Unit 6 (Agriculture)
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Unit 6 (Agriculture)
Agriculture and Land Use
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Urban chicken farming takes dinner from backyard to plate - WBRC

Urban chicken farming takes dinner from backyard to plate - WBRC | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Urban chicken farming takes dinner from backyard to plateWBRC(RNN) - While some people grow corn, carrots and cucumbers in home gardens, others prefer to raise something a little more lively in their backyards.

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Why clean water is key to keeping girls in school

Why clean water is key to keeping girls in school | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
A lack of safe running water means many girls drop out of school when they start menstruation, but a new project is looking to fix that

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World’s 100 richest earned enough in 2012 to end global poverty 4 times over — RT

World’s 100 richest earned enough in 2012 to end global poverty 4 times over — RT | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
The world's 100 richest people earned a stunning total of $240 billion in 2012 – enough money to end extreme poverty worldwide four times over, Oxfam has revealed, adding that the global economic crisis is further enriching the super-rich.

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Food Machine

Food Machine | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

UPDATE: The PBS episode "Food Machine" premiered on April 11th, 2012 on the series "America Revealed."  Now the episode is available online. 

 

"Over the past century, an American industrial revolution has given rise to the biggest, most productive food machine the world has ever known.  In this episode, host Yul Kwon explores how this machine feeds nearly 300 million Americans every day. He discovers engineering marvels we’ve created by putting nature to work and takes a look at the costs of our insatiable appetite on our health and environment.  For the first time in human history, less than 2% of the population can feed the other 98%." 


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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:46 PM

This is a great video covering our industrial agricultural complex

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 5:13 PM

The Industrial Revolution really changed things, but it is hardly an improvement, because so many people are without the benefits of the rich percentage.  People's roles are becoming solid components that are entirely replacable and part of the machine rather than becoming creative- and by creative, I don't just mean artsy.  I think that the Research and Development part of any machine entity is the part that allows it to adapt and modify in order to change for the better and the greater good.  I look at humans as an alien species inhabiting a planet, and I could make the analogy to a college fraternity.   The planet is a mess, people try to make a buck off each other at every given opportunity, and I particularly dislike that the rich people band together like frat brothers, instead of giving less-priveledged persons the opportunity to attain equal status.  I don't think like everyone else, but I do make efforts to partake in realistic activism to cause change for the betterment of all beings- human or not.  I do believe in predestination, and that everything around us is a material and spiritual echo from the dawn of creation, but I also believe that the flaws present today will disappear tomorrow through courses of events where chosen people will alter the formation of the future, for the benefit of all beings.  Right now, with people undertipping pizza delivery men, and not donating the optional dollar at stop and shop, it is the flawed 'today' phase of the timeline, but the Industrial Revolution has made it easier for society to embrace component roles, however replacable or expendable, and that in the end will achieve greater contentment and universal success.

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Agriculture is Everywhere

Farmers Fight is a student-led initiative to reconnect American society to the world of agriculture. Beginning with university students, Farmers Fight encour...

 

This video makes several important points about agricultural production within our modernized world, things that often go unnoticed and taken for granted.  Food for thought. 


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:58 AM

The video brings attention to the complex process that brings food, and sheets, into our lives. Agriculture is often overlooked and undesirable. The video gives a young face to agriculture.

 

Payton Sidney Dinwiddie 's curator insight, October 25, 2014 6:27 PM

I like this article because it shows that most of the things we do is related to agriculture there are so many things we take for granted  and things that people dont recongnize have to deal with agriculture its almost surprising after watching this I believe that people who do agriculture need more respect

Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, December 1, 2014 5:11 AM

Agriculture involves everyone. People today dont think about where their food comes from. They don't think about how their food is made. Which is all agriculture.  Now agriculture has faded where no one remembers it still exists. Agriculture is something we include in our daizly lives. The big process of food. 

I.C.

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Agribusiness Suffers 'Pink Slime' Fallout

Agribusiness Suffers 'Pink Slime' Fallout | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Beef Products Inc. permanently closed its plants at Waterloo and two other locations on Monday, saying it could not overcome the damage from a controversy over beef trimmings. The closings will affect 650 workers, including 220 in Waterloo.

