U.S. Congress topic for Thursday, May 2nd
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Former members of Congress hold hearings on extraterrestrials [obama said he believes too]

Former members of Congress hold hearings on extraterrestrials [obama said he believes too] | U.S. Congress topic for Thursday, May 2nd | Scoop.it
Six former members of Congress began holding a hearing Monday at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C., about the government's supposed knowledge of extraterrestrial life.

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
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dakota dodds's comment, May 15, 2013 10:57 PM
This would be an interesting thing to listen about. Since there is a good chance of an area 51 being real. Otherwise why is a place in the middle of no where heavily guarded?
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US Congressman introduces bill requiring study of autism rate in vaccinated vs. unvaccinated

US Congressman introduces bill requiring study of autism rate in vaccinated vs. unvaccinated | U.S. Congress topic for Thursday, May 2nd | Scoop.it

The CDC has refused to study the autism rate in vaccinated vs. unvaccinated kids, because they are a captive agency of vaccine manufacturers. The former head of the CDC is now the head of Merck vaccines, the largest US vaccine manufacturer. CDC officials have been disrespectful, bumbling fools when required to testify before Congress.

 

The CDC is reluctant to compare autism rates in unvaxed vs. vaxed because it will likely show the same thing as the following study and survey, a huge increase in autism risk in the vaccinated. Of course such data will indict the CDC and expose their responsibility for creating the biggest epidemic in US history: Vaccine-induced autism.


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Jacob Rabe's curator insight, May 3, 2013 12:30 PM

This seems to me like it is a very demanding issue. If it is expected that the studies will show results that are not favorable, then why haven't we dont this a long time ago? Its all about the money. If these vaccines are proven to cause autism than these very large vaccine manufactures will either be out of business, or they will be spending a fortune figuring out the cause.

MsHaeussinger's comment, May 5, 2013 6:14 PM
Interesting story! This issue has gotten a lot of press in recent years from celebrities. To my knowledge they have never found a link but this could change that by infusing research dollars.
Sara Tilleman's curator insight, June 5, 2013 10:18 AM

the debate continues!

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A Congressman Decided To Insult A 4-Star General And Then Tried To Walk Out. HAHAHA.

A Congressman Decided To Insult A 4-Star General And Then Tried To Walk Out. HAHAHA. | U.S. Congress topic for Thursday, May 2nd | Scoop.it
Congressman, I wouldn't do that if I were you.
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Cybersecurity Legislation Must Not Violate Americans' Right to Privacy | We the People: Your Voice in Our Government

Cybersecurity Legislation Must Not Violate Americans' Right to Privacy | We the People: Your Voice in Our Government | U.S. Congress topic for Thursday, May 2nd | Scoop.it

Thank you for speaking out on the important issue of how cybersecurity affects privacy. The President has been clear that the United States urgently needs to modernize our laws and practices relating to cybersecurity, both for national security and the security of our country's businesses -- but that shouldn't come at the expense of privacy.

 

The White House issued a veto threat for the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA) on April 16, because the legislation did not fully address our core concerns (especially the protection of privacy). Even though a bill went on to pass the House of Representatives and includes some important improvements over previous versions, this legislation still doesn't adequately address our fundamental concerns.

 

But it's not good enough to just stop things: We've got to work together, with legislators on Capitol Hill, technology experts from the private sector, and engaged advocates like you to advance cybersecurity legislation without compromising privacy.

 

Both the government and private companies -- like individuals -- face the constant threat of cyber crime, espionage, and attacks. If a company discovers that a hacker has broken into its network and is stealing its customers' information (violating their privacy in the process), that company should be able to share what it learns about the intrusion efficiently -- how the hacker got in, what he did while inside, and what he looked for -- with the government and other companies. The government and other businesses would then be able to use this information from the hacker, not his victim, to help prevent future intrusions.

 

But you might ask, "Isn't this collaboration already happening?" The simple answer is yes, but inefficiently. When it comes to information sharing, we need clearer rules to promote collaboration and protect privacy. Right now, each company has to work out an individual arrangement with the government and other companies on what information to share about cyberthreats. This ambiguity can lead to harmful delays.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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