Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization)
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Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment | U.S. Agency for International Development

Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment | U.S. Agency for International Development | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

Long-term, sustainable development will only be possible when women and men enjoy equal opportunity to rise to their potential.


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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment | U.S. Agency for International Development

Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment | U.S. Agency for International Development | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

Long-term, sustainable development will only be possible when women and men enjoy equal opportunity to rise to their potential.


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Gender equality and development - OECD

Gender equality and development - OECD | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

Women's and girls' access to education and health is essential to their empowerment and necessary for sustainable development.

This paper examines the extent to which Development Assistance Committee (DAC) donors' aid to education and health addressed gender equality objectives, based on data collected through the DAC gender equality policy marker.

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Important Software Development Trends in 2015

In the past, software and hardware development were two separate projects with extensively different skill sets. Today, hardware typically requires some type of software to function, be it on-board code or a remote interface. At a presentation during CEA Innovate 2014 the combination of software and hardware took center stage in a session titled “The Keys to Startup Success,” which discussed key trends for technology professionals to focus on: Sensors and Wearables What started as a novelty is now one of the hottest sectors in the technology space. As nations across the world struggle to cope with rising healthcare costs, healthcare providers and companies are going to turn to medical data gathered from real time sensors to inform and improve medical decisions. For software developers, the creation of algorithms to process the troves of medical information is going to be an essential skill for many companies to succeed in the healthcare space. Additionally, coming up with effective ways to visualize this information is crucial so that users actually put it to good use. While wearable technology and sensors are technically hardware devices, software developers are going to be vital for creating applications and services that make it possible for consumers to put the devices to good use. Continue reading %Important Software Development Trends in 2015% http://goo.gl/ucyaUY
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4 Trends That Will Define Mobile Apps Development Industry in 2015

4 Trends That Will Define Mobile Apps Development Industry in 2015 | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it
There’s no doubt that mobile technology is the future of computing. As millions of smartphones and tablets continue to s…

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Women in parliament

Women in parliament | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

ALMOST 20% of the world’s parliamentary seats are now occupied by women, up from 17.2% five years ago, according to the Inter-Parliamentary Union.


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"Offshore Outsourcing Not Always a Negative Thing"

"Offshore Outsourcing Not Always a Negative Thing" | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

             One of the most controversial economic practices today is outsourcing, or the transfer of industrial business processes overseas. Offshore outsourcing is “not always a negative thing”, as the title of CBC Canada’s article suggests. The prompt for the article is the outsourcing issue involving the Royal Bank of Canada, which leads to thoughts about where outsourcing can have positive and negative effects, and for who. In particular, small businesses benefit the most from outsourcing, as any one company is able to capitalize on efficiency abroad. For instance, consider a small Toronto media business, Majestic Media. While strategy and sales are handled in Toronto, creative and technological development occurs in Latin American countries such as Argentina, and even in European countries like Poland. According to a professor at Ryerson in Toronto, outsourcing can lower costs by 30 to 40 percent, which acts as the primary motivation for outsourcing. The article proceeds to cover how outsourcing can maximize efficiency through low costs and high returns, while also discussing responsibility in business and location-specific specialty companies.

            Outsourcing and its effects on the world connect to several themes of economic geography, including Weberian Theory, site factors, and Wallerstein’s model. On a global scale, outsourcing is representative of the change in distribution of the world’s service sector, and of changing location factors. According to Alfred Weber’s Least Cost Theory, industries located themselves so as to maximize profits, which is exactly what happens with outsourcing. Weber also asserts that labor is the most important site factor, as low labor costs have clearly convinced many companies to bank on foreign labor. Furthermore, transport costs are also kept at bay, with ship transport being the most cost-effective method of moving goods. Now, consider the example of Majestic Media in Toronto. According to Wallerstein’s theory of Core-Periphery, countries in the economic periphery of the world (less-developed) supply labor for the core countries (most developed), which purposely orient themselves to take advantage of low labor costs. The company in the example executes its strategic planning in Toronto, but uses Latin American and European technopoles (agglomerated high-tech centers) to produce the best technological results.

            As suggested at the end of the article and by the example, the need for outsourcing is ultimately determined by a company’s needs in manufacturing and specialized labor. If companies continue to outsource responsibly and ensure that national jobs are not compromised, outsourcing may not be as negative as so many have considered it to be.

 

(Kazia, Alexandra. CBC News Canada. April 13th, 2013. May 21st, 2013.)


