Archaeological Journalism
5.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Archaeological Journalism
Journalism and Archaeological Communication
Curated by Caterina Pisu
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Museums Newspaper: Is photo sharing real communication?

Caterina Pisu's insight:
An analysis of the Invasioni Digitali (Digital Invasions) phenomenon ahead of the conference “Digital Think-In. The digital voice of museums”
On  the coming November the 4th, the conference  “DigitalThink-In. The digitalvoice of museums” will take place in Rome, organized by MAXXI, which announces itself as the “first digital culture event for museums in Italy”. Among the participants at the conference, for whom also a #DITcall for presentation of case studies related to the topic at hand is open, there will be James Davis, Program Manager of Google Art Project (London), Antonella Di Lazzaro, Director Media Twitter Italy (Milan), Conxa Rodà, Head of Strategy and Communication - Museu Nacional d'Art de Catalunya (Barcelona), Group MUD Museo Digitale, MiBACT (Rome) and Prisca Cupellini, Comunicazione Online e Progetti Digitali, MAXXI (Rome), Francesco Russo , Web Consultant and blogger, Marianna Marcucci, Cofounder of Invasioni Digitali and Alessandro Bollo, Cofounder and Head of Research of the Fondazione Fitzcarraldo. The InvasioniDigitali (Digital Invasions) movement, therefore, is once again present at a conference discussing about digital communication, but the Invasions phenomenon has not yet been thoroughly analyzed by the experts. Are we really facing a digital communication model? I will try to argue my personal opinion in  this regard.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Caterina Pisu from Archaeology News
Scoop.it!

Indiana Jones' Whip Sold For £20,000

Indiana Jones' Whip Sold For £20,000 | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it

The bull-whip used by Indiana Jones went under the hammer in London as one of the 160 lots in a sale of music and movie memorabilia which netted a total of £652,950.

 

The whip, famously wielded by Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones in the first three movies of the adventure franchise, fetched £20,000 at the Christie's sale, well above its estimated maximum of £15,000.

 

The auction catalogue described it as "a hand-made twelve-plait 450 series 6 ft. bull-whip of kangaroo hide, created by whipmaker David Morgan and used by Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones


Via David Connolly
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Blogging Pompeii: Conference: Subterranean Archaeology in Italy

A blog for all those who work on Pompeii and the other archaeological sites of the Bay of Naples. ... Working underground can also present particular challenges with regard to safety, communication and equipment use.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Romance in the Ruins: Archaeology and Adventure Romances

Romance in the Ruins: Archaeology and Adventure Romances | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
Whether you read them for the sense of place, the history, or the adventure, archaeology and adventure romances provide wonderful escapes and a touch of the exotic. It's no wonder they're so popular with readers around the ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Another Reason Why Biblical Studies and Archaeology Should Not ...

Ah, the paleobabbling media now gives us proof that it is also clueless with respect to intellectual discourse. Mark Goodacre reports that Nicole Austin, the Associate Producer on The Resurrection Tomb Mystery documentary ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Prehistoric Human Hunters the Cause of Giant Herbivore Extinction in Australia, Says Study | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past

Prehistoric Human Hunters the Cause of Giant Herbivore Extinction in Australia, Says Study | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
Popular Archaeology Online archaeology magazine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Troops Leave, Archaeologists Return, as Hope for Iraq’s Cultural Relics and Tourism Industry Grow | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past

Troops Leave, Archaeologists Return, as Hope for Iraq’s Cultural Relics and Tourism Industry Grow | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
Popular Archaeology Online archaeology magazine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Language and Archaeology | Rise of Civilization

Something that I've been thinking about while looking into archaeology is the aspect of language. Not language of ancient societies or any sort of idea of communication but more related to academia and the requirements of ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Archaeologists Return to Excavate Major 3300-Year-Old Bronze ...

Archaeologists Return to Excavate Major 3300-Year-Old Bronze ... | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
Archaeologists Return to Excavate Major 3300-Year-Old Bronze Age Site in England. Popular Archaeology Sat, 17 Mar 2012 16:04 CDT. Print. Some of the world's greatest archaeological finds don't emerge as a result of planned investigation ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Archaeologists Protest 'Glamorization' of Looting on TV

Archaeologists Protest 'Glamorization' of Looting on TV | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it

 

E' il caso di esclamare "incredibile ma vero"! Negli Stati Uniti succede anche questo: il mondo dei reality ha invaso il campo dell'archeologia, addirittura rendendo protagonisti di due programmi televisivi dei veri e propri "tombaroli", filmati mentre compiono le loro eroiche gesta, alla ricerca di tesori che li renderanno ricchi e famosi. Se non c'è da stupirsi che ciò possa essere l'invenzione malsana di una qualsiasi televisione privata, si resta interdetti nel sapere che uno dei canali che metterà in onda questa sorta di reality sarà il National Geographic! Gli archeologi americani sono in rivolta e non possono che contare sulla solidarietà dei colleghi di tutto il mondo oltre che di ogni persona di buon senso. A questo punto bisogna riabilitare il vecchio archeologo Indiana Jones che almeno pretendeva che i reperti archeologici fossero custoditi nei musei! Mala tempora currunt...

