In the name of Agile
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Who Owns Governance?

Just because IT owns the technology platform, that doesn't mean they know best how to implement it..
The role of information technology (IT) is one of the most unappreciated, abused and misunderstood functions of the modern company.

In their recently released book The Heretics Guide to Best Practices, Paul Culmsee (@paulculmsee) and Kailash Awati (@kailashawati) define governance as having to answer four key questions:
WHAT is the desirable future state?
WHY is it desirable?
WHO will do what to get there (and who is accountable)?
HOW will we get there?
These are fundamentally business questions, not IT questions. Not to say that your IT team is incapable of understanding the business and doing the right things, but it is just simply not their focus to view all problems through holistic lens. Ask an IT person to solve a problem, get an IT answer. Nor should you expect your IT team to focus on business topics. Let them do what they do best, and get out of the way.
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In the name of Agile
All about Agile Software development, Project management & Lean methodologies
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MindMap: Manual Testing in an Agile Environment

MindMap: Manual Testing in an Agile Environment | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it

This MindMap is a bit of a gem, or monster as we refer to it.  It’s big and full of useful advice for any tester working in an agile and manual testing environment environment.

The MindMap image is below, followed by a checklist and a handy downloadable ZIP file containing various formats (PDF, Text, Word, PNG, jpg).

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How to: bring agile into the newsroom

How to: bring agile into the newsroom | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
What journalists can learn from software developers...

 

Wander into a room of developers and you may hear the term "agile". But what is agile and why and how should journalists learn from developers and adopt some of the principles?

This guide looks at how a number of newsrooms have taken aspects of agile on board, and how some journalists have actually been using some of the principles without knowing it.

 

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Seven Options for Handling Interruptions in Scrum and Other Agile Methods – Agile Advice – Working With Agile Methods

Seven Options for Handling Interruptions in Scrum and Other Agile Methods – Agile Advice – Working With Agile Methods | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it

Almost three years ago we wrote a brief article about interruptions. In that article, we described four methods of dealing with interruptions. I would like to expand on those four methods and add three more to present a comprehensive set of options for organizations struggling with this.


Via AM
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The Two Metrics that Matter | Agile

The Two Metrics that Matter | Agile | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it

The global recession has had a strong impact on the software development industry. These effects can be felt by anyone speaking to a development executive. The outcry is similar–“How can I do more with the same resources?” In order to address this need, there are two common objectives software development teams must embrace

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The Open Source Way

The Open Source Way | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
This guide is for helping people to understand how to and how not to engage with community over projects such as software, content, marketing, art, infrastructure, standards, and so forth.

 

-What this book is

A book that:

... describes a principle

... explains how to implement it

... and gives real world examples.

A thin reference guide to richer, thicker works that explain Big Principles in Lots of Fancy Words.

An open how-to manual, initially authored by the Red Hat Community Architecture team.

Useful for much more than just code -- art/design, documentation, marketing, translation, IT, and so on

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The invisible deficit & Dunning-Kruger effect

The invisible deficit & Dunning-Kruger effect | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it

I read with interest a tweet from Kent Beck the other day as it seemed to ring a bell: "the complexity created by a programmer is in inverse proportion to their ability to handle complexity". He followed up the tweet with a note on his Facebook page explaining that he'd been doing a code review of a developer's code and noticed that the guy didn't recognise that the solution he'd adopted was needlessly complex compared to the problem, but the developer simply couldn't see it. Kent finished with "The programmer least likely to be able to handle the extra complexity is exactly the one most likely to create it. Seems a little unfair.

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Exclusive: a behind-the-scenes look at Facebook release engineering

Exclusive: a behind-the-scenes look at Facebook release engineering | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
How does Facebook deploy improvements to one of the world's largest websites—and do so every day? Thank BitTorrent, IRC, karma, and a department called "release engineering." We go onsite with the team.
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The Role of the Product Owner

The Role of the Product Owner | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
How does the Product Owner fit in the Agile process?
....
Every company “does agile” a bit differently. Regardless of how much of the agile process Kool-Aid your company is drinking, it’s likely that you have put in place a role called Product Owner (PO)....
Obviously the role of PO is a complicated, intricate balancing act. It takes a very special personality to do it really well. You have to have a technically capable mind. You may not do development, but you had better be able to understand their language and what they do. You must have great soft skills. You are not a manager of people, but you are a leader without a doubt. The people who see you as a leader must feel comfortable telling you “no” when you ask for something improper. That means that they must trust you, and you must never abuse that trust.




