Communicate...and how!
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Communicate...and how!
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The Emotionally Intelligent Person's Guide To Disagreeing With Your Boss

The Emotionally Intelligent Person's Guide To Disagreeing With Your Boss | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

There are few occasions where having high emotional intelligence (EQ) comes in handy more than when you disagree with your boss. But it's hardly the only one. Many of us would even happily trade off a few IQ points in exchange for some extra EQ. In fact, people with very high IQs but lower emotional intelligence may be more likely to upset their bosses by focusing too much on the logical side of an argument while ignoring the social and emotional dimensions.

 

In fact, the most effective approach to disagreeing with your manager should really be based on EQ rather than IQ. Unsurprisingly, research suggests that employees with higher emotional intelligence are generally more rewarding to deal with, which is why they're more often promoted than those who aren't. In a world that still bases so many crucial career decisions on a single subjective factor in the eyes of one's direct manager, likability often trumps ability and work ethic.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 4, 2016 4:43 PM

Hint: Know when to cut your losses and back down.

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Here's How To Make Big Career Decisions You Won't Regret

Here's How To Make Big Career Decisions You Won't Regret | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

What makes big decisions so hard? As a decision coach, I see many people struggle with tough choices, because they really, really want to have no regrets.

 

While I’ve never met anyone who felt they got it right 100% of the time, going back to the basics can help you get clear on what you want and feel better about moving forward.

 

Here are five simple strategies I’ve learned for lessening the odds that you’ll look back and wish you did it differently.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 1, 2016 4:42 PM

Making big decisions can be challenging because you're worried you'll make the wrong choice. Here's how to minimize your likelihood of regret.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, December 4, 2016 6:52 AM

Post very interesting, revealing some aspects that I did not know about careers. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish, more about people management can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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How to Give an Emotionally Intelligent Presentation

How to Give an Emotionally Intelligent Presentation | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

Emotions play an active role in almost all of our decision making. That's one reason why emotional intelligence, the ability to identify, understand, and manage those emotions, is such an invaluable skill. 

 

But how specifically does emotional intelligence help us with our daily tasks? Here are three tips to make sure your next presentation is emotionally intelligent:

 

1. Don't get anxious. Get excited.

All of us get nervous before a presentation, even if we've done it hundreds of times. So take that nervousness and turn it into something positive: enthusiasm.How do you do that exactly?

Spend those final few moments reviewing your favorite parts of the presentation. Remind yourself why you're doing this, and focus on the value you have to deliver to your listeners.

Now, take that enthusiasm and give a talk that you passionately believe in.

 


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Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, October 2, 2016 3:27 PM

 

"But how specifically does emotional intelligence help us with our daily tasks? Here are three tips to make sure your next presentation is emotionally intelligent: . . . "

Helen Teague's curator insight, October 4, 2016 5:18 PM
The Learning Factor's insight: View your presentation from your audience's perspective instead of your own.
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3 Subtle Ways To Make An Impact While You're New To The Job

3 Subtle Ways To Make An Impact While You're New To The Job | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it
You’d probably be lying to yourself if you said you’ve never gone into a new job and resolved to outperform your team’s expectations. You have plenty of good ideas and want everyone to know that you’re a genius of sorts.

Most of the time, that mind-set’s great for your career—it pushes you to be your best day in and day out. But the problem is that some people think that motivating themselves this way gives them permission to push their teammates around.

 

While your company hired you because you bring something unique to the table, that doesn’t give you license to be condescending about it. So if you want to convince your coworkers that you perform above your pay grade, here are a few mind-sets you should adopt ASAP.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 4, 2016 6:41 PM

Being the new hire with tons of "great ideas" won't always endear you to your team. Here's a better way to have an influence early on.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, September 5, 2016 10:00 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
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The Eight Principles of Connectivism (Visual)

The Eight Principles of Connectivism (Visual) | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it
This infographic outlines the learning theory pioneered by George Siemens and Stephen Downes.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 16, 2014 7:39 PM

Have you wondered what connectivism is? This infographic, using information from Stephen Downes and George Siemens provides this definition for connectivism:

"...the thesis that knowledge is distributed across a network of connections, and therefore that learning consists of the ability to connect and traverse those networks."