 

This is an interesting issue coming out of Iowa. The governor and former governor (the current Secretary of Agriculture) have been putting on a full-court press of positive PR for "pink slime." How does this decision impact the local agriculture industries?  What other impacts will this plant closure have beyond agriculture?  While the market compel agribusiness to reform long term?

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Investing in Diversity - a view of IRRI's International Rice Genebank

For 10 years I had the great privilege to lead the genetic resources program at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines, and work...

 

A lengthy clip (I would only show the first 4 minutes with a class) that demonstrates the vast amount of scientific energy focused on agriculture.  Unspoken is the vast amount of resources invested in genetically modified organism that is leading to a loss of genetic biodiversity that poses some potential risks for our most important crops. 


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Kara Charboneau's comment, March 11, 2013 7:48 AM
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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States.

 

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape? 


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:44 PM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:59 AM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.
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Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 vs 2010 | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
How we die (in one chart)...

 

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer) What are the geographic factors that influence these shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society?  Has anything worsened?  How come?  

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Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:50 PM

The thing that is positive about this infograph on how we die, is that our mortality rate has indeed gone down a whole lot since 1900. As the article states, we have become more aware of the bacteria taht surrounds us and have learned to be more clean because of it. This has surely cut down the rate in which people die by infectious diseases. However, it is interesting to see that heart diseases remains in one of the top ways that we die, even to this day. Accident deaths have also significantly dropped, probably due to the safety measures taken in the workplaces, or the technological advances that have made fighting wars, less deadly than during the 1900s. 

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Agriculture: Back to the Start

Coldplay's haunting classic 'The Scientist' is performed by country music legend Willie Nelson for the soundtrack of the short film entitled, "Back to the St...

 

Sure this is an animated commercial for Chipotle Grill, but this perfectly encapsulates the beliefs, values and ethics that underscore the organic farming movement. 


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Aurora Rider's curator insight, October 24, 2014 10:14 AM

Sure this is a Chipotle commercial but is does a good job at showing the belief that we should go back to the old way of farming. The video shows a family farm being taken over by what appears to be some big corporation. Upon being taken over, the animals are confined in small compartments and injected by what appears to be antibiotics and some other unknown substance. The factories they are sent to are polluting the place. The farmer sees all of this and decides to go back to the start.

jada_chace's curator insight, October 26, 2014 7:17 PM

In the video it shows how the world has evolved in the way that humans take action on Mother Nature’s ways. In the beginning, there was a small family farm that was growing crops and animals. Shortly after that, it showed how small family farms are being taken over by the big agribusinesses. In today’s society that tends to happen more and more, which can be both good and bad on our economy. Unless people don’t make a change about the way we treat our food, nothing in our economy is going to get better. 

Cassie Brannan's curator insight, December 9, 2014 10:21 PM

This animated film shows you what agriculture is really like. Sometimes it is difficult to be a farmer because of all of the climate changes. When the weather changes off and on, it can kill the crops, making it harder for farmers to find food. So as you can see, farmers go through a lot and it take a lot of hard work to be a successful farmer.

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Produce Calendars: Understanding Agriculture

Produce Calendars: Understanding Agriculture | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

These three charts (Fruit, Vegetable and Herbs) are an excellent reasource for teaching about agriculture and food systems.  Many cultural festivals and  traditions revolve around the seasonal availability of crops and many modern eating trends often call for a return eating foods within their season.    


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Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:15 PM

I feel that when you do consume foods within their season of growth it tastes better. I like to believe that because they are in season, it is cheaper to buy them because they are in abundance but it don't think that is the case. Although there is the push to try to eat the foods within their seasons, it is probably not likely to happen since we live in a global economy, that urges food to be made regardless of what season they are best grown in. 

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Understanding "Eat Local"

Understanding "Eat Local" | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

This Oregon-based infographic succinctly summarizes the local food movement and taps into the cultural ethos that permeates the growing number of consumers that are demanding more home-grown products.