(Caterina Pisu)

 

Archaeologists are mounting a campaign against two new cable TV shows that they say encourage and glamorize looting of American archaeological sites.

On 20 March, Spike TV will premiere a new show called American Digger, while a show called Diggers on the National Geographic Channel made its debut 28 February. Both shows "promote and glorify the looting and destruction of archaeological sites," Society for American Archaeology (SAA) President William F. Limp wrote in a message posted earlier this week to the SAA listserv.

The premise of American Digger, which is being hosted by a former professional wrestler, was laid out in a recent announcement by Spike TV. A team of "diggers" will "scour target-rich areas, such as battlefields and historic sites, in hopes of striking it rich by unearthing and selling rare pieces of American history." Similar locales are featured in National Geographic's Diggers. In the second episode, set in South Carolina, Revolutionary War and War of 1812 buttons, bullets, and coins were recovered at a former plantation.

After viewing the first two episodes of Diggers, Iowa's State archaeologist John Doershuk posted a review to the American Cultural Resources Association listserv, in which he lamented: "The most damaging thing, I think, about this show is that no effort was made to document where anything came from or discussion of associations—each discovered item was handled piece-meal."

"It was ironic that they [the show's on-air diggers] are destroying the entire basis of what they're interested in," Doershuk told Science Insider by phone. "These are non-renewable sources. There's only so many of them from these time periods."
The archaeological community is trying to make its views known. In addition to Facebook petitions, professional societies such as SAA have sent letters of condemnation to Spike TV and National Geographic. (Copies of the SAA letters are on its Web site.) Limp said Tuesday on the SAA listserv that Spike TV had not yet responded to its concerns. He wrote that National Geographic indicated that it would place a disclaimer into its show that affirms there are laws in place protecting archaeological and historic sites.
Despite the treasure-hunting theme of both shows, neither appears to be violating federal and state regulations against unlawful obtainment of antiquities. The on-air fortune seekers are not venturing into National Parks or other federal lands, but dig on private property. If property owners sign off, then it is legal--landowners can do whatever they choose with artifacts found on their land. That's the argument Shana Tepper, spokesperson for Spike TV, made to ScienceInsider. "Our show is shot on private property," she said. "They're getting artifacts that are otherwise rotting in the ground."
But archaeologists remain concerned. "These programs encourage looting," University of Colorado, Boulder, archaeologist Steve Lekson wrote in an e-mail to ScienceInsider. National Geographic's imprimatur also rankles some. "Its reputation as a credible scientific and educational institution" effectively "normalizes" the looting aspect of its show, says Washington State University archaeologist William Lipe.
Lekson bemoans the yawning gap between the scientific approach to archaeology and the popular notion that the discipline is basically organized treasure hunting. In the United States, that perception dates back to the late 1800s and early 1900s, when museums sponsored field expeditions to dig up Native American ruins. That ethos quickly gave way to the modern science of archaeology, which developed a set of ethics and practices that shunned its exploitative roots. But popular culture clings to the treasure hunting mythos.
"Two hundred years ago, archaeology was a treasure hunt—finding fabulous things for museum collections," says Lekson. "But we learned long ago that archaeological sites were really books to be read, pages of history. We can learn a great deal about pasts we would otherwise never know, by studying sites themselves and artifacts (simple or spectacular) in their original contexts at sites. When treasure hunters loot sites, ripping artifacts out of the ground, we lose any chance of understanding context—what was with what, its date, how it was used, what it can tell us about history—all so somebody can have a trinket on their mantelpiece."

 

Extrac from ScienceInsider

 

Versione italiana

 

GLI ARCHEOLOGI PROTESTANO CONTRO L'ESALTAZIONE DEL "SACCHEGGIO" DI REPERTI ARCHEOLOGICI IN TELEVISIONE

 

Gli archeologi USA stanno organizzando una campagna contro due nuovi spettacoli televisivi via cavo che incoraggerebbero e spettacolarizzerebbero il saccheggio di siti archeologici americani.

