good thing for their people though that the crop is booming.  60% under the poverty line down to 10% in 30 years is astonishing, and im sure the people of Vietnam are very grateful to have such a globaly desired good.  I would hate to see what the country would look like today if this resource was unavailable to them.

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All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella

All the Countries That Contribute to a Single Jar of Nutella | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
Turkish hazelnuts, Malaysian palm oil, Nigerian cocoa, Brazilian sugar, French vanilla...

 

Some 250,000 tons of Nutella are now sold across 75 countries around the world every year, according to the OECD. Nutella is a perfect example of what globalization has meant for popular foodstuffs: Not only is it sold everywhere, but its ingredients are sourced from all over the place too.


Via Seth Dixon
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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:26 PM

Some things that we take for granted are and come from all over the world. As you said in last class just because something says that it is not made in China doesnt mean that their arent any resources that the company used to creat the item that didn't come from China or any other power house place. In this case the Palm Oil comesd from Malaysia, Hazelnut comes from Turkey, Cocoa from Nigeria, Vainilla from Brazil and, Vainilla and Sugar from France.

Mrs Parkinson's curator insight, February 12, 2014 3:48 PM

GCSE Globalisation info - great case study

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:55 AM

I was surprised to see how many countries contribute to s single jar of nutella. I have always assumed it came straight from Italy just because it is an Italian commodity. It is a positive thing to see because you look at the commerce and trade that is generated throughout the world through this one brand alone

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Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World

Interactive: The 50 Largest Ports in the World | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
Investigate for yourself the mechanisms of global trade

Via Seth Dixon
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

I tried to pinpoint intermodal connections at ports and noted the proximity of ports to other waterside uses like beaches and private craft marinas. Ports are facinating places. Think about how containerization has impacted the built landscapes shown in these maps.

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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, April 17, 2014 4:00 PM

Ressource numérique interactive mêlant planisphère, routes maritimes, graphiques de l'activité portuaire et vues aériennes des plus grands ports du monde et de leur aménagement notamment pour la conteneurisation du commerce maritime. Une ressource tout à fait exploitable en 4e bien qu'étant en anglais (très peu de texte). On pensera aussi à la classe de terminale et aux DNL anglais.

Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, April 28, 2014 1:57 PM

Un excellent site très utile lorsque l'on traite de la mondialisation


Pour aller plus loin

    - Site de l'Isemar (une mine)

    - Des statistiques très utiles

    - Les grands ports d'Asie orientale (conférence d'Yves Boquet, FIG, 2009) 

    - Conférence de Jacques Charlier : compte-rendu (conférence FIG 2013)

    - Le conteneur, une histoire de la mondialisation


FIG : Festival International de Géographie de Saint-Dié-des-Vosges


Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:05 PM

While this might simply seem like a group of ports the more important message conveyed is that in fact that the majority of them are located in East Asia. Gone are the days of the industrial centers of the earth being located in Europe and the Americas. Paired with cheap labor and ease of global transportation many of these East Asian countries are quickly over coming many of the earths previous economic giants. 

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IfItWereMyHome.com

IfItWereMyHome.com | UNIT VI | Scoop.it

How to foster geographic empathy in the classroom discussion about development? Here's one way.  This link compares MANY countries' demographics in a very personal manner. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 26, 2012 9:29 PM
Globalization discussions about raising disparity within countries often overshadow the growing inequalities between countries. What qualifies as middle class in the United States can be the equivalent of an upper-class lifestyle for many nations around the world. The same can be said in comparing what the poor in America have access to in comparison to many developing countries.
Mr. Verdugo's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:08 PM

North - South. Here we have a glance of the differences

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 8:54 AM

A great resource to compare the liveability of countries using a range of criteria. 

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US States Renamed For Countries With Similar GDPs

US States Renamed For Countries With Similar GDPs | UNIT VI | Scoop.it

This is an interesting way to visually compare the economic geography of international places with domestic locales.  The data is slightly outdated (2007) but still recent enough to be useable. 