What are the 8 principles? They are listed below but you will find much more information in the infographic.

1. Learning and knowledge rest in a diversity of opinions

2. Learning is the process of connecting specialized nodes

3. Learning may reside in non-human appliances

4. Capacity to know is more important than what is currently known

5. Nurturing and maintaining connections is needed to facilitate continual learning

6. The ability to define connections between concepts is important

7. Currency (accurate, up-to-date knowledge) is the intent of all connectivist learning activities

8. Decision-making is a learning process as information can change and what is viewed as correct one day may be incorrect the next

The second part of this infographic focuses on What Does an Online Connectist Course Look Like?

There is much information to be found in this lengthy infographic. It also includes a list of works consulted.

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A Tool for Self-Assessment & Reflection

A Tool for Self-Assessment  & Reflection | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

"I have been working on a tool for students to do a self assessment/reflection and feedback...The tool is based around the work of Stephen Dinham which is used be DET NSW and New Zealand eductors John Hattie & Helen Timperley."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 4, 2014 9:21 PM

Andrew Church has created a tool for Self-Assessment and Reflection that asks students to answer 4 questions:

* What can I do? ((How am I going?)

* What can't I do? (How am I going?)

* How does my work compare with others? (How am I going?) 

* What can I do better? (Where do I go next?)

And then students are asked to look ahead with this question:

* What are my next steps? (What actions are you going to take as  a result of your reflections? Who can help me? Where to next?)

You can download two versions of this as a pdf file. One is in portrait mode and one in landscape mode. Church also asks that you provide him with feedback.

Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, April 5, 2014 1:29 AM

"I have been working on a tool for self assessment/reflection and feedback...This particular tool is based around the work of Stephen Dinham  and John Hattie & Helen Timperley."

Carol Thomson's curator insight, April 6, 2014 3:35 PM

Have been looking for something i can use with students that they understand and dont panic about.

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Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

"Critical thought is a cognitive process that proposes the systematic analysis of information, opinion and statements that we accept in our daily life as valid or true. It is a basic skill for a competent, free and responsible citizen."


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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, March 18, 2014 8:35 AM

Critical Thinking: Educating Competent Citizens

Susan Walker-Meere's curator insight, November 9, 2014 12:49 PM

I would add: Trans-disciplinary thinking; systems thinking for sustainability. Most people can not see the forest through the trees so miss the larger connections of the impacts that action, goods & services have on both environmental systems and human systems. 

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, November 16, 2014 3:48 PM

La pensée critique, une competence clé du 21ème siècle avec tant d'information qui nous arrive. 

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Cultures of Thinking: Six Principles

Cultures of Thinking:  Six Principles | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

1. Skills are not sufficient; we must also have the disposition to use them.
Possessing thinking skills and abilities alone is insufficient for good thinking. One
must also have the disposition to use those abilities. This means schools must
develop students’ inclination to think and awareness of occasions for thinking as
well as their thinking skills and abilities. Having a disposition toward thinking
enhances the likelihood that one can effectively use one’s abilities in new
situations.
2. The development of thinking and understanding is fundamentally a social
endeavor, taking place in a cultural context and occurring within the constant
interplay between the group and the individual. Social situations that provide
experience in communicating oneʼs own thinking as well as opportunities to
understand othersʼ thinking enhance individual thinking.
3. The culture of the classroom teaches. It not only sets a tone for learning, but
also determines what gets learned. The messages sent through the culture of the
classroom communicate to students what it means to think and learn well. These
messages are a curriculum in themselves, teaching students how to learn and
ways of thinking.
4. As educators, we must strive to make students thinking visible. It is only by
making thinking visible that we can begin to understand both what and how our
students are learning. Under normal conditions, a studentʼs thinking is invisible to
other students, the teacher, and even to him/herself, because people often think
with little awareness of how they think. By using structures, routines, probing
questions, and documentation we can make studentsʼ thinking more visible toward
fostering better thinking and learning.
5. Good thinking utilizes a variety of resources and is facilitated by the use of
external tools to “download” or “distribute” oneʼs thinking. Papers, logs,
computers, conversation, and various means of recording and keeping track of
ideas and thoughts free the mind up to engage in new and deeper thinking.
6. For classrooms to be cultures of thinking for students, schools must be
cultures of thinking for teachers. The development of a professional community
in which deep and rich discussions of teaching, learning, and thinking are a
fundamental part of teachersʼ ongoing experience provides the foundation for
nurturing studentsʼ thinking and learning.