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This article highlights...Weber's Least Cost Theory

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Katie Elizabeth's curator insight, August 8, 2013 1:08 PM
Great current example of cultural change.
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The Huge Cost of India's Discrimination Against Women

The Huge Cost of India's Discrimination Against Women | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it
Gender inequality may have reduced the country's economic growth by almost 4 percent annually over the past 10 years.

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'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.

 

"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”

 

According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.

 

Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 8:50 AM

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:05 PM

With so many of the citizens living on the coast, a large typhoon like this completely destroys most of the country. When this much devastation happens all at one time it takes a very long time to recover.

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California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

"A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious international boundary lines on the planet. In this collision, in the shocking contrast of landscapes, lies one critical ingredient of the border’s place identity."


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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 27, 2013 6:29 AM

Les territoires de la mondialisation: les frontières. Une frontière qui se ferme et pourtant, une urbanisation continue mais contrastée. 

Emma Lafleur's curator insight, February 7, 2013 5:45 PM

It is interesting to see how this border has transformed from a fence to a guideline and back over time. Researchers of these two cities can learn a lot about how the events of one country affect the other country, such as in the case of 9/11. This place is also a great place to study culture because it is here where researchers can study a melding of two cultures in action. Overall, this area gives great insight into how two bordering countries affect each other politically, economically, socially, and culturally.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 23, 2013 9:46 AM

Also have heard stories of Tijuana...you know what happens there stays there.  Much like the Kennedy's in the US, Tijuana got its initial fame and wealth from the alcohol trade when the US started prohibition in the 1920, albeit the Kennedy family did it illegally with bootlegging.  Interesting contrast of building styles and cutures.  The space on the map makes this area what it is.  Without San Diego, Tijuana wouldn't be the same and San Diego wouldn't be the same without Tijuana.  This area also shows a contrast with the Canadian border.  Little or no fences on that border, but here, there are two in some spots, an old onecand a new post 9/11 one.  Why here then are there fences?  Culture too different?  Is it for racial reasons?  Is it just the drug trade and cartels that are all over the area the reason?  Is it US drug policy that makes the fence necessary?  Is it the US policy on immigration that the the fence a necessity?  Is it the worse economic conditions in Mexico or the violence that is forcing the people to run across the border?  Lots of questions and right now it looks like nobody has any real answers.   

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2014 World Cup: Will Brazil Be Ready?

ESPN Video: With the FIFA World Cup two years away, will Brazil be ready to host soccers premiere event?

 

This short sports documentary (12 minutes) looks at some of the socioeconomic and urban planning issues that are a part of the logistics for a country to prepare for a sporting event on the magnitude of the World Cup.  The discussion of demolitions in the favelas (squatter settlements) is especially intriguing.  Major sporting events of this magnitude that last for two weeks can reshape local geographic patterns for decades.  

 

Tags: sport, Brazil, planning, squatter.


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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:11 PM

I know my soccer, and I know Brazil knows its soccer considering the country has one of the richest histories in the world.  The nation eats, sleeps, and breathes the beautiful game and to host a World Cup right now is immaculate timing.  Some of the best players (possibly ever) in the world would be playing next year, all from star-studded nations.  The forecast for this spectacle will surely be one of the best in history, but that's if it all goes to plan.  There's been many videos and articles of Brazil coming into more problems than solutions.  Repairing and even building new stadiums have set back schedules and have even angered many locals.  In some cities, there have been cases of gentrification, places such as favelas have fell victim.  Being such a passionate fan of the sport, it's almost upsetting that all of these people are being misplaced to house the tournament which has been anxiously waited on since 2010.  The main picture says it all with the three hands covered in blood...  A nation which cares so much about a sport, where it is a way of life and prosperity, is in fact doing more harm than good in some areas.  In the end I hope Brazil can get back on schedule, and leave as little people harmed in the process so the world can enjoy one of the greatest sporting events come summer of 2014.

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:16 AM

The World Cup is getting closer and all eyes are on Brazil. The Favelas are seeing the worst of it. To improve their country for it's soon to be influx of tourists, the Favelas are going through practically forced renovations. Not to mention safety hazards in Brazil are being pushed to the limits with the building anf remidelling of the soccer stadiums. Just last month 2 construction workers part of the rebuilding were killed by an accident. The question is especially true. Will Brazil be ready? Soccer fans around the globe sure hope so.

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Indiana's new right-to-work law could prompt copycats

Indiana's new right-to-work law could prompt copycats | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it
When Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels signed legislation this month making Indiana the nation's first new right-to-work state in more than a decade, it turned up the heat on a long-simmering debate about the true intent and impact of the controversial...