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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


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Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 2015 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:20 PM

Quinoa will be a staple for generations to come and the countries of Peru, Bolivia, Uruguay and Argentina would do well to provide all the assistance to the farming community in their respective countries. This product is like New Age rice, it provides multiple benefits to health conscious consumers such as protein, fiber, and a "full" feeling when consumed. Any recipe that calls for a rice base can incorporate Quinoa just as easily and it tastes great. being a bit of a health freak, I use Quinoa in my diet and it works.

While the success of the grain has made it less accessible price-wise to those who grow it, it should provide for a greater economic benefit for years to come, lifting a population from near poverty levels to hopefully one of a strong and vibrant middle class.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 2, 2015 3:43 PM

Quinoa has been grown in the high mountains of the Andes for decades and has been a localized food for the population. As their health benefits became known in to the global community, the demands for them increases. This made it difficult for the locals to find cheap Quinoa, which is normally eaten in their diet. I feel that it is unfair for the locals to have seek new source of food alternatives now that their healthy Quinoa will become more expensive as the demand for it goes up.

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Backyard Bunnies Are the New Urban Chickens

Backyard Bunnies Are the New Urban Chickens | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Backyard Bunnies Are the New Urban Chickens (http://t.co/dhS3LpsP http://t.co/C54VpNao)

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Are we paving over our natural wealth?

Are we paving over our natural wealth? | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
If we value local food and want to maintain the critical benefits that nature provides, we must put food and water first.

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McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India

McDonald's Goes Vegetarian — In India | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
McDonald's plans to open the first in a series of all-vegetarian restaurants in India next year. But rest assured, in most locations around the world, meat will stay on the menu.

 

Many of the most successful global companies or brands use highly regional variations that are attuned to local cultural norms and customs.  The McAloo Tikki burger— which uses a spicy, fried potato-based patty — is the Indian McDonald's top seller.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the forces that lead towards an accelaration of human connectivity around the globe?  What are the postive impacts of this increased connectivity?  What are some negative impacts?  Are these impacts the same in all places?  Explain. 

 

Tags: Globalization, food, culture, unit 3 culture and SouthAsia.


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Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 9, 2015 9:52 PM

When you typically think of a McDonald's, vegetarian is not what comes to mind. India plans on opening it's first vegetarian McDonald's since the majority of the population just simply does not even eat meat. There are already 271 of this restaurant in India already but they are looking for a new growth. Many Hindu's and Muslims don't eat pork, or cows because it is sacred to them. More chicken and vegetables will be served at this new restaurant and the older restaurants menus are 50% vegetarian. This is interesting to see because you do not think of fast food places being healthy at all. I think this is a great idea having different option for individuals who don't eat certain things. This is definitely going to be an attraction for not just people living in India but for tourists as well. It'll be a fun story to tell to say that you went to an all vegetarian McDonald's!

Jacob Conklin's curator insight, May 6, 2015 3:50 PM

It is often said that food is one of the best identifiers of a culture. What better way to define America than McDonalds, right? However, fueled by globalization, McDonalds has moved to several different countries around the world, including India. For religious reasons, the traditional American menu wouldn't fit well in the Indian diet, as most hindu people wouldn't jump at the chance to eat a quarter pound of greasy cow. Globalization and a desire for economic profit has fueled a change in the McDonalds menu in India as well as other countries. In order to succeed in the global market, a comp any must be willing to change to appeal to a more diverse client base. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 6:51 AM

McDonald's going vegetarian, would be a unimaginable concept in the United States. The United States like most western nations, is addicted to meat. The United States prefers hamburgers over salads. Our culture has been raised on that addiction. India is a far more vegetarian society. Twenty to forty two percent of the population of India classifies themselves as vegetarians. While not a majority, they are a sizeable minority within India. McDonalds is adapting its menu to fit with the culture of its consumers. For the Indian business model, this move makes sense. McDonalds presence in India speaks to increased global connectivity. The forces of globalization have brought the world closer together. There are few isolated areas of the world left to ponder. We are now living in an age of connectivity. Almost every major business is now located across the glove. The positive impacts of this trend are that we as westerners are exposed to diverse cultures and influences. The negative impacts are there are few unexplored regions of the world still remaining. The frontiers have all but disappeared.

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Food, Nutrition and Geography

Peter Menzel's beautiful photography and our Hungry Planet...

