Communicate...and how!
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Communicate...and how!
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The New Elevator Pitch: Share Your 'Why,' Not Your 'What'

The New Elevator Pitch: Share Your 'Why,' Not Your 'What' | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

I can remember just a year ago when, by chance, I found myself having a conversation with a woman affiliated with the United Nations. I began to open up to her about my vision for reimagining higher education.

I recognized there wasn’t anything logical about why she should be interested in my idea. I didn’t have much to show for it like a fancy website, sponsors or a big social media presence, but I did have one thing that set me apart—passion. I was able to convey my “why” behind my project, the burning need I felt for the education system to expand its horizons to prepare students for nontraditional career paths. She was immediately enrolled, and on the spot she invited me to present my idea to the UN in 3 weeks.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, April 27, 7:56 PM

The classic 60-second elevator pitch in which you share "what" you do is outdated and ineffective. Learn how to craft a pitch that will instantly enroll others by sharing your "why" instead.

Jerry Busone's curator insight, April 29, 10:55 AM

Delivering the why is most important  today in sales  and leading sales people ... 

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The Only Three Networking Emails You Need To Know How To Write

The Only Three Networking Emails You Need To Know How To Write | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

It’s helpful to be honest about why you’re reaching out (for example, you’re going through a job search or moving to a new city). It can combat nerves and help the process feel more genuine. In other words, it instantly solves two core issues many people stress about when told to network.

 

That said, as with anything else, you know there’s a difference between being straightforward and being overly blunt. For example, you know to write, "I was thinking of approaching the project from a different angle" over "I hate all of your ideas."

 

Aspiring to find this balance, many people begin networking emails with "Remember me?" or even, "You probably don’t remember me..." After all, why not begin with an honest admission so the other person knows you aren’t being fake? Well, unfortunately, this approach often backfires. While you’re coming from a sincere place, it’s pretty audacious to ask for something from someone whom you’re blatantly admitting you barely know.

 


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Adele Taylor's curator insight, December 5, 2016 3:53 PM

I think this title should be about reaching out to contacts.

As the article implies networking can be scary, and might scare away readers but a good article overall.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, December 5, 2016 9:43 PM
It certainly helps to be upfront, honest and straightforward in writing Networking Emails. We have come a long way from times when it was perhaps expected that letters should run into pages, filled with flowery expression and long sentences. I found the examples in the article really helpful, and am sharing the same for others to read!
Emma Urbanek's curator insight, December 6, 2016 1:46 PM
Writing about yourself can seem nearly impossible, not anymore! 
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Here's How To Make Big Career Decisions You Won't Regret

Here's How To Make Big Career Decisions You Won't Regret | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

What makes big decisions so hard? As a decision coach, I see many people struggle with tough choices, because they really, really want to have no regrets.

 

While I’ve never met anyone who felt they got it right 100% of the time, going back to the basics can help you get clear on what you want and feel better about moving forward.

 

Here are five simple strategies I’ve learned for lessening the odds that you’ll look back and wish you did it differently.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 1, 2016 4:42 PM

Making big decisions can be challenging because you're worried you'll make the wrong choice. Here's how to minimize your likelihood of regret.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, December 4, 2016 6:52 AM

Post very interesting, revealing some aspects that I did not know about careers. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish, more about people management can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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The 1 Simple Mind Trick That Instantly Makes You More Persuasive

The 1 Simple Mind Trick That Instantly Makes You More Persuasive | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

Even as neuroscientists continue to unearth new discoveries about the human brain, some of the most effective brain hacks have been around for years. Take Blaise Pascal, for example, born in 1623. The 17th-century French philosopher, mathematician, and physicist explored human nature in his book of essays Pensées.

 

Brain Pickings sheds light on his stance on the art of persuasion: "Pascal came to see that the surest way of defeating the erroneous views of others is not by bombarding the bastion of their self-righteousness but by slipping in through the backdoor of their beliefs."

 

If you want to get someone to change their mind, you might be tempted to immediately start the discussion with talking points about why they're wrong. Pascal recommended a different approach. Start in their camp instead. Cozy up to what this person already believes, and admit there's truth in what they believe. Then, present the larger picture -- in which other angles and approaches exist. This approach is meant to lead someone into discovering another perspective or angle on their own. Instead of you doing the persuading, you're setting them up to persuade themselves.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 13, 2016 6:35 PM

Mastering the art of persuasion is as simple as beginning with "You're right."

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The Emotionally Intelligent Person's Guide To Disagreeing With Your Boss

The Emotionally Intelligent Person's Guide To Disagreeing With Your Boss | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

There are few occasions where having high emotional intelligence (EQ) comes in handy more than when you disagree with your boss. But it's hardly the only one. Many of us would even happily trade off a few IQ points in exchange for some extra EQ. In fact, people with very high IQs but lower emotional intelligence may be more likely to upset their bosses by focusing too much on the logical side of an argument while ignoring the social and emotional dimensions.

 

In fact, the most effective approach to disagreeing with your manager should really be based on EQ rather than IQ. Unsurprisingly, research suggests that employees with higher emotional intelligence are generally more rewarding to deal with, which is why they're more often promoted than those who aren't. In a world that still bases so many crucial career decisions on a single subjective factor in the eyes of one's direct manager, likability often trumps ability and work ethic.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 4, 2016 4:43 PM

Hint: Know when to cut your losses and back down.

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Here's How To Make Big Career Decisions You Won't Regret

Here's How To Make Big Career Decisions You Won't Regret | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

What makes big decisions so hard? As a decision coach, I see many people struggle with tough choices, because they really, really want to have no regrets.

 

While I’ve never met anyone who felt they got it right 100% of the time, going back to the basics can help you get clear on what you want and feel better about moving forward.

 

Here are five simple strategies I’ve learned for lessening the odds that you’ll look back and wish you did it differently.


Via The Learning Factor, Rosário Durão
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 1, 2016 4:42 PM

Making big decisions can be challenging because you're worried you'll make the wrong choice. Here's how to minimize your likelihood of regret.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, December 4, 2016 6:52 AM

Post very interesting, revealing some aspects that I did not know about careers. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish, more about people management can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

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How to Give an Emotionally Intelligent Presentation

How to Give an Emotionally Intelligent Presentation | Communicate...and how! | Scoop.it

Emotions play an active role in almost all of our decision making. That's one reason why emotional intelligence, the ability to identify, understand, and manage those emotions, is such an invaluable skill. 

 

But how specifically does emotional intelligence help us with our daily tasks? Here are three tips to make sure your next presentation is emotionally intelligent:

 

1. Don't get anxious. Get excited.

All of us get nervous before a presentation, even if we've done it hundreds of times. So take that nervousness and turn it into something positive: enthusiasm.How do you do that exactly?

Spend those final few moments reviewing your favorite parts of the presentation. Remind yourself why you're doing this, and focus on the value you have to deliver to your listeners.

Now, take that enthusiasm and give a talk that you passionately believe in.

 


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Bovee & Thill's Online Business Communication Magazines's curator insight, October 2, 2016 3:27 PM

 

"But how specifically does emotional intelligence help us with our daily tasks? Here are three tips to make sure your next presentation is emotionally intelligent: . . . "

Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, October 4, 2016 5:18 PM
The Learning Factor's insight: View your presentation from your audience's perspective instead of your own.
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The Incredible Power Of Concentration - Miyoko Shida Rigolo

https://www.facebook.com/miyoko.shida http://www.myspace.com/miyoko.shida
 
Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Dr. Susan Bainbridge's curator insight, May 30, 2013 9:20 AM

The Lesson of Teamwork.