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The Only Three Networking Emails You Need To Know How To Write

The Only Three Networking Emails You Need To Know How To Write | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

It’s helpful to be honest about why you’re reaching out (for example, you’re going through a job search or moving to a new city). It can combat nerves and help the process feel more genuine. In other words, it instantly solves two core issues many people stress about when told to network.

 

That said, as with anything else, you know there’s a difference between being straightforward and being overly blunt. For example, you know to write, "I was thinking of approaching the project from a different angle" over "I hate all of your ideas."

 

Aspiring to find this balance, many people begin networking emails with "Remember me?" or even, "You probably don’t remember me..." After all, why not begin with an honest admission so the other person knows you aren’t being fake? Well, unfortunately, this approach often backfires. While you’re coming from a sincere place, it’s pretty audacious to ask for something from someone whom you’re blatantly admitting you barely know.

 


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Adele Taylor's curator insight, December 5, 2016 3:53 PM

I think this title should be about reaching out to contacts.

As the article implies networking can be scary, and might scare away readers but a good article overall.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, December 5, 2016 9:43 PM
It certainly helps to be upfront, honest and straightforward in writing Networking Emails. We have come a long way from times when it was perhaps expected that letters should run into pages, filled with flowery expression and long sentences. I found the examples in the article really helpful, and am sharing the same for others to read!
Emma Urbanek's curator insight, December 6, 2016 1:46 PM
Writing about yourself can seem nearly impossible, not anymore! 
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Here's How To Make Big Career Decisions You Won't Regret

Here's How To Make Big Career Decisions You Won't Regret | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

What makes big decisions so hard? As a decision coach, I see many people struggle with tough choices, because they really, really want to have no regrets.

 

While I’ve never met anyone who felt they got it right 100% of the time, going back to the basics can help you get clear on what you want and feel better about moving forward.

 

Here are five simple strategies I’ve learned for lessening the odds that you’ll look back and wish you did it differently.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 1, 2016 4:42 PM

Making big decisions can be challenging because you're worried you'll make the wrong choice. Here's how to minimize your likelihood of regret.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, December 4, 2016 6:52 AM

Post very interesting, revealing some aspects that I did not know about careers. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish, more about people management can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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The 1 Simple Mind Trick That Instantly Makes You More Persuasive

The 1 Simple Mind Trick That Instantly Makes You More Persuasive | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

Even as neuroscientists continue to unearth new discoveries about the human brain, some of the most effective brain hacks have been around for years. Take Blaise Pascal, for example, born in 1623. The 17th-century French philosopher, mathematician, and physicist explored human nature in his book of essays Pensées.

 

Brain Pickings sheds light on his stance on the art of persuasion: "Pascal came to see that the surest way of defeating the erroneous views of others is not by bombarding the bastion of their self-righteousness but by slipping in through the backdoor of their beliefs."

 

If you want to get someone to change their mind, you might be tempted to immediately start the discussion with talking points about why they're wrong. Pascal recommended a different approach. Start in their camp instead. Cozy up to what this person already believes, and admit there's truth in what they believe. Then, present the larger picture -- in which other angles and approaches exist. This approach is meant to lead someone into discovering another perspective or angle on their own. Instead of you doing the persuading, you're setting them up to persuade themselves.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 13, 2016 6:35 PM

Mastering the art of persuasion is as simple as beginning with "You're right."