Il 20 marzo prossimo la Spike TV presenterà in anteprima un nuovo spettacolo chiamato American Diggers, mentre uno spettacolo chiamato Diggers sul National Geographic Channel ha fatto il suo debutto già lo scorso 28 febbraio. Entrambi gli spettacoli "promuoverebbero ed esalterebbero il saccheggio e la distruzione di siti archeologici," come il Presidente della Society for American Archaeology (SAA), William F. Limp, ha scritto in un messaggio postato all'inizio di questa settimana sulla Mailing-list della SAA.

La presentazione dell'American Digger , che viene condotta da un ex wrestler professionista, è avvenuta in un recente annuncio sulla Spike TV. Un gruppo di "cercatori" dovrà perlustrare i siti ritenuti più idonei, per esempio noti campi di battaglia o altri siti storici, nella speranza di diventare ricchi dissotterrando e vendendo pezzi rari della storia americana." Qualcosa di simile è presente anche in Diggers del National Geographic. Nel secondo episodio, ambientato in South Carolina, in una piantagione sono stati recuperati vari oggetti risalenti alla Guerra d'Indipendenza del 1812, tra cui bottoni, proiettili e monete.

Dopo aver visto i primi due episodi di Diggers, l'archeologo John Doershuk dello Stato dell'Iowa, ha pubblicato una recensione sulla Mailing-list dell'American Cultural Resources Association, in cui lamentava che "la cosa più dannosa, credo, di questo spettacolo è che non è stato fatto nessuno sforzo per documentare da quale contesto tutto ciò è venuto alla luce e quali associazioni di oggetti sono state rinvenute nel corso dello scavo, mente ogni elemento scoperto è stato maneggiato e considerato singolarmente senza tenere conto di ciò".

"E' ironico osservare che questi "scavatori" dello show televisivo stanno distruggendo le basi della loro stessa ricerca" ha detto Doershuk, di ScienceInsider, per telefono. "Si tratta di fonti non rinnovabili. Nonostante quelle che ci giungono da queste fasi storiche siano numerose".

La comunità archeologica sta cercando di far conoscere il suo punto di vista. Oltre alle petizioni su Facebook, alcune società professionali, come SAA, hanno inviato lettere di condanna a Spike TV e National Geographic. (Copie delle lettere SAA sono sul loro sito web ufficiale). Martedì scorso Limp ha detto sulla Mailing-list del SAA che Spike TV non aveva ancora risposto alla lettera in cui erano state espresse le preoccupazioni sopra descritte. Il National Geographic ha riferito che renderà visibile una dichiarazione di non responsabilità durante la trasmissione per informare il pubblico che sono in vigore delle leggi che proteggono i siti storici e archeologici.

Nonostante la caccia al tesoro sia il tema di entrambe le trasmissioni televisive, non sembra che siano state violate le norme federali e statali contro il recupero illecito di antichità. Gli scavatori televisivi non si avventurano in parchi nazionali o in altre terre federali, ma scavano su proprietà private. Se i proprietari degli immobili danno il loro consenso, allora lo scavo è legale - i proprietari terrieri possono fare ciò che desiderano con i reperti trovati sulla loro terra. Questa è la giustificazione addotta da Shana Tepper, portavoce di Spike TV, inoltrata a ScienceInsider. "La nostra trasmissione è stata girata in una proprietà privata", ha detto. "Si tratta di artefatti che altrimenti marcirebbero nella terra".

Ma gli archeologi sono preoccupati. "Questi programmi incoraggiano il saccheggio," come l'archeologo Steve Lekson, della University of Colorado, Boulder, ha scritto in una e-mail a ScienceInsider. L'imprimatur del National Geographic brucia anche un po'. "La sua reputazione di istituzione scientifica e didattica credibile", ufficializza in qualche modo e "normalizza" il carattere di saccheggio del suo show, dice l'archeologo William Lipe della Washington State University.

Lekson lamenta il divario tra l'approccio scientifico dell'archeologia ufficiale e lo svilimento popolare che riduce la disciplina a una caccia al tesoro. Negli Stati Uniti, questa percezione risale alla fine del 1800 e aiprimi anni del 1900, quando i musei iniziarono a finanziare spedizioni sul campo per recuperare reperti tra le rovine dei nativi americani. Questa abitudine rapidamente cedette il passo alla moderna scienza dell'archeologia, che ha sviluppato una serie di principi etici e di comportamenti tesi ad evitare lo sfruttamento della ricerca archeologica. Ma la cultura popolare si aggrappa ancora al mito della caccia al tesoro.

