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A Few Negative Things to Consider About Unschooling

A Few Negative Things to Consider About Unschooling | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
A few of the cons about unschooling that should be considered.
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

The purpose of this Yahoo! Voices article about unschooling is to illustrate the cons of sending your child to an unschooling institution.  When researching this perspective about unschooling, I liked this particular content piece because it was written by someone who is actually an advocate for unschooling.  I found that for this particular Content Curation, many people have very strong opinions about one perspective about schooling and are not open to listening about what the other side has to say.  This article serves as the devil's advocate to unschooling: it was written by someone who favors it but attempts to look at through an objective lens.  The author brings up a handful of points for people to consider about unschooling, and many of them relate to what other people will think of you when you decide to send your child to a school.  However, if someone is looking out for what they believe is the best for the child, wouldn't they just disregard what those people have to say and do what you want anyway?  The one point that the author does bring up that I completely agree with is that "no testing and no grading system can make learning hard to measure."  Although I don't always agree with having an intense grading system, I do think that there must be some sort of way to track how a child is doing and how they are progressing.  This opinion article says that one way to battle this is to talk to your child when they come home and have discussions about what they learned throughout the day.  I think it will be helpful for students to do this, but I question how parents will be able to measure how their child is doing in school if he or she does not like to have an open discussion about what they did that day.  If the child does not feel comfortable having 100% open communication with the parents, I do not believe that unschooling will be successful for a child.  After researching both perspectives regarding unschooling, I strongly believe that unschooling is an appropriate alternative to traditional schooling...but only for a child with the right type of personality.  If the child is a mature, focused, social, curious, and an open communicator, then I really feel as though unschooling could be the best option for him or her.

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Why I’m marching for charter schools 

Why I’m marching for charter schools  | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
Dowdell: I like a lot of what Bill de Blasio says. I believe he wakes up in the morning thinking about people like my family and our friends — people who are working hard but find it harder than ever to make it in New York.
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

Opposite to the opinion article posted for the movie "Won't Back Down," as well as an article that I found a couple of months ago regarding the damage that charter schools can have on public school, this opinion article notes that having a child sent to a charter school is the best thing that could happen to that child.  The author of this article says that her daughter was lucky because now she will be able to get the best education she believes that everyone deserves, but not many people get in New York City.  This woman argues that charging charter schools for renting facilities when public schools do not have to do this is unfair since this will cause these charter schools to fall apart.  

 

What is most interesting to me though, is that this is the one of the most opinionated articles that I've found regarding charter schools.  I have not come across someone who feels this passionately about not sending his or her child to public school.  The woman goes as far to quote: 'I am going to be one of the thousands of parents, teachers, and students marching across the the Brooklyn Bridge to stand strong with one message: Every student deserves a great school and every parent deserves a choice."  This statement personally bothers me, because it seems that the woman in this article is not even willing to attempt to become involved in public schools and figure out a way to change them as other articles I have found explain as a possible way to address public schools and charter schools.  If she feels so passionately about the change that charter schools can provide and all of its abundant opportunities that are better for inner city children, then I feel as though she should transfer that passion to improving the public school system.  I might be biased, since doing this project has made me realize that I think the only way public schools will improve is if everyone becomes invested in the system.  But I believe that people focusing on charter schools should take some of that energy and transfer it to working on the public school system in order to improve it for everyone.

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Magnet-school resurgence? A Q&A with Richard Kahlenberg | Hechinger Report

Magnet-school resurgence? A Q&A with Richard Kahlenberg | Hechinger Report | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
Informing the Public about Education through Quality Journalism
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

Ever since beginning research about magnet schools, I've always wondered how a parent chooses a magnet school over a charter school when looking for where to send their child for an education since they seem very similar to one another.  This interview transcript with Richard Kahlenberg sheds some light on one important difference between charter schools and magnet schools.  Kahlenberg mentions that although much more federal funding is given to charters schools that magnet schools, magnet schools far exceed in enrollment.  One benefit to both, however, is that these schools are more racial and socioeconomically integrated than public schools are.  This makes a lot of sense to me, considering that since a public school is concentrated in one area, the school most likely has students who are of similar background.  Since charter schools and magnet schools cover a much wider area that students are from, they attract many more students that have a variety of backgrounds.  I think this is a major benefit to sending a child to either a charter or magnet school.  Since students are going to be exposed to people that are much different from their backgrounds when they go to college or when they have a professional job after graduation, they are most likely going to work with people who have a different background.  Having students go to school with students from other areas may prepare them for experiences they are going to have when they are older.

 

What I find most interesting about this interview, however, is that Kahlenberg mentions that "magnet schools and charter schools both enroll larger shares of black and Latino students than regular public schools, but magnets are far more integrated than charter schools...most charter schools are more segregated than regular public schools."  I have not been able to establish why that is based on this interview, but I think that is extremely interesting to note, especially if someone who is looking to have their children attend a charter school is of a minority background.  The article does mention that it is possible this happens because students attend charter schools in 'highly segregated settings.'  Perhaps having the school situated in an area like this has an effect on what the environment of the school is like.  I believe that magnet schools, since they attract students from an extremely wide area, may avoid this situation much better than public or charter schools.