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Good Communication Requires Experimenting with Your Language

Good Communication Requires Experimenting with Your Language | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

Consider a delinquent taxpayer who receives one of the following two letters in the mail:

Letter 1: We are writing to inform you that we have still not received your tax payment of $5,000. It is imperative that you contact us.

Letter 2: We are writing to inform you that we have still not received your tax payment of $5,000. By now, 9 out of 10 people in your town have paid their taxes. It is imperative that you contact us.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, February 4, 2016 5:13 PM

Changing how you phrase things can pay off.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, February 5, 2016 1:36 AM

Experimenting with language, and simply not sticking to phrases and expressions, just because they have been used for ages, apparently just don't make them effective! Sometimes, official communication is so formal and brief, that the meaning is lost! This is indeed one article that highlights the need to review accepted norms of language for efficacy! The high sounding, "you are hereby warned that" , or "through the columns of your esteemed newspaper" seem too cliched to be effective, and at times the first one meant to intimadate the receipient might in fact add to the confusion!

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A Block Graphic Calculator

A Block Graphic Calculator | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

"Calculators have come a long way since the first ones that could add, subtract, multiply, and divide.  Now, for a modest cost, it’s possible to purchase a graphing calculator.  Or, with your computer, you can put a free one in your browser."


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, July 29, 2014 9:13 PM

Have you considered a different option? What about a block graphic calculator? This now a common way to teach coding, having students connect blocks together to build code. Blockly has a free online block calculator that provides math (a portion of the options are shown in the image), variables and logic. To the left side of the coding is the graphing calculator.

This type of calculator may help visual learners who may more easily create formulas through the use of blocks. Check it out at Blockly.

Yasemin Allsop's curator insight, July 30, 2014 12:24 PM

This is brilliant !

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7 Ways Teaching Has Changed

7 Ways Teaching Has Changed | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

"Teachers are the arbitrators of knowledge and culture.

Knowledge and culture are each dynamic, endlessly crashing and churning.

This makes teaching significantly important and difficult work, and can leave teaching—as a craft—wide-eyed and nonplussed in response.

Worse, those outside the bubble of education can understandably struggle to understand the problem.

What are the teaching in those schools anyway? How is it any different from when I was in school?"


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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 28, 2014 10:13 PM

How has teaching changed? Below are the seven key ideas. .

1. A culture of emerging literacies

2. A society that is mobile

3. A world where equity is a central theme

4. A society of constant connectivity

5. A world where the technology learns, too

6. A context that demands new credibility in an era of information

7. A culture that can seem, well, distracted

Many teachers may be overwhelmed with these changes and may require professional development to help them develop new skills that technology brings. But change has happened before and will continue to happen. The question is how are we adapting to the changes and how can we assist our students in becoming independent  learners in this new age of learning?

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, March 29, 2014 9:09 AM

7 Ways Teaching Has Changed

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What Is Web 3.0 And How Will It Change Education?

What Is Web 3.0 And How Will It Change Education? | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it
We'll reach a new state of web skills when we reinvent technology tools to better enhance our personal learning. We'll be at 3.0 when schools are everywhere and not viewed as daycare.

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, January 12, 2014 1:56 PM

Web 3.0 has been shared on this Scoop.it and this table is a bit different from previous ones. What do you think? Is your school heading towards a Web 3.0 environment, where teachers will not only be those whom are licensed professionals but also those who are accesible on line from all parts of the worlld? Will schools graduate students whom view industrywill view as co-workers whom are prepared for a knowledge economy? This table presents what may be in the future. What do you think?

Lori Wilk's curator insight, January 12, 2014 2:55 PM

Great to have a chart for comparison

Julie Ekner Koch's curator insight, January 14, 2014 3:00 PM

Our learning experience is changing, both in the education system and in the workplace. This table provides an overview of the new web 3.0 and its implications

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Personalizing Learning

Personalizing Learning | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it
Richard Culatta is with the US Department of Education at the Office of Educational Technology. He is an exceptional speaker and a “smart cookie”, I dig his self-deprecating style. He k...

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