Unit 6 (Agriculture)
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The Geography of Hunger and Food Insecurity

Why are some communities more vulnerable to hunger and famine? There are many reasons, which together add up to food insecurity, the world's no.1 health risk...

 

Excellent summary of the geographic factors that lead to food insecurity and hunger and the main ways NGO's are trying to combat the issues.   This is an incredibly complex problem that, at it's heart, is a geographic issue that can challenge student to synthesize information and make the connections between topics.  


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 1:02 AM
This is a incredible clip that does challenge students to synthesize information and make the connections between topics, but it can also help students to realize making a difference at a early age is important. I learned an abundance of facts just from watching, it was informative and intriguing. As I was watching the video I was thinking of ways it can be incorporated into the classroom. This video could get students to learn about the world's number one health risk. Incorporating it into the classroom by holding a food drive, or having a school wide fundraiser to donate to the British Red Cross is also another way to help. Getting our future minds informed and helping the community will make an impact in the future.
Unit 6 (Agriculture)
Agriculture and Land Use
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Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk

Inside The Indiana Megadairy Making Coca-Cola's New Milk | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Coca-Cola got a lot of attention in November when it announced it was going into the milk business. In fact, its extra-nutritious milk product was invented by some dairy farmers in Indiana.

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Brian Wilk's curator insight, January 22, 6:38 PM

I work for PepsiCo and Coca-Cola needed to do this to stay competitive with us. We distribute Muscle Milk and have had a head start on this growing beverage segment for the consumer looking for protein. Hopefully KO can generate a successful product and challenge their main rivals to come up with a better product so that the consumer can win. Our product is also shelf stable and could be a viable alternative to help with the war on hunger in less developed countries. Here's hoping for KO to be in the game and for PEP to rise to the challenge!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, January 23, 12:25 PM

unit 5

Norka McAlister's curator insight, February 2, 5:11 PM

As the main producer of certain crops and hogs, the state of Indiana has been chosen by Coca-Cola to spearhead a new innovative project regarding an improved flavor of milk in the future. Indiana’s prime location and abundance of raw materials positively contributed to the decision to establish the project’s headquarters in this state. As a result, it is expected that this innovation will boost Indiana’s economy and create for jobs and advancements in technology. This project allows Coca-Cola the opportunity to expand its brand and offer healthier beverage options to the consumer.

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How to feed 7 billion of us without ruining the planet

How to feed 7 billion of us without ruining the planet | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
A new study says feeding all 7 billion of us is possible with the resources at hand -- we'll just have to rethink how and where we're farming.

 

Excellent article from The Grist summarising a new Nature study on how are current industrialised farming system is failing the feed the world and what can be done about it.


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FAO report: "Energy-smart" agriculture needed to escape fossil fuel trap

FAO report:  "Energy-smart" agriculture needed to escape fossil fuel trap | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

High and fluctuating prices of fossil fuels and doubts regarding their future availability mean that agri-food systems need to shift to an "energy-smart" model, according to the report Energy-Smart Food for People and Climate.

 

Mandatory reading for all policymakers involved in the debate on the European Common Agricultural Policy reform.


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Why Agriculture Needs to Catch Up on Climate Change Action

Why Agriculture Needs to Catch Up on Climate Change Action | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Agriculture is one of the first sectors that will be seriously affected by climate change, yet the sector is far behind in quantifying and reducing its carbon footprint.

 

Good article from GreenBiz.com.


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The world is closer to a food crisis than most people realise

The world is closer to a food crisis than most people realise | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Lester R.Brown: Unless we move quickly to adopt new population, energy, and water policies, the goal of eradicating hunger will remain just that...

 

Another warning but no one is listening until it is too late and then we will get the "free" rock concerts again.


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Eli Levine's curator insight, March 11, 2014 1:29 PM

This should be truly terrifying to thsoe who hold political and social power at our present juncture.

 

Yet what are they doing to mitigate the problems of these impending crises, other than to prepare civilization for marshal law?  How are they actually helping others (and themselves) through the constant resorting to the jack-boot?

 

Not very enlightened.

 

Not every inspired.


Not very original.

 

Think abouti it.

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5 reasons to upgrade technology

5 reasons to upgrade technology | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Adam Gittins, HTS Ag, lists five reasons why you should upgrade your older equipment with the latest precision ag technology.
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Tweet from @StateDept

Tweet from @StateDept | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Tomorrow is #WorldWaterDay! Did you know agriculture and food production accounts for 70% of global water use? http://t.co/ELPfR5EpWi
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Farming in America: 'There's a growing discontent' - CNBC.com

Farming in America: 'There's a growing discontent' - CNBC.com | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
CNBC.com Farming in America: 'There's a growing discontent' CNBC.com "We have a farming model now that is antagonistic to the enjoyment of watching seeds grow and seeing a new born animal," said the 26-year-old Kempf, who is chief executive of...
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Nanomaterials in fertilizer products could threaten soil health, agriculture | Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

Nanomaterials in fertilizer products could threaten soil health, agriculture | Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

"“In light of published research, the Obama administration should institute an immediate moratorium on fertilizing with biosolids from sewage treatment plants near nanomaterial fabrication facilities. A moratorium would give researchers time to determine whether nanomaterials in soil can be made safe and to research alternatives to building soil heath, rather than depending on fertilization with biosolids.” says IATP’s Dr. Steve Suppan.

Over time, the report explains, nanomaterials in these agricultural inputs can accumulate and harm soil health. More research is urgently needed to adequately understand possible long-term impacts of nanotechnology.

“As agri-nanotechnology rapidly enters the market, can soil health and everything that depends on it can be sustained without regulation?” asks Suppan. “That’s the question regulators, researchers and anyone involved in our food system should be asking themselves.”

The report also details risks specific to farmers and farmworkers applying dried biosolids that incorporate nanomaterials, including inflammation of the lungs, fibrosis and other toxicological impacts."

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Agriculture Co. WordPress Template for Business Websites

Agriculture Co. WordPress Template for Business Websites | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Agricultural Co WordPress Template is a modern responsive theme with Bootstrap and Cherry Framework for making agricultural business websites.

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Rethinking Agriculture

"Growing Power is a national nonprofit organization and land trust supporting people from diverse backgrounds, and the environments in which they live, by helping to provide equal access to healthy, high-quality, safe and affordable food for people in all communities."

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:56 AM

with the increasing numbers of urban citizens in years to come the key to success in the city will be its ability to adapted to its growing enviroment. It would be nearly impossible for cities to exsit in the future with the current ways of agriculuture, there needs to be a change in the way things are done. Thats why this next gen way of agriculuture is going to take off in urban areas. with the ability to have full farms on rooftops the city will be able to self sustain itself more properly than it does in current times.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:40 PM

For the past three years I have had the luxury of having a garden in my backyard, it is a lot of work but there is nothing better than knowing where my food is coming from. I enjoy going in my backyard and being able to grab vegetables whenever I need them. I also go to farmers markets for vegetables that I don't grow in my own garden.  I would defeniately support local people to get good quality food. 

Lauren Shigemasa's curator insight, January 23, 2014 1:28 AM

a powerful way to increase access to healthy foods! this organization called Growing Power is using urban gardening not only to create a sustainable food source for its neighbors, but also provides a system so we can donate and send a week's worth of fresh fruit/vegetables to any surrounding community in need. so amazing!

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Urban chicken farming takes dinner from backyard to plate - WBRC

Urban chicken farming takes dinner from backyard to plate - WBRC | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Urban chicken farming takes dinner from backyard to plateWBRC(RNN) - While some people grow corn, carrots and cucumbers in home gardens, others prefer to raise something a little more lively in their backyards.

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How American Agriculture Works

How American Agriculture Works | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
There really are two different Americas: the heartland, and the coasts....

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 4:46 PM

My uncles in Iowa grow corn for ethanol.  They have a small crop where they grow corn they consume.  It is literally the best corn I've ever had.  I'm actually surprised Rhode Island produces almost $4mil in sweet corn.  I'm amazed that Mass produces $100 mil in cranberries.  I've seen a few cranberry bogs close down.  We produce so much why can't we actually feed everyone?  

Diane Johnson's curator insight, January 28, 8:47 PM

Useful data for sustainability discussions

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2:38 PM

These maps are interesting, in the fact that the heartland of the United States differs so much from either coast.  Both the coasts, as seen in the first map grow fruits and vegetables.  The center of the country grows wheat, and wheat is the dominant  crop of the country.  This might account for the reason why fruits and vegetables are more expensive than grain based products.  The second map helps to drive home this point even further, of how different the coasts are from the heartland.  What I also thought was funny, however, was the author's comment that it looks like an electoral map.  Perhaps, the reason heartland states tend to side with each other and republicans is because of shared interests in the political arena.

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New Report: Achieving Food Security in the Face of Climate Change

New Report: Achieving Food Security in the Face of Climate Change | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

Interesting new report from the Commission on Sustainable Agriculture and Climate Change with recommendations for policymakers.


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The bugs that ate Monsanto

The bugs that ate Monsanto | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
First Roundup-resistant superweeds, and now corn rootworms, a common pest, have grown resistant to Monsanto's Bt corn. The result is bad for more than just the company's stock prices.

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How to Make the Food System More Energy Efficient

Changes in agriculture, policy and personal behaviors can reduce the energy a nation uses to feed itself and the greenhouse gases it emits...

 

Great recent article from Scientific American.


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Record cereal prices stoke fears of global food crisis

Record cereal prices stoke fears of global food crisis | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Severe drought in US - largest exporter of corn, soya beans and wheat - pushes up prices and revives memories of 2007-08 riots...

 

This recurrence of the global food crisis caused either by rising commodity prices or extreme weather events related to climate change is a strong indicator of the validity of John Michael Greer's theory of the catabolic collapse of civilisations.