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Creative Destruction

Creative Destruction | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
It's much worse than people realize.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 9:57 AM

The relatively recent decline of music industry, as well as the newspaper industry, are good examples to teach the concept of creative destruction.  As jobs are created through new emerging technologies, older jobs will be rendered obsolete and be 'destroyed.'  While many bemoan the loss of particular jobs as regrettable, it is a part of globalization of economic geography that as jobs are created with new technologies, other jobs disappear.  Indoor plumbing meant the death of the water-carrying guilds (while I might be sad they lost their jobs, I'm keeping my plumbing).  The trick is to make these transitions smooth and to prepare the labor force to have skills that the new economy will demand so that individual families and workers aren't casualties of this 'creative destruction' process.     


Tagseconomic, laborglobalization, unit 6 industry.

LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, March 30, 9:13 AM

Creative destruction may sound like an oxymoron—as sometimes our linguistic creativity is capable of doing, in spite of what certain expressions really mean when looked at closely ("near miss," "wireless fiber")—because it is. Yet in our minds, it makes sense, and that seems to be enough. The problem with "creative" destruction is that the creative side speaks of the "winners" and "destruction" of the losers. So we are up against a "win-lose" situation. The ultimate loss appears when we, while being creative, lose our human traits; the true measure of any technology's positive—or negative–effect on our well being beyond the merely material.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, March 31, 7:48 AM

We are becoming obsolete as a Charlie Chaplin film, perpetuate the grace of the silent film as the industry is all forward-talkie.

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Constance Considers Financial Inclusion

What is financial inclusion? No-frills bank accounts? Mobile money? Microloans? In this short, animated video, we learn how financial inclusion can improve l...

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | UNIT VI | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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Developed vs developing maps

Developed vs developing maps | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
Geography can be difficult to teach - sometimes it can seem like it's mostly just facts and places. Regions. Types of mining in different places. Weather patterns. Vegetation. Lots of, well . . . b...
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An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?
Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 2014 8:27 PM

This is very revealing

Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 2014 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | UNIT VI | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


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Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 2014 5:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 2014 10:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

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Big maq attack

Big maq attack | UNIT VI | Scoop.it

"A 50-year-old export industry that provides millions of jobs has to reinvent itself quickly to stay competitive."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:32 AM

A maquiladora is a term that often used to describe a factory in Northern Mexico that enjoys special tax breaks for eport-driven production. Northern Mexico is an ideal location for this type of industry because 1) access to American markets is high and 2) labor costs are relatively low.  The Mexican Maquiladoras can no longer compete in a ‘race to the bottom’ for the lowest skill jobs, but they can produce higher-end goods and compete with China to supply more innovative consumer goods.  Labor costs in China are on the rise, making Mexico able to compete more effectively with them on the open market.  The total value of Mexican maquiladoras exports has grown by more than 50% in the last 5 years; more foreign corporations are investing money into Mexico.  Some of the more innovative and aggressive maquiladoras are attempting to become more involved in the research and development end of production; essentially they want to start competing with European and American companies on the lucrative high-end of the commodity chain instead of fighting for the scraps at the bottom. 


TagsMexicomanufacturing, industry, economic, globalization, technology.

John Slifko's curator insight, January 13, 2014 4:02 PM

In addition to commerce what are the democratic and civil society institutions and social mvoements involved, or not involved, in this transiation now apparently underway?  

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Hans Rosling: New insights on poverty | Video on TED.com

Researcher Hans Rosling uses his cool data tools to show how countries are pulling themselves out of poverty. He demos Dollar Street, comparing households of varying income levels worldwide. Then he does something really amazing.

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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."


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Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, September 10, 2013 3:56 AM

About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 12:32 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another? - Jac de Haan

View full lesson on ed.ted.com - http://ed.ted.com/lessons/why-do-competitors-open-their-stores-next-to-one-another-jac-de-haan Why are all the gas stations,...
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A big thanks to JC for finding this video. It does a much better job than I did in class explaining Hotelling's Model

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How Africa Is Primed for Economic Take Off | Niall Ferguson | Journalism

Niall Ferguson, MA, D.Phil., is Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University. He is also a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, and a Senior Research Fellow at Jesus College, Oxford.
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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | UNIT VI | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 30, 2013 7:48 PM
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender