Unit V Agricultur...
Follow
321 views | +0 today
 
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
onto Unit V Agricultural Land Usage
Scoop.it!

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism

EU horse meat scandal exposes dangers of globalism | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
When horse meat was discovered in beef hamburgers in Ireland last month, governments, corporations and regulators assured a panicked public that it was complete

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, unit 5 agriculture, globalization, agribusiness.


Via Seth Dixon
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

What trends in agribusiness are conveyed in this map?

more...
chris tobin's curator insight, February 28, 2013 2:09 PM

Horsemeat showed up in London and the media interviewed many people who were appalled and wondering "how safe IS our meat?"

We now have to 'backtrack' to see where in the marketing loop  in between countries this actually is occurring, and also to see how regulations fell through the 'cracks'.

 

chris tobin's comment, February 28, 2013 3:44 PM
Yes the industry is all about money. The US needs to change their ways, especially in the beef and poultry business. Its mass production, inhumane to animals, and unhealthy .
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:30 PM

Why would someone want to do that to a horse? Horses are a great addition to the world because they can come in handy when it comes to pulling cargo and other objects also. Horses are having helped people for hundreds of years. I would go crazy if I found out I was eating horse meet. I am very surprised that those people from Ireland did not find out. There should really be an organization that checks the meet before it goes to supermarkets and other places. 

 

Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Scoop.it!

How I fell in love with a fish

How I fell in love with a fish | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
Chef Dan Barber squares off with a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu. With impeccable research and deadpan humor, he chronicles his pursuit of a sustainable fish he could love, and the foodie's honeymoon he's enjoyed since discovering an outrageously delicious fish raised using a revolutionary farming method in Spain.
more...
Pascal Tonecker's curator insight, April 25, 5:58 AM

Not the specific topic but a great thing!

Scooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Scoop.it!

How American Food Companies Go GMO-Free In A GMO World

How American Food Companies Go GMO-Free In A GMO World | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
Many American food companies, responding to consumer demands, are looking for grain that's not genetically modified. It turns out that non-GMO corn and soybeans aren't hard to find. Years ago, grain traders set up a supply chain to deliver non-GMO grain from U.S. farmers to customers in Japan.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Scoop.it!

When it comes to farming, does big always equal bad?

When it comes to farming, does big always equal bad? | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Spoof on Agricultural Standards


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Josune Erkizia's curator insight, March 5, 2:49 AM

Very funny

Marie-Ann Roberts's curator insight, March 5, 3:51 AM

Good for sessions on Animal Welfare and Farm Assurance.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2:07 PM

unit 5

Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Exploring farms from above

Exploring farms from above | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

"Stunning gallery of 15 images depicting agricultural landscapes."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Mary Rack's curator insight, May 23, 2013 10:28 AM

These are really beautiful and interesting, but I wish  photos could also reveal what substances are used on the land: fertilizers, pest killers, etc. I will go to his site and see if he addresses that. 

Mary Rack's comment, May 23, 2013 10:35 AM
MacLean's http://www.alexmaclean.com/ is a rich treasure trove of beauty and information! I could lose myself in it for the rest of the day. I recommend it to all thoughtful people.
Linda Alexander's curator insight, May 26, 2013 10:31 AM

When photography of farmland becomes an art form..!

Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Peer2Politics
Scoop.it!

The Commons

"a short introduction into the idea of the commons, as well as a critical review of the so called "tragedy of the commons",


Via jean lievens
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Tibet Central
Scoop.it!

Tibetan herders face uncertain future; disappearance of lifestyle that has endured for hundreds of years

Tibetan herders face uncertain future; disappearance of lifestyle that has endured for hundreds of years | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

Tibetan herder Gatou used to live a nomadic life on the grasslands of the Tibetan plateau before he was rehoused under a controversial Chinese government scheme. Now he inhabits one of scores of small brick houses that have sprung up in incongruously neat rows in the rugged and mountainous terrain of the Guoluo Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture in northwest China. "They are giving us houses for free, with electricity," Gatou told AFP. "Most people welcome this. But they are also making people settle down in fixed homes, which does not conform with the traditional lives of herders."

 

China has invested billions of dollars into resettling Tibetan herders, who have for centuries led a nomadic life, moving regularly to seek fresh grazing for their animals. Beijing says the policy is aimed at improving nomads' living standards, creating markets for their livestock and the traditional herbal medicines they gather and curbing rampant environmental degradation on the roof of the world.

 

But while some Tibetans welcome the changes, many worry about the disappearance of a lifestyle that has endured for hundreds of years, and see the resettlements as part of a broader erosion of Tibetan culture in China. Herders also complain of being forced to sell their livestock, of unfulfilled government promises of jobs, schools and medical facilities, and of corruption in the settlement scheme. "They promised me a job if I sold my herds and settled down," said a former nomad in his 40s who identified himself as Norbu. "But I can only find seasonal work and I can never make enough money to support my family. I feel cheated," he told AFP.

 

The UN Human Rights Council in January urged China to "suspend the non-voluntary resettlement of nomadic herders from their traditional lands." China should "examine all available options, including recent strategies of sustainable management of marginal pastures," and allow herders more say in how they seek out their livelihoods, it said.


Via Committee of 100 for TIbet
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Digital Delights - Images & Design
Scoop.it!

Nomadslife - Jeroen Toirkens

Nomadslife - Jeroen Toirkens | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
a photodocumentary about nomadic life, een fotodocumentaire over nomadisch leven...

...


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

What has been the realtionship between sedintary and nomadic people? How is this currently being played out?

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
A rice enriched with beta-carotene promises to boost the health of poor children around the world. But critics say golden rice is also a clever PR move for a biotech industry driven by profits, not humanitarianism.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:52 AM
As important and widely used crops go, rice is probably the most important and the most widely used in the world. As a diet staple in Asia and Africa, it helps to feed billions of people everyday. Genetically modified race promises not only nourishment, but increased nutrients for the people who consume it as a major part of their diets. The recent test of this genetically modified rice on Chinese children without full disclosure of what the rice was, however, was seen as a huge problem by many.
The ethicality of the situation is what bothered most opponents of the test, but those in favor of the super rice argue that it is good for everyone, because it helps impoverished populations who are otherwise unable to acquire the nutrients they need. This article highlights the importance of rice in a vast physical geographic context, but also deals with the idea of economic and cultural geography because of the modified rice’s impact on a large number of people’s eating habits and standard of living.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 7:14 PM

     This a very difficult debate because whoever is against using any type of enhancement  to food or any other product, no matter if is for their benefit they wont want to here about it. But I do feel that if is for the best and if is going to help for a better nutrition, I think is a good idea. I think that people are going to consume rice no matter what, if the price of the rice doesn’t goes up, the consumption will be the same but if they raise the prices because it has “more vitamins” them the consumption will be less. The world every day is getting poorer and people are having aDifficult time feeding their love ones.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:07 PM

I thought this NPR broadcast was a great out of class referece to listen too.  As it explaine all the work and research that was being done with GMOs, it also exposed them for there flaws and what the real motives behind them are. While this ex source of rice with extra vitman A will deffenitly provid more nutitonal value then regular rice, it also provides higher profit margins for the bioengneer compaines that make it. So its almost hard to say weather GMOs are a bad or good thing beacuse they do have benifts, but one thing is clear there not just being made to help the poor, there being made for big profit possibilities.

Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

A map of the U.S. depicting overall drug test positive rates

A map of the U.S. depicting overall drug test positive rates | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
Drug Testing Index; A map of the U.S. depicting overall drug test positive rates

Via Seth Dixon
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

Locate the Meth Belt

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

Global State of Agriculture

Global State of Agriculture | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
more...
Mercor's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:18 AM

Rescooped by Allison Anthony from AP Human Geography Herm

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 10:30 AM

Unit V, main idea of the unit!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 15, 10:00 AM

Unit 5

Scooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Scoop.it!

Food Inc - Full documentary

An unflattering look inside America's corporate controlled food industry
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

Watching the first 5 minutes gives you a great primer of the rise agribusiness. You will need to understand the impact that agglomeration and the industrialization of our food industry has on the location of where these operations are located.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Food Machine

Food Machine | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

UPDATE: The PBS episode "Food Machine" premiered on April 11th, 2012 on the series "America Revealed."  Now the episode is available online. 

 

"Over the past century, an American industrial revolution has given rise to the biggest, most productive food machine the world has ever known.  In this episode, host Yul Kwon explores how this machine feeds nearly 300 million Americans every day. He discovers engineering marvels we’ve created by putting nature to work and takes a look at the costs of our insatiable appetite on our health and environment.  For the first time in human history, less than 2% of the population can feed the other 98%." 


Via Seth Dixon
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

This is a great video covering our industrial agricultural complex

more...
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:13 PM

The Industrial Revolution really changed things, but it is hardly an improvement, because so many people are without the benefits of the rich percentage.  People's roles are becoming solid components that are entirely replacable and part of the machine rather than becoming creative- and by creative, I don't just mean artsy.  I think that the Research and Development part of any machine entity is the part that allows it to adapt and modify in order to change for the better and the greater good.  I look at humans as an alien species inhabiting a planet, and I could make the analogy to a college fraternity.   The planet is a mess, people try to make a buck off each other at every given opportunity, and I particularly dislike that the rich people band together like frat brothers, instead of giving less-priveledged persons the opportunity to attain equal status.  I don't think like everyone else, but I do make efforts to partake in realistic activism to cause change for the betterment of all beings- human or not.  I do believe in predestination, and that everything around us is a material and spiritual echo from the dawn of creation, but I also believe that the flaws present today will disappear tomorrow through courses of events where chosen people will alter the formation of the future, for the benefit of all beings.  Right now, with people undertipping pizza delivery men, and not donating the optional dollar at stop and shop, it is the flawed 'today' phase of the timeline, but the Industrial Revolution has made it easier for society to embrace component roles, however replacable or expendable, and that in the end will achieve greater contentment and universal success.

Scooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Scoop.it!

Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont

Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
Lawmakers in Vermont are looking to regulate food labels so customers can know which products are made from genetically modified crops, but agricultural giants Monsanto say they will sue if the state follows through.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Scoop.it!

Feeding 9 Billion - National Geographic

Feeding 9 Billion - National Geographic | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
When we think about threats to the environment, we tend to picture cars and smokestacks, not dinner. But the truth is, our need for food poses one of the biggest dangers to the planet.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms

Factory Food From Above: Images of Industrial Farms | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

"Feedlots, a new series of images crafted by British artist Mishka Henner, uses publicly available satellite imagery to show the origins of mass-produced meat products."

 

Tags: Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 6:00 PM

Does this motivate you to become #vegetarian? 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 4:19 AM

Some wild photgraphs about the devastation of mass aggriculture to the enviroment. Also their is a nice little bit about the laws behind why most people havent seen farming conditions till recent, such as some states preventing people to take pictures of their farms or factories without consent. If you are intreged by this article i suggest you watch FOOD Inc. This movie goes into great detail about how our food is made. But caution this may be one instance where igroance is Bliss because once you know exactly how your food is made you may never be able to eat some meats again. This movie can also be found on Netflix.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 11:35 AM

British artist Mishka Henner took photographs and enhanced the colors of feedlots to reveal the agribusiness of meat production. Photographs of feedlots are considered illegal and the legal repercussions of Mishka Henner are not clear at the moment, but the photographs are shocking and reveal again how little Americans know about their food production. 

Americans have changed the places and utilized them to build agribusiness empires and have introduced new problems to the landscape of feedlot and farming towns.

 

Scooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Scoop.it!

Guatemala debt-for-nature swap is a win for tropical forest conservation | The Nature Conservancy

Guatemala debt-for-nature swap is a win for tropical forest conservation | The Nature Conservancy | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it
The Nature Conservancy facilitated one of the largest debt-for-nature swaps in history ¿ and scored a significant victory for tropical forest conservation in Guatemala in the process.
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

Great case study for you to utilize in Unit V geo-cards!

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Peer2Politics
Scoop.it!

Averting a Tragedy of the Global Commons - The Globalist

Averting a Tragedy of the Global Commons - The Globalist | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

Medieval villages risked a "tragedy of the commons" when farmers — individually pursuing their economic self-interest — depleted a shared natural resource by collectively overgrazing it. Seán Cleary, founder of the FutureWorld Foundation, explains that in the hyperconnected world of today we risk a tragedy of the "global commons."


Via jean lievens
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Mongolia's Nomads

Mongolia's Nomads | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

Through his Vanishing Cultures Project photographer Taylor Weidman documents threatened ways of life.  About his work in Mongolia, he states: "Mongolian pastoral herders make up one of the world's largest remaining nomadic cultures. For millennia they have lived on the steppes, grazing their livestock on the lush grasslands. But today, their traditional way of life is at risk on multiple fronts. Alongside a rapidly changing economic landscape, climate change and desertification are also threatening nomadic life, killing both herds and grazing land."


Via Seth Dixon
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

What factors are threatening pastoral herders way of life? Why?

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 2, 2013 12:17 PM

In times of ecological hardships and global economic restructuring, many children of nomadic herders are seeking employment out of the rural areas and in the urban environment.  The cultural change that this represents is for Mongolia enormous and is captured wonderfully in this photo gallery.  Pictured above are the ger (yurt) camps that ring the capital city Ulaanbaatar.  Ulaanbaatar houses a permanent population of displaced nomads. During the winter, Ulaanbaatar is the second most air-polluted capital in the world due largely to coal burning.


