All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
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All about water, the oceans, environmental issues
Interesting stories about scuba divers, products, environment, water stories Oceans
Curated by Kathy Dowsett
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Alert Diver | DAN MEMBER PROFILE: Jill Heinerth

Alert Diver | DAN MEMBER PROFILE: Jill Heinerth | All about water, the oceans, environmental issues | Scoop.it

Jill Heinerth has dived deeper in caves than any woman in history. She has explored and photographed Antarctic icebergs and subterranean wonders beneath Mexican jungles and Siberian mountains. Heinerth was a key member of expeditions of the National Geographic Society, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Texas A&M University, Bahamas Caves Research Foundation, the U.S. Deep Cave Diving Team and many others. Among her explorations is a two-month project diving a rebreather for up to three hours at a time in an Antarctic ice cave in a 1.8-knot current. Heinerth's dive expeditions are major endeavors that involve an enormous amount of equipment and resources; the project she did in Antarctica with National Geographic had a budget of nearly a million dollars. In January 2012, Heinerth led a team of cave divers, scientists, journalists and Enduro motorbike riders on an expedition in North Africa that will be covered in National Geographic

Kathy Dowsett's insight:

Jill is an amazing women! kirkscubagear is a huge fan!

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Rebreather Fatalities | DIVER magazine

Rebreather Fatalities | DIVER magazine | All about water, the oceans, environmental issues | Scoop.it

When diving open circuit you are virtually always okay if you have gas to breathe.  This stops being true when you move into technical diving where breathing your decompression gas too deep can kill you from an oxygen (O2) seizure and breathing your bottom gas for a deep trimix dive too shallow can kill you from hypoxia.  When diving a rebreather the gas you are breathing can kill you if the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas is too high or too low, or if the partial pressure of carbon dioxide is too high.  Experienced open circuit divers intuitively believe that as long as they have gas to breathe they are okay and as a result often forget to monitor the partial pressure of oxygen (pO2) in the breathing loop on a rebreather.  This is frequently a factor in rebreather accidents.

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