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GE Able to Bring Jobs Home Thanks to Lean Methodology

GE Able to Bring Jobs Home Thanks to Lean Methodology | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
General Electric is able to bring jobs back to America after adopting lean manufacturing to improve efficiency.

“We have torn down functional silos and replaced them with a “one team” mentality.  Designers, engineers, and assembly-line workers together determine the best way to meet their goals; they own their own metrics.  They take pride in this ownership, and the results speak for themselves.”
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Scaling Agile Beyond the Team - Anatomy of Agile Enterprise

Scaling Agile Beyond the Team - Anatomy of Agile Enterprise | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
The agile movement has traditionally focused on agile software development at the team level. Team-based approaches, such as Scrum, focus on delivering day-to-day customer value, but do not, per se, ensure a strategic approach to business agility at the enterprise level. On the other, the notion of business agility dates back to times before agile software development, but its relationship to agile development and underpinnings in terms of IT organization have received relatively scarce attention
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Lean-Agile: Feedback early, often and center stage at Getty Images

Lean-Agile: Feedback early, often and center stage at Getty Images | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
Keeping things moving is important, but getting it right for the customer and market is the obvious other half of the Lean-Agile equation.


The principles of Lean and Agile are closely related and often intertwined.  Our use of both has evolved from our own understanding of what works in our environment and with our business and customers – our market. 

To maximize the flow of business value, you have to amplify feedback all along the way to ensure we will always be meeting the business needs – thus, ensuring that the end result is indeed, “business value”.  This is Lean-Agile.
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What Metrics Do You Use in Agile? | Test Obsessed

What Metrics Do You Use in Agile? | Test Obsessed | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
I know what metrics to use to manage a traditional phased project. But what metrics do you use on Agile projects?
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An Agile Primer

An Agile Primer | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
Agile development is growing in popularity for a reason: It results in faster time to market and, in most cases, better software.

 

In many ways, Agile practices are the "popular kids" of the software industry today. Most development shops have either tried them, are in the process of trying them or are planning to try them. Some shops are finding success; others are struggling to see what's different. Regardless, the popularity of Agile practices can no longer be ignored. They've arrived on the scene, and are becoming more and more mainstream

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Identifying Product Value, Then Designing the Right Product

Identifying Product Value, Then Designing the Right Product | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it

“Design has two important goals: delivering a good solution—getting the design right—and solving a significant and meaningful problem—
getting the right design.”—Steve Baty

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Towards the Perfect Build

Towards the Perfect Build | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it

An automated build and deployment system is no longer a dream. Now that PowerShell has matured as a product, and since the emergence of new tools such as Psake and Chocolatey, the ambition of the perfect build process has come nearer to reality

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Go Faster By Not Working

Go Faster By Not Working | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it

We all know by now that continuous integration is part of good software development – check in regularly and have a suite of automated tests run to confirm that everything is working as expected. If a test fails, jump on it quickly and get the build back to green. Simple right?

But what happens when something goes wrong in a way that can’t be fixed quickly?

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Better Teamwork Through Better Workplace Design

Collaboration is the way we work now. In a 2008 BusinessWeek study of white-collar professionals, 82% reported they needed to partner with others throughout the day to get their work done.

 

Unfortunately our legacy work environments — dominated by offices or cubes — rarely match this new reality

 

Organizations can address this problem by redesigning their workspaces around the following principles ..

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Small, Agile and fast: how to build a top 10 Facebook game | Feature | .net magazine

Small, Agile and fast: how to build a top 10 Facebook game | Feature | .net magazine | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it

"Philipp Moeser, CTO and co-founder of Wooga, talks about the key factors that have helped his agency develop successful social games"

 

There have been countless events over the last few years about a subject thats remains a point of contention within the games industry: what is the best way to make a Facebook game? I don’t pretend to have a ‘one-size-fits-all’ answer, because what works for us at Wooga may fail elsewhere. But for those working on a project that looks as if it may just tail off, I’d strongly advise you to consider a few core principles that have helped teams at Wooga guide projects to success.