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If You Send Your Kid to Private School, You Are a Bad Person

If You Send Your Kid to Private School, You Are a Bad Person | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
You are a bad person if you send your children to private school. Not bad like murderer bad—but bad like ruining-one-of-our-nation’s-most-essential-institutions-in-order-to-get-what’s-best-for-your-kid bad.
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

This is one last insight I'm going to include about the debate on public vs. private school.  This opinion blurb offered one piece of information that I have not thought of in this dispute about which form of schooling is better:

 

"Reading this blurb makes it seem to me that if every single parent sent every single child to public school, public schools would improve.  This would not happen immediately.  It could take generations...So, how exactly would this work?  It's simple!  Everyone needs to be invested in our public schools in order for them to get better...Your local school stinks and you do send your child there?  I bet you are going to do everything within your power to make it better."

 

Out of all the perspectives I've read about the different types of schools, this is definitely the one I agree with most.  I've mentioned in some other responses that I was glad that I went to public school not simply for the education that I received there, but for the experience I had there.  I met people from all different backgrounds with different family experiences, and it really allowed me to evaluate my place in the world, where I fit in society, and what I can do to make it better.  Since public school is open to everyone, I feel as though you can learn the most from this because you can't pick the type of people you are going to be exposed to.  I also really liked how this opinion blurb mentioned that if your child has problems with behavior or learning that it is better to send your child to public school.  I believe that not only will this allow for the child to adjust to working with all different kinds of people, and in turn the public school systems may improve their programs for specialized needs because they have to be able to find the resources necessary to accomodate individuals who may require other forms of teaching, more individualized attention, etc.  

 

I strongly believe that both students and schools can gain from everyone sending their children to public schools.  However, with the recent hype about the benefits of going to private school, I don't know how every parent is going to be convinced that public school is the best option.  

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Mom Interview with Aline Feledy, supermom and Montessori teacher | The Uncommon Moms

Mom Interview with Aline Feledy, supermom and Montessori teacher | The Uncommon Moms | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

This website provided a blog interview of a woman who is a Montessori school teacher.  She provides her personal insight about Montessori teaching and why she believes that Montessori schools can be a great approach to schooling for young children.  After researching this topic, and as I've mentioned in another insight that I posted, I believe that there is no right or wrong method of schooling because there is there is a type of school that is able to fit each individual's specified needs.  This teacher brings up a point about Montessori schools that I never considered before.  Montessori schools focus a lot on the theme of 'care': care for who you are as an inidividual, care for the environment that you are placed in, care for others in the classroom, etc.  She mentions that this emphasis of care would be beneficial for students who come from households where they experience physical or sexual abuse.  I had never thought about the Montessori approach to education as being as helpful to this, but I sincerely feel that this type of schooling would be great for students who have experienced this.  Learning to care for the environment, the self, other people, and being in an environment where the teacher is not seen as being dominant might really assist students who have experienced abuse. It may also encourage them to develop a strong and stable self-schema. This intense desire to help students and look out for their needs reminds me a lot of the reasoning why parents decide to send their children to private school. If parents are very interested in private schooling in general, I believe that they should definitely take Montessori schools into consideration.  

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Costs and Benefits of Private Schools: Is the Extra Money Worth It? --Educational Connections

Educational Connections: http://ECtutoring.com/ Like Us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/educationalconnections Follow Us on Twitter: https://twitter.com...
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

After doing extensive research about the debate between private and public schools, I stumbled upon this video.  I think this gives a great perspective about the costs and benefits of private schools. The woman speaking is aiming her discussion at parents looking into sending their student to a private school.  She brings up a lot of great points about private schools that I would not have thought about otherwise.  In addition to some of the points that most people bring up about private schools (more academic rigor, more structure, individualized attention, etc.), she brings up a couple of points I have never considered before.

 

1) For example, she states that there is a private school out there for everyone.  If you are a parent and your child suffers from ADHD, there is a school that will fit his/her needs.  If your child wants to play sports and you think that your designated public school's team is too rigorous or does not challenge them, you can find a school that will meet their athletic needs.  

 

2) Private schools base their funding on donations and endowments, and some schools receive up to $100 million.  That means that these schools can help more with financial aid to students, as well as afford better technology and sports equipment.

 

3) Often times if a college receives an application between two students that have the same GPA and SAT scores and one went to private school while the other went to public school, they will pick the student who went to the private school.  This is because the private school may have a reputation for producing top tier students within that institution.

 

I'm very glad that I came across this video.  I have always felt that I have a large bias toward public education, simply because everyone who has been in my family has gone to public school.  However, this video makes me reconsider my opinion about private schools.  I think there are a lot of great benefits that can come out of going to these schools.  I feel as though most people have a good idea about which type of school is better, but even after doing extensvie research I feel as though I do not side with one type of school or the other. 