 

Why do industries locate in particular places?  The accompanying graph and map are loaded with great thematic and spatial information for geography students.  Look at the 'right-to-work' states and mentally overlay what you know of the political map...How does that fit within the ideological leanings of these states?  How does that change employment, industry and income patterns in the various states of the United States?  Why might right-to-work laws be spreading in the near future?  What is the political leaning of the author?  What evidence to leads to that conclusion?      


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Enabling Globalization: The Container

Enabling Globalization: The Container | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

"The ships, railroads, and trucks that transport containers worldwide form the backbone of the global economy. The pace of globalization over the last sixty years has accelerated due to containers; just like canals and railroads defined earlier phases in the development of a global economy. While distance used to be the largest obstacle to regional integration, these successive waves of transportation improvements have functionally made the world a smaller place. Geographers refer to this as the Space-Time Convergence."


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Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:19 PM

Containers are part of globalization. It saves time and allows for extra space to store more products. Also, it is easier to handle using ships, railroad, and trucks while also facilitating more quality in terms of safety. However, on the other hand, with the creation of these containers employ mainly the use of technology which, unfortunately, downsizes the workforce. This, as a result, increases the unemployment rate for citizens. Although, when it comes to recycling, the idea of making houses with these containers helps families in diverse ways such as decreased costs, energy efficiency, and very short construction time. Containers have shaped the concept of shipping and living for many years, impacting regions with more business and expansion trades around the world.

Cody Price's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:57 PM

This article describes the basics of globalization and what technology really allowed globalization to spread, the shipping the container. It allowed thing to be shipped organized and more efficiently. These containers fit together perfectly. It helps ideas and products transport all over the world and spread pop culture. 

 

This relates to the idea in unit 3 of globalization. These shipping container allow ideas and products to be shipped all over the world. The shipping container was the key to better connecting the world. 

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:14 AM

I've posted here several resources about the global economy and the crucial role that containers play in enabling globalization.  In this article for National Geographic Education, I draw on many of these to to put it all in one nice container.  


Tags: transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

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Worldwide Country Comparison

Worldwide Country Comparison | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

"MyLifeElsewhere allows you to compare your home country with different countries around the world. Ever wonder what your life would be like if you were born somewhere else?"


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HG Académie de Rennes's curator insight, January 31, 2015 1:56 AM

Un site d'une grande simplicité d'utilisation bien qu'en anglais. Le principe est de choisir deux pays dans un menu déroulant pour en comparer les principaux indicateurs de développement sous la forme de petites infographies très pédagogiques.
La comparaison est évidemment un processus de raisonnement à mettre en place pour situer et caractériser en géographie. On songera ainsi à l'utilisation d'un tel outil dans le cadre de l'étude des inégalités de développement en classe de 5e et de Seconde, mais aussi pour une mise en perspective sur les Territoires dans la mondialisation en classe de 4e afin de caractériser un PMA, un pays émergent, un pays développé (cf. exemple réalisé pour l'illustration).

Dernière information sur ce site, les statistiques utilisées proviennent des bases de données open source de la CIA américaine.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, February 7, 2015 7:51 PM

After studying this comparison tool and using it to find the best of the best and worst of the worst, I picked out some highlights I'd like to share. Monaco is clearly the place to be born, earn, and live. When compared to the USA, the infant mortality rate is 71% less, the life expectancy is 10 years longer @ 84, and you'll earn 62% more money, no doubt because you have ten more years in which to do so. I believe the stats may be skewed a bit in this country comparison as the very rich live there and they have access to the best medical care, and probably don't have very many infants with them when they make the move from elsewhere, hence the low infant mortality rate. Austria is not a bad second choice as you are 33% less likely to be unemployed. On a sobering note, the life expectancy if you live in Namibia is only 52! Yikes, I'm already 53... It's far worse however in Swaziland. The life expectancy is sadly only 50.5 years and you are 44 times more likely to have AIDS than if you lived here. 26.5% of the population has AIDS! Be thankful for where you live and stop complaining, it's far worse on average in nearly all other countries.

Monika Fleischmann's curator insight, February 15, 2015 4:59 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you know that with 1/30th the territory of the United States, Norway still has over 25% more coastline?  I didn't either until I compared Norway to the United States using My Life Elsewhere.  This site is designed allow United States students to imagine how their lives might be different if they were born in a different part of the world.  Students would probably die 21 years earlier if they were born in Liberia and 11 times more likely to have died in infancy.   Students would be 43.8% less likely to grow up and be unemployed and have 36.3% less babies if they were born in Taiwan.  This side-by-side format is a great way to help students help make these statistics real and meaningful.  One major drawback: this site only allows users to compare a country to the United States.  If you prefer to have students compare, say Cuba to the United Arab Emirates, I would recommend that you try If It Where My Home. 