"Duecento anni fa l'archeologia era una caccia al tesoro tesa al recupero di oggetti favolosi per le collezioni dei musei", dice Lekson. "Ma abbiamo imparato da tempo che i siti archeologici sono veramente libri da leggere, pagine di storia. Possiamo imparare molto sul passato che altrimenti non potremmo sapere, semplicemente studiando i siti stessi e i reperti (dai più semplici ai più preziosi) nei loro contesti originali. Quando i cacciatori di tesori rapinano i siti archeologici, strappando letteralmente i manufatti fuori dalla terra, perdiamo ogni possibilità di comprensione del contesto, la possibilità di datarlo, elementi che ne facciano capire l'utilizzo e ogni altro dato che ci può raccontare la storia, tutto questo in cambio della soddisfazione di alcuni di esporre un oggetto antico su una mensola della propria casa".

 

Tratto da ScienceInsider

 

http://archaeologicaljournalism.blogspot.com/2012/03/archaeologists-protest-glamorization-of.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Feminine Voices in Archaeology: Everybody has a story...

Despite the growth and success of feminist archaeology, women in archaeology still face issues not necessarily encountered by their male counterparts in the 21st Century. Legacies of past discrimination, particularly the ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Publishing Archaeology: Science and the Human Sciences ...

Publishing Archaeology: Science and the Human Sciences ... | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
This blog contains information and opinions (mostly mine) on professional publishing issues in archaeology. I am especially concerned with quality control, Open Access, and communication with other disciplines.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Journalism and archaeological communication: Gli Uffizi visti dagli archeoblogger

Journalism and archaeological communication: Gli Uffizi visti dagli archeoblogger | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Harvests from September conferences | From Artefact to Meaning

Harvests from September conferences | From Artefact to Meaning | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
As I understand it, cognitive archaeology tries to unpack what was happening in the minds of people past; in contrast, what I'm doing is trying to unpack what happens in present people's minds when they attempt to understand the past.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Journalism and archaeological communication: Storia di uno stage

Journalism and archaeological communication: Storia di uno stage | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

What's on today - Times of Malta

What's on todayTimes of MaltaAt the Grand Salon of the National Museum of Archaeology, Metal Magic: Spanish Treasures from the Khalili Collections. Until July 29.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

'Lords of Time' reign at Penn museum exhibit on Mayan calendar and culture - Newsworks.org

'Lords of Time' reign at Penn museum exhibit on Mayan calendar and culture - Newsworks.org | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
'Lords of Time' reign at Penn museum exhibit on Mayan calendar and cultureNewsworks.orgUpon entering "Maya 2012: Lords of Time" at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, visitors are confronted with a wall jammed with...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Genetic Studies of Modern Populations Show Varying Neandertal Ancestry | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past

Genetic Studies of Modern Populations Show Varying Neandertal Ancestry | Popular Archaeology - exploring the past | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
Popular Archaeology Online archaeology magazine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Seminar on Virtual Archaeology: Communication in a digital view | TheArchaeologicalBox.com - Archaeology Central

Seminar on Virtual Archaeology: Communication in a digital view | TheArchaeologicalBox.com - Archaeology Central | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
RT @ArchaeoBox: COMMUNITY| Seminar on Virtual Archaeology: Communication in a digital view: The third ed. of "Semin...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Apocalypse Now? Modern Maya and Ancient Prophecies - Vanderbilt University News

Apocalypse Now? Modern Maya and Ancient Prophecies - Vanderbilt University News | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
Apocalypse Now? Modern Maya and Ancient PropheciesVanderbilt University NewsMaya people and culture have been featured prominently in popular culture over the last few years, and especially now, as the media have played up ancient Maya prophecies...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations – Bible ...

Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations – Bible ... | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
But these tasks were common among archaeologists who excavated in the Near East before World War I as they were among the few familiar with Arabic, local geography, customs and people. Unusual about Bell was that ...
more...
David Connolly's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:12 AM

She is such a heroine! 

 

Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Rare wood statue of woman pharaoh found in University of Toronto dig in Egypt - parentcentral.ca

Rare wood statue of woman pharaoh found in University of Toronto dig in Egypt - parentcentral.ca | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
Rare wood statue of woman pharaoh found in University of Toronto dig in Egyptparentcentral.caLast summer, in a dig in Egypt, a University of Toronto archaeologist discovered a wooden statue with an hourglass figure and gentle chin that was likely...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

Archaeologists Protest 'Glamorization' of Looting on TV - Science Now

Archaeologists Protest 'Glamorization' of Looting on TV - Science Now | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
Archaeologists Protest 'Glamorization' of Looting on TVScience NowLekson bemoans the yawning gap between the scientific approach to archaeology and the popular notion that the discipline is basically organized treasure hunting.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Caterina Pisu
Scoop.it!

The role of the private sector in African archeology « Cultural ...

The role of the private sector in African archeology « Cultural ... | Archaeological Journalism | Scoop.it
On the second day of the Berlin International Economics Congress, we received an insight into the link between the private sector and the fascinating world of archaeological exploration. ...
more...
No comment yet.