 

 Over the years I've learnt that getting things accomplished is not about processes, and that being Agile always comes first. Our philosophy when dealing with all things from a/b testing to QAs is based on being Agile. Being open to new ideas, communicating efficiently and being able to react flexibly has helped Wooga create great social games that anyone can enjoy.

 

To appropriate Mark Zuckerberg once more: “Stay focused, and keep shipping”.

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The Art of Project Management: How to Make Things Happen

One myth of project management is that certain people have an innate ability to do it well, and others do not. Whenever this myth came up in conversation with other project managers, I always asked for an explanation of that ability—how to recognize it, categorize it, and, if possible, develop it in others. After discussion and debate, the only thing we usually identified—after considering many of the other topics and skills covered elsewhere in this book—is the ability to make things happen. Some people are able to apply their skills and talents in whatever combination necessary to move projects forward, and others cannot, even if they have the same or superior individual skills. The ability to make things happen is a combination of knowing how to be a catalyst or driver in a variety of different situations, and having the courage to do so.

 

This ability to drive is so important to some that it's used as a litmus test in hiring project managers.

 

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Kent Beck: Best Practices for Software Design with Low Feature Latency and High Throughput

Traditionally there have been two schools of thought about design: Predictive design, trying to design everything upfront (and making lot of wrong decisions) and reactive design, where any design is only done if it is absolutely necessary for implementing a feature (thus developing often on top of an insufficient design). Kent tried hard to discover such a design method that really delivers on the promises of both while avoiding their failures. This method is based on evolving design frequently in small, safe steps and focusing on learning while following some key best practices. It doesn’t really matter what scope of design we are are speaking about, the method and principles are the same whether you’re redesigning a class or a complex system.
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Who Owns Governance?

Just because IT owns the technology platform, that doesn't mean they know best how to implement it..
The role of information technology (IT) is one of the most unappreciated, abused and misunderstood functions of the modern company.

In their recently released book The Heretics Guide to Best Practices, Paul Culmsee (@paulculmsee) and Kailash Awati (@kailashawati) define governance as having to answer four key questions:
WHAT is the desirable future state?
WHY is it desirable?
WHO will do what to get there (and who is accountable)?
HOW will we get there?
These are fundamentally business questions, not IT questions. Not to say that your IT team is incapable of understanding the business and doing the right things, but it is just simply not their focus to view all problems through holistic lens. Ask an IT person to solve a problem, get an IT answer. Nor should you expect your IT team to focus on business topics. Let them do what they do best, and get out of the way.
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Doc On Dev: The Three "R"s of Clean Code

Doc On Dev: The Three "R"s of Clean Code | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
Keep it as simple as possible. Assume the people you work with are competent, capable, and want to do their jobs well. Developers tend to take personal pride in their work, as do most people. I've yet to meet anyone in the field who proudly (and seriously) proclaims, "I do my job poorly."

The team now has four signs that hang in their work space. The three Rs and The Boy Scout Rule Each of the R signs has a short list that further describes what the team means by the "rule".
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The Scrum Master and the Pursuit of Quality

The Scrum Master and the Pursuit of Quality | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
Your team has struggled for the past couple sprints with production deployments that have not gone smoothly. Defects are being reported and perhaps some complaints are creeping in around a poor customer experience. Throw in a couple rollbacks or hot-fixes and a trend is clearly starting to emerge. Developing software is not easy…throw in a complex architecture and a few legacy systems and it becomes even more challenging.

The art and craftsmanship of software design and development is typically outside of the realm of the Scrum Master role so what can they do to influence and focus the team back on quality and technical excellence. Here are five thoughts...."

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GDS design principles

GDS design principles | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
1Start with needs*
2Do less
3Design with data
4Do the hard work to make it simple
5Iterate. Then iterate again.
6Build for inclusion
7Understand context
8Build digital services, not websites
9Be consistent, not uniform
10Make things open: it makes things better
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Stop B*tching About Local Optimizations

Stop B*tching About Local Optimizations | In the name of Agile | Scoop.it
I'm kinda tired of hearing folks whine about everything under the sun being a local optimization. I don't care how much you quote Ackoff, Argyris, Senge or anyone else coz here's the deal:

Unless you can take a single action and reinvent the whole effing universe instantly then EVERYTHING you do is a local optimization!
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