Tags: Mongolia, images, indigenous, culture, globalization.  

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 11:45 AM

Time for more pictures, my favorite part of scooping. Mongolia is almost entirely forgotten in US education, to the point where many of the people I know aren't even sure if there's a government at all. My favorite part of these pictures comes from the fusion of technology and tradition though. We see traditional housing and boys carrying water to their homes, and then a flat screen television in the makeshift house. Motorcycles are used to herd animals, and solar polar is used to power cell phones for the nomads. What I think is important here among other things is the idea that humanity has potentially reached a point where we cannot go backwards tech-wise. The dark ages in Europe saw knowledge being lost, and there are claims that humanity will wipe out its own tech in a great war, but now that we have the knowledge and ability to use solar panels and automobiles, I don't believe we'll ever lose them as a species.

Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

How Far Does Your Food Travel?

How Far Does Your Food Travel? | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

Did you know that on average, orange juice travels over 1,200 miles to reach your table? Check out just how much goes into these incredible journeys.


Via Matthew Wahl
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

McDonald’s® Packaging

McDonald’s® Packaging | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:34 AM

It is sad that so much foods gets wasted all the time because it doesn't look appealing to buyers. Just because some potaoe is shaped funny or is a little darker or lighter than what is considered "normal", it is thrown away. To me, that is ridiculous when so many people are starving around the world. Or that these imperfect foods are given to animals for consumption. Why is it acceptable to animals to eat bad food when we are going to eat those animals? Somewhere down the line of history, the way we view food has been changed and not for the better. If we want to be able to sustain ourselves and this world for many more centuries, we need to revalute how we look at food. 

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 7, 2013 9:58 AM

I have eaten McDonalds fries and bunch of times and never thought about what 'golden standard" actually meant. McDonalds like it says in the article is one of the top potoate buyers in the world. I'm sure most other fast food places aren' too far behind. However since McDonalds is one of the top buyers of potatoes farmers much make sure they produce enough of the potatoes that McDonalds sells. However it doesn't stop there. Not only do farmers have to produce enough potatoes, but they have to produce quality potatoes. All of McDonalds fries look exactly the same. You never really get a french fry that looks extremely different. That is done on purpose. McDonalds only purchases potatoes that meet their "golden standard". This makes you think how much goes to watste. Farmers are probably discarding "bad" potatoes all the time that don't meet the "golden standard". Does it really matter what the fries look like, if they taste the same? There are people in the world who are hungry, yet we waste food like this all the time. I really don't think it is that big of a deal if not every french fry looks exactly the same. We should make an attempt at trying to limit our food waste. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:42 PM

Fries are the essential food that everyone enjoys in the world. But it is a good thing because if a potato has a growth defect probably that would affect someone and that is a law suit waiting to happen. In the United States people love suing for anything that they could probably win and receive money. The fries are delicious but they are so fattening that could really effect people if they have any issues with there health. 

Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Human Geography
Scoop.it!

What School Lunches Look Like In 20 Countries Around The World

Here are some pictures of school lunches from around the world. Korea clearly wins this one (Japan would have if it wasn't for that spaghetti).

Via Matthew Wahl
more...
Matthew Wahl's curator insight, March 6, 2013 10:34 PM

A good look at what students from around th world are eating...different priorities in the USA.

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 11, 2013 11:56 PM

Can you define the wealth of a country by what's in a lunch box?

Scooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS)
Scoop.it!

AMERICA REVEALED | Urban Farming | PBS

See the full episode at http://video.pbs.org/video/2214315175 Meet the ordinary people who bring food production back to basics in this clip from AMERICA REV...
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

Yes!!!! Great clip on gardening in the urban core! Detroit Rock City reversing the Von Thunen time clock and getting back to traditional land usage. Very cool.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Adrian Bahan (MNPS) from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Hot Commodities

Hot Commodities | Unit V Agricultural Land Usage | Scoop.it

"77 Photos of the mass production of the Earth's natural resources.  In the picture above, a Tibetan villager works in a salt field. Salt has been the most common food preservative, especially for meat, for thousands of years." 

Tags: consumption, agriculture, resources, labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry.


Via Seth Dixon
Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s insight:

intensive or extensive agriculture? Why?

more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 24, 2013 6:55 PM

Coal, steel, gold, iron, copper, aluminum and oil are all incredibly important commodities.  Agricultural products such as rice, cotton, corn, wheat and coffee all travel far beyond their area of origin.   Where do these resources come from?  How are they produced?  This gallery of 77 pictures is a fantastic tour of the resources that are key cogs in the global economy.  

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 24, 2013 10:55 PM

Just in time for Industry!