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IMF on Twitter

IMF on Twitter | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it
Lagarde: Peru's development is solid because it comes from here, from the grassroots and from the women. pic.twitter.com/W4uPtKBB94

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The Internet’s Ongoing Gender Gap | Democracy in Development

The Internet’s Ongoing Gender Gap | Democracy in Development | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

 

Although the Internet seems ubiquitous, for many people in the developing world it is barely a reality—and women are left behind at greater rates than men.

 

An extensive report from Intel and Dalberg Global Development Advisors, “Women and the Web,” quantifies the Internet gender gap, explains some factors contributing to it, and proposes ways to tackle it. The report estimates “that 21 percent of women and girls in developing countries have access to the Internet, while 27 percent of men have access. This represents 600 million women and girls online—200 million fewer than men and boys.” Because of the spread of the Internet, an additional 450 million women and girls will likely become connected in the next few years, but the report’s authors believe that with the right interventions, an additional 150 million women could get connected.

 

One of the report’s most valuable contributions is its work on the non-technological factors preventing women from using the Internet. In much of the developing world, basic access to the Internet is a significant problem—which is why developments like undersea cables and less expensive smartphones are particularly exciting. However, social factors that stop women from using technology at the same rate as men are an additional barrier. For example, the report features a survey of women in Uganda, Egypt, India, and Mexico. In response to the question, “Why do you not currently use the Internet (more often)?” the top four responses were:

 

Click headline to read more--

 


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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

"This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. The HDI is a comparative measure of life expectancy, literacy, education, and standard of living for countries worldwide. The HDI sets a minimum and a maximum for each dimension, called goalposts, and then shows where each country stands in relation to these goalposts, expressed as a value between 0 and 1, where greater is better. The Human Development Index (HDI) measures the average achievements in a country in three basic dimensions of human development: health, knowledge and standard of living."

 

Tags: development, statistics, worldwide.


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Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 18, 2015 10:41 AM

This article discusses the Human Development Index (HDI), what it is, and how it is calculated. 

 

This chart displays that the top three spots on the HDI are occupied by Norway, Australia, and the Netherlands respectively, with the USA coming in fourth. As HDI is calculated by comparing aspects like literacy, standard of living, education, and life expectancy, why are two European countries and Australia in the top 3? Something to be looked at is the in-migration of each country. Immigrants arrival in large numbers in some countries can lower HDI if they are refugees or come from a country with a lower HDI, for they may be illiterate, have a low education, and therefore a low life expectancy. With in migration to the US tightly controlled but in constant motion, their HDI could be pulled down to 4th. As Norway and Australia and the Netherlands are not the main destination for refugees, their HDI could be higher.   

Cody Price's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:49 AM

The HDI is the human development index which ranks countries in many different aspects. The higher the country the more developed and modern it is. The least amount of death and the longest lives are here. It is more stable the higher the country.

 

This relates to the topic in unit 6 of HDI. this map shows the basic HDIS of the world and the patterns formed by the HDI layout of the world. 

Anna Sasaki's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:04 AM

This map shows the Human Development Index around the world. The HDI depends on a set list of variables, ranking them from 1st to last. Nations considered to be "Western" are more developed than nations in regions such as Africa and Asia, although all nations are slowly but steadily developing, improving their Human Development Index ranking.

The HDI shows development in nations, although leaving out Inequality factors. This map also allows us to see spatially what regions tend to be more developed as well as developing.

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Rust Belt cities: to avoid more shrinkage, protect & strengthen the core | Kaid Benfield's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC

Rust Belt cities: to avoid more shrinkage, protect & strengthen the core | Kaid Benfield's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it
  For some time, I have been on record as believing that the problem with former industrial cities that have lost population isn’t just the changing economy.  It’s also a failure to address suburban sprawl.  A close look at population...

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The Container that Moves the Global Economy

The Container that Moves the Global Economy | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it
The unsung hero of the global economy: the shipping container.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 5, 2014 11:50 PM

We discussed how the container has transformed the global economy. These videos show how a simple tee shirt is made from cotton in the US, labor in Columbia, Indonesia, and Bangladesh. In the 1950s Malcolm McLean developed the first shipping container industry and transformed the global economy. Due to the fact that these containers can hold some many items, shipping goods from place to place makes manufacturing a global process. Economic geographies were completely revamped by the innovation of McLean, now a making a tee shirt connects the economies of many nations. A piece of clothing being sold in the United States now is connected to labor across the globe. 

Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 5, 2015 4:54 PM

Tracking the commodity of the T-shirt from cotton to retail.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 2016 8:18 AM


NPR's Planet Money has produced an 8-part series following the commodity chain of the T-Shirt.  This series explores cotton production, textile mills, sweatshops, outsourcing and in this podcast, the transportation infrastructure that moves goods globally.  This podcast touches on the same topic as one of my favorite TED talks, how containerization enabled globalization.   

 

Tags:  transportation, industry, economic, globalization, technology, podcast.


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Clegg: Girls' education is the best cure for poverty

Clegg: Girls' education is the best cure for poverty | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it
On his first visit to sub-Saharan Africa ahead of the G8 in the UK this summer, Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg writes exclusively for girleffect.org about why girls hold the key to breaking the cycle of poverty...

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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."


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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 5:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

Logan Haller's curator insight, May 25, 2015 9:51 PM

This article has to do with unit 6 because it deals with development.This article explains how 30 million people work as forced labors, forced child soldiers,  forced brides and many other forced things. The map illustrates spatial patterns on economic and cultural factors on where the people enslaved are. The map shows that India is 1.1% enslaved.People say that fair trade and not free trade will lead to sustainable economic growth and lower social injustice. Two questions asked by the article is what realistically can we do to lessen slavery in the world today, and how our our own spending habits part of the system. The article also includes a video on some of the ways the slaves are treated poorly .

8A JonathanS's curator insight, February 9, 7:19 AM

https://geographyeducation.org/courses/regional-geography-geog-400/modern-slavery/

 

This article describes when people in Africa are victims of modern day slavery. It tells us how people are forced into working long long hours a day with no breaks, barely any food or water and a very unsafe working environment. Some examples of what these poor people are forced into working as are laborers, prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides. Many people are also forced into marriages and illegal mining and smuggling of goods across borders . There are currently about 30 million modern day slaves all over the world. Their mostly in large parts of Africa and most of India. There's also some in Europe and in the U.S. One of the most unsafe working environment these slaves are forced into working in are the illegal mining projects. Their forced to work long hours in a mine that could collapse any second with nothing but a cheap flashlight tied to their head and a shovel or spade. 

 

I think this article connects to what were working on in class about modern slavery and Africa. I think this is very sad because I think everybody has the right to do what they feel like and deserve their freedom just like most people. This is extremely unfair and I think that more people should try and do something about it. Of course there are already loads of people trying to prevent this issue from spreading and I think it's a very kind and respectful thing to do. I did learn a lot from this article tho and the TED talk. One thing I learned was that this problem mostly appears in Africa. I honestly though that Asia and more parts of South America would have this issue as well. So yes, I learned quite a lot from this and I think that it was a good article with lots of useful information and I got a lot of emotional feelings from seeing the video.

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HDI Map

HDI Map | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it

"Our mission is to provide easy-to-use, yet methodologically sound tools for understanding well being and opportunity in America and to simulate fact-based dialogue about issues we all care about: health, education and income. "


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Mrs. B's curator insight, November 18, 2013 9:08 AM

Love how this dissaggregates the data to individual states. What are the states with the highest HDI and why?

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:00 PM

A wonderful tool to explore and play around with demography, income, etc. across the U.S.  It would be great if you could dial in on only coastal counties to compare coastal vs. inland regions of the U.S.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 3, 2014 10:32 PM

HDI...Chapter 9 material HUGGERS!

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A hopeful continent

A hopeful continent | Unit 5 and 6 (Development and Industrialization) | Scoop.it
THREE STUDENTS ARE hunched over an iPad at a beach café on Senegal’s Cap-Vert peninsula, the westernmost tip of the world’s poorest continent. They are reading...

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Environmentally Conscience Manufacturing

Levi Strauss & Co. believes that water is a precious resource and everyone should do their part to lead a more WaterLess lifestyle. Find out more about our w...

 

More and more companies are strategically rethinking manufacturing to be less harmful to the environment.  There are sound economic, cultural, marketing and sustainability reasons for rethinking the manufacturing process.  In the past Levi's used more than 11 gallons to produce 1 pair of jeans to get that aesthetic look just right...this video looks at the restructuring process to make these essentially 'waterless' jeans. 


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