Understanding by Design
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To Teach Effective Writing, Model Effective Writing

To Teach Effective Writing, Model Effective Writing | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it
When I was a kid, every weekend, my parents would drive me to Loon Mountain in New Hampshire to master the sport of skiing -- and downhill racing, in particular. On the chairlift, my instructors woul
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Number four is an interesting idea that the kids would love.

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Starting with the End in Mind | CTQ

Starting with the End in Mind | CTQ | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it

Starting with the end in mind has become a mantra for lesson planning.  Sometimes called “Backward Planning,” or “Lesson Design,” this technique is being exposed to teachers in professional development sessions for years. I first read about backward planning through Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe's work.


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Adrian Bertolini's curator insight, July 13, 2013 10:29 PM

In reality, as in the one we live in rather than the imaginary world education systems like to create at times, people are effective when they plan with the end in mind. It is how we work as human beings. So why not structure learning that way?

Rim Riahi's curator insight, July 14, 2013 12:25 AM

Starting with the end in mind has become a mantra for lesson planning.  Sometimes called “Backward Planning,” or “Lesson Design,” this technique is being exposed to teachers in professional development sessions for years.

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Teaching for Understanding

Teaching for Understanding | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it
I recently found this video via a tweet from Jay McTighe. It features David Perkins, Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education: http://vimeo.com/37158826 A couple of notable quotes incl...

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An Interview with Grant Wiggins: The Power of Backwards Design

An Interview with Grant Wiggins: The Power of Backwards Design | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it
When Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe wrote Understanding by Design (UbD) they did what no other educator had ever accomplished.

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Where Essential Questions Come From

Where Essential Questions Come From | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it
Where do essential questions come from? Grant Wiggins explains.

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Educational Leadership:Feedback for Learning:Seven Keys to Effective Feedback

Educational Leadership:Feedback for Learning:Seven Keys to Effective Feedback | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it

"Advice, evaluation, grades—none of these provide the descriptive information that students need to reach their goals. What is true feedback—and how can it improve learning?"

According to Grant Wiggins, feedback "is information about how we are doing in our efforts to reach a goal." After providing this definition and a number of examples the reader will see that two types of feedback have been shown. He uses this information to show that the type of feedback provided is critical and then proceeds to give "feedback essentials" with a description and information on each essential. These include: goal-referenced, tangible and transparent, actionable, user-friendly, timely, ongoing, and consistent. Additional information is also provided as well as a look at Feedback vs. Advice and Feedback vs. Evaluation and Grades. With the new school year starting this article will give you much to think about when it comes to providing feedback for your students.


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Lisl Trowbridge's curator insight, October 15, 2014 1:23 PM

Wiggins provides 7 key elements of feedback.

Tony Palmeri's curator insight, October 4, 2015 7:27 PM

Feedback and advice are not synonymous! 

 

Great suggestions on providing effective feedback. Giving feedback that is actionable is important when providing instructional supervision and support. 

Erin Ryan's curator insight, October 19, 2015 8:15 PM

Feedback is information given to help us understand how we are doing when working to achieve a goal. Feedback should be goal-referenced meaning the information we provide gives the person information as to whether they are on track. It should be tangible and transparent, actionable, user-friendly, timely, ongoing and consistent. Specific examples of what was right and what needs work are very important to the receiver. As administrators, we need to be continuously providing our teachers feedback both formally and informally through meetings (face to face), discussions, emails.  

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Grant Wiggins: Defining Assessment

Grant Wiggins: Defining Assessment | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it

"Grant Wiggins is a nationally recognized assessment expert who has been working in assessment reform for more than twenty-five years. He is president of the educational consulting firm Authentic Education, and with Jay McTighe, co-author of Understanding by Design, an award-winning framework for curriculum design used around the world. In this interview, Wiggins shares his thoughts on performance assessments, standardized tests, and more.

 

Q & A:

What distinctions do you make between "testing" and "assessment?"
What is authentic assessment and why is it important?
Why is it important that teachers consider assessment before they begin planning lessons or projects?
How do you assess project-based learning?
How can technology support and enhance assessment?
How do you respond to the argument that teachers don't have enough time to design and conduct authentic or performance-based assessments?
Standardized tests, such as the SAT, are used by schools as a predictor of a student's future success. Is this a valid use of these tests?"


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Answers straight from the amazing source!

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Strategies for Effective Questioning

Strategies for Effective Questioning...

 

Building students critical thinking skills is a never-ending task for classroom teachers and using a variety of useful strategies for effective questioning is essential for prompting student inquiry. Bloom’s Taxonomy by Benjamin Bloom (1956) may be the most well known framework for questioning, but there are many other frameworks, including more recent research of ‘essential questions’ by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins (1999). In this Short Course, an exploration of several strategies for effective questioning with classroom application will be investigated.


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Assessment Rubric | iTeach

Assessment Rubric | iTeach | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it
Understanding by Design. "Backward design is goal directed. We aim for specific results and design backward from them accordingly." -Grant Wiggins & Jay McTighe, authors of Understanding by Design ...

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Common Core Big Idea 5: Consider Meaningful Assessment

Common Core Big Idea 5: Consider Meaningful Assessment | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it
Editor's note: This is the fifth post in a five-part series which takes a look at five big ideas for implementation of the Common Core State Standards, authored by Jay McTighe and Grant Wiggins.

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The Importance of Models: Intelligent vs. Thoughtless Use of Rubrics

The Importance of Models: Intelligent vs. Thoughtless Use of Rubrics | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it

"Those of us promoting the use of rubrics over the past 20 years can now smile and take satisfaction in the fact that the term is now familiar and the use of rubrics is commonplace world-wide. Alas, as with other good ideas, there has been some stupidification of this tool. I have seen unwise use of rubrics and countless poorly-written ones: invalid criteria, unclear descriptors, lack of parallelism across scores, etc. But the most basic error is the use of rubrics without models. Rubrics are too vague and nowhere near as helpful to students as they might be without models to validate and ground them." | by Grant Wiggins

  


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10 Conditions For Self-Sustaining Learning In The Classroom | TeachThought

10 Conditions For Self-Sustaining Learning In The Classroom | TeachThought | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it

by Grant Wiggins

 

"In all the hullabaloo about standards* and tests, a more basic aim has long been sacrificed in K-12 education: ensuring that students graduate able to handle the freedoms of college and the pro-active obligations of the workplace. As many have long heard me say, my children had more intellectual and executive freedom in Montessori School as 4 year olds than they did as high school students....

 

"What is wanted in education is a curriculum and assessment system that builds in, by design, a gradual release of teacher responsibility across the long-term scope and sequence. Traditional curriculum design runs completely counter to this idea, of course: the work gets harder and harder but the student has practically no executive control over the intellectual agenda up until graduation."


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13 Concrete Examples Of Better Feedback For Learning

13 Concrete Examples Of Better Feedback For Learning | Understanding by Design | Scoop.it

In September 2012 Grant Wiggins had an article published 'Educational Leadership' (which is posted in this Scoop.it). That article was widely read and this article goes one step further, provide 13 detailed examples of how to provide better feedback for learning. 

The examples range from a welding class with a performance task, to a 6th grade teacher working with students on peer review and self-assessment to 1st graders working on a map of the school. An additional 10 examples are provided.

This post not only provides examples but will probably spark you to look at how you provide feedback and come up with some new ideas to use with your students.


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