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The Farm Bill: What's in it for Organic Agriculture - Farm Futures

The Farm Bill: What's in it for Organic Agriculture - Farm Futures | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
The Farm Bill: What's in it for Organic Agriculture Farm Futures The organic agriculture industry is growing at a record pace as more than 25,000 certified organic operations in 120 countries register with the USDA Ag Marketing Service – a trend...
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Growing use of drones poised to transform agriculture - USA TODAY

Growing use of drones poised to transform agriculture - USA TODAY | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Wall Street Journal Growing use of drones poised to transform agriculture USA TODAY That's because agriculture operations span large distances and are mostly free of privacy and safety concerns that have dogged the use of these aerial high-fliers...
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Technology and Agriculture - India

Technology and Agriculture - India | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
A short report on Technology and Agriculture based in India.

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How cities can embrace urban agriculture and weaken the grip of 'big food'

How cities can embrace urban agriculture and weaken the grip of 'big food' | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
Many city governments around the world are encouraging agriculture in urban areas--so long as it stays small scale and doesn't challenge the status quo.

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Urban Agriculture: Industrial-Sized Rooftop Farm Planned for Berlin

Urban Agriculture: Industrial-Sized Rooftop Farm Planned for Berlin | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it
It is hardly a logical spot for a farm, but three Berliners have earmarked a massive former factory roof for an unusual urban agriculture venture.

 

Urban agriculture within an industrial landscape is reshaping our cities, food systems and rural areas. What economic factors are making this happen?  What cultural factors explain the growth of this phenomenon?  


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Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 10, 2014 10:19 AM

I wonder what Von Thunen would think of this!

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Precipitation Mapping

Precipitation Mapping | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 21, 2013 3:32 PM

In New Hampshire they are doing great work to make mapping data useful in the classroom.  This site is one that they use to show how students can map locally relevant data from an online data set.  CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network)  is a crowd-sourced network that gathers North American precipitation data.  The data (especially the total precipitation summary) can be easily copied into as spread sheet and saved as a CSV file (which can be uploaded to ArcGIS online).


Tagsmapping, CSV, water, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 30, 2014 9:42 PM

This is  COCORAHS. people from different places put this measurement tools to measure the rain fall, and it is different everywhere. this is cool in my opinion.

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Geography of Quinoa

Geography of Quinoa | Unit 6 (Agriculture) | Scoop.it

"The popularity of Quinoa has grown exponentially among the health-conscious food consumers in the developed economies of the world.  Quinoa (pronounced KEEN-wah) is rich in protein and is a better grain for those seeking to lose weight.  Quinoa has historically be rather limited but this diffusion is restructuring the geographic patterns of many places." 


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 12:15 PM

Quinoa has gone from a traditional food only consumed by those living in the Andes Mountains to a global phenomenon. Historically, Quinoa was consumed by locals in the Andes Mountains in order to supplement their diet. Recently, it has developed a reputation as a super food, with people claiming that it can help lose weight and has tremendous health benefits. While this may be true, food fads such as this have the potential to greatly affect the historic growers. Since its boom on the global market, Quinoa has become incredibly expensive. The people that once depended on it for sustenance can no longer afford it, thus leading to economic and food issues in these localities. It is important to understand that these exotic, popular foods can maim entire ways of life where the foods were once just foods, and not super foods. 

David Lizotte's curator insight, February 9, 5:51 PM

This article was short so I clicked on the link that directed me to an Al Jazeera article, which went more in depth in this issue. My scoop reflects information gained from both articles. 

It is nice to see the world taking notice of such a nutritionally rich grain, that being quinoa. The world has many poor regions that in turn produce malnourished people, the production of quinoa on a global scale seems to benefit many. Yet, on a local more personal level there are people suffering from the demand/price boom. 

Local Bolivian residents, mostly surrounding the quinoa production regions (Andes) are suffering from the rising price of Quinoa. I find this to be outrageous. Regions can provide enough quinoa for the world yet overlook the sales of residents, whom have been valuing quinoa for generations upon generations. Now there are many whom cant afford it. 

The mass consumption of quinoa has now created mass production of the crop. This in turn is affecting the Nitrogen level of soil in certain regions, creating rifts amongst landowners (land owned due to native beliefs), and neglect of certain business men in regards to there native lands. The industry is changing the landscape and affecting the culture of rural regions as a whole. 

In response to the increased malnourishment of Bolivian citizens throughout the nation the government has issued a law declaring the children and pregnant woman being issued quinoa on a regular basis. This in turn provides nourishment these people need on a daily schedule. This is good progress however it doesn't pertain to the nation as a whole and also it only benefits the people receiving the quinoa for a period of time (end of pregnancy, older age/no longer a child). If Boliva wants to take part in global distribution of this crop it needs to tend to its own borders and secure a stable environment amongst its population. Its producing a product that battles malnourishment, no need for an immense population of people being malnourished throughout the general area. Very ironic. 

 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, February 9, 10:10 PM

Quinoa appears to be originated as grain crop for edible seeds in parts of Bolivia, Argentina, Peru and along to Andes Mountain. However, they increase the crop value as it spreads to other areas of the world such as Europe and United States. One thing that I wonder is that if the production is going to be popular in any region other than South America but manufacturing regions started on eastern United States and they spread overseas to Europe. I wonder if production of Quinoa will spread to other continents. Believe it or not, it has partially spread to small parts of southwestern Europe.