 

This video is a fascinating portal into global food systems and how globalization is impacting local foods.  He traveled around the world to see what families eat in a given week, and how much all the food cost and where it can from.  Many wealthy countries exhibit poor nutritional habits (eating food high in fat, sugar and salt) while some in poorer people have a very balanced diet.  This leads him to describe the 'Nutritional Transition.'  Warning before showing in class: there are brief instances of non-sexualized nudity in the video. 


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This little piggy is going to China

This little piggy is going to China | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

This photoblog will also link you to a full article and video that explains how the American pork industry is supplying China's demand for protein as globalization forces (among others) has led the Chinese consumers to eat 10% more meat than they did just 5 years ago.  WHat impact will this have on American agriculture?  How to we explain fo the rise in meat demand in China?    


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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:28 PM

Read the linked article. How is China dealing with its increasing appitite for meat?

Paige McClatchy's curator insight, December 14, 2013 5:30 PM

Chinese farmers cannot keep with with Chinese demand from pork, so America is stepping in to fill the gap. The globalization of American pork seems like it would benefit American farmers and Chinese consumers, but the environmental cost of raising so many extra pigs on American land must be considered, as well as transportation costs to ship it to China.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:35 PM

We never focus on the goods leaving the United States and being imported to China. American pork is filling the demand in China and because globalization has made it cheap to ship exports, China is responding by eating more pork because it is affordable. This is important in keeping American exporting business afloat. There are plenty of pigs in the US to provide large numbers to foreign countries. I also find it interesting that what Americans would consider a staple of so called "Chinese food" is being exported from the US. 

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NASA Earth Observatory - Vegetation Index

The NDVI (Normalized Digital Vegetation Index) is on of the primary methods for detecting healthy vegetation using satellite imagery.  This also serves as a useful way to distinguish between distinct ecological and agricultural regions and the temporal patterns of planting seasons.  

 

This video was found on a site titled "Explorations in agricultural research" with many great links http://zerogravitygardening.blogspot.com/


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How The Russians Saved America's Sunflower

It's one of the few food crops that actually originated in North America. But the sunflower was just a pretty diversion until Soviet breeders came up with oil-rich varieties that became a staple.

 

This podcast discusses the foods that are native to the U.S., diffusion of species and the advantages of sunflower oil in the making of potato chips.  All of these become salient points for enhancing spatial thinking, understanding geographic patterns and processes.  


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:54 PM

This is an interesting video because it explains how an American grown food is getting help from overseas and it just shows how important geography is to the betterment of world foods.

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Dan Barber: How I fell in love with a fish

Chef Dan Barber squares off with a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu.

 

This is a compelling analysis of the agricultural food system through the case-study of fish farms.  If we fish the seas like we clear-cut forests, the biodiversity of the world's waters will be seriously depleted.  That has been the economic model for fishing for hundreds of years and it is obviously not sustainable given the growing population and demand for fish.   However, not all "sustainable" fish farming businesses are equal, and this TED talk demonstrates some of the best practices to restructure the food industry for the best food and environmental results.


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EnviroJMS's curator insight, September 18, 2013 7:29 AM

This is an interesting video on sustainable fish farming, it might be helpful to someone who wants to write about sustainable farming. Apologies, it is quite long

 

Aleksandre da Silva

 

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Organic farming may be outgrowing its ideals

Organic farming may be outgrowing its ideals | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Even as more Americans buy foods labeled organic, the products are moving away from a traditional emphasis on local growing and limited environmental strain.

 

Organic farming has changed for the years; it is not just the small private farms of yesteryear.  How have increasing consumer demand, economies of scale and expanding markets reshaped the geographic patterns of organic farming?  How is the transportation of agricultural products reconfiguring the networks?   


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Learn about your Food

Learn about your Food | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

Many consumers don't know much about the production of their food.  Is your food Genetically modified?  Organically produced?  Learn how to know.   


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Grocery Store Wars

Not long ago in a supermarket not so far away. Help fight the dark side of the farm. Rate the film, favorite the film, comment the film and subscribe to our ...

 

This is horribly cheesy and from an incredibly biased perspective, but it does embody how many see the organic movement (and is quite entertaining for old Star Wars buffs like me). 


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