 

My opinion, however, is this: I think that private schools are the right choice for a student if there is any reason why parents feel that their designated school does not have enough to offer to their child.  And now that many schools offer a large amount of financial aid, the decision to send a child to private school can be even easier.  If the parents do not feel as though their child needs specialization in a school for whatever reason, public schools are still a fantastic option.

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New Study Explains How and Why Parents Choose Private Schools

New Study Explains How and Why Parents Choose Private Schools | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
Parents are almost universally more satisfied with their chosen school over their child's assigned district school.
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

This blog post published by the CATO Institute lead me to break down some preconcieved ideas that I had about why parents decide to enroll their students in private schools.  Previous to reading this article and based on research that I've done for my other Scoop It pages, I assumed that parents decide to enroll their children in private schools when they are frustrated with the standardized testing that takes place in public schools.  However, when a survey was taken by parents who decided to put their children through a private education, their top five reasons included more individual attention for their chidlren, smaller class size, and bettet descipline.  According to the article, "only 10.2% of the parents who completed the survey listed higher standardized test scores as one of their top five reasons why they chose a particular private school for their child."  It is interesting to see that many other factors are the main reason why parents choose private schools rather than concern for standardized testing.  Further research will be done to see if there really is a difference in discipline or if students get more individualized attention in private schools as compared to public schooling.

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School types: The difference between public, private, magnet, charter, and more

School types: The difference between public, private, magnet, charter, and more | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
School types: The difference between public, private, magnet, charter, and more
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

This information page provides basic information about the different types of schools.  I feel this is necessary to know for providing a foundation for future research.  Before starting this project, I had no idea about what types of school exist other than public and private.  This website is where I learned about the difference between charter, magnet, private, and public.  Learning this information is very valuable since I'm still not sure what type of school I would like to teach in upon graduation.  I'm glad to do a curation about this topic since I think it will really help me to figure out where I should start looking to apply to schools and to pick one that matches my values and thoughts about what a school should be like.

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I'm Unschooled. Yes, I Can Write.: New to this blog? New to Unschooling? Read this!

I'm Unschooled. Yes, I Can Write.: New to this blog? New to Unschooling? Read this! | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

This is the first insight I'm writing about unschooling, which is a type of school that I have not focused on yet.  I stumbled upon this blog post, and I thought the author laid out a lot of great points as to why unschooling is beneficial for children.  The author is an unschooled student who is pretty much finished with her education. The page that I scooped is the introduction page to the entire blog, and the author included one quote that I really like.  This is one of the definitions she writes regarding what unschooling is: "Unschooling, at its heart, is nothing more complicated or simple than the realization that life and learning are not two separate things.  And when you realize that living and learning are inseparable, it all truly starts to make sense."  I think this is the biggest advantage that unschooling has compared to other types of schooling.  All too often you hear of students in school becoming frustrated with what they are learning because they don't understand why they are learning something that they believe they are never going to use again.  I believe to some degree, when students have this attitude toward a subject in school, that no matter how a student is taught a subject they do not like that they will not learn anything from it.  I know that I personally remember nothing from high school chemistry, since I hated the subject so much and wanted nothing to do with it upon graduation.  I feel as though unschooling provides a great alternative because students can work only on whatever they are interested in, and only that topic if that's what they desire to learn.  Because students end up only focusing on what they like, they will end up learning much more about the topic they are studying because they want to like and understand it.  Although only focusing on their interests does not allow for students to sit and hear about as broad of a range of topics that students in other types of schools are exposed to, I would argue that this type of schooling may prove that it's better to deeply understand one topic than it is know minimal knowledge about multiple subjects.  The author of the blog addresses this in the introduction page of her blog: "By unschooling, we're simply removing a lot of the unnecessary obstacles and pointless exercises found in schooling, and giving the individual the power to choose which unpleasant things they feel are worthwhile doing to do, and which ones they feel are not."  I could not have phrased it better myself.  Further research will be done to read about the opposite perspective about unschooling and learn about the "negative" aspects of choosing this type of schooling.

 

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What Won't Back Down Doesn't Get Quite Right

What Won't Back Down Doesn't Get Quite Right | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
Won't Back Down will not enlighten. It will feed polarization and contribute to the misguided habits of thought that already plague educational policy-making in this country.
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

This is a movie review written by a former high school teacher and highlights the movie "Won't Back Down," released in late 2012.  This movie follows two women as they attempt to save a failing inner city school by making it into a charter school.  It exemplifies the commonly held idea that public education can be fixed by turning it into a charter school.  Before I even get to my insight about the article that is written, I have to address how I feel about turning to charter schools as the 'answer' to failing schools.  I don't think it is right to make this statement, since I believe that there are a lot of factors that go into finding a way to improve schools other than changing the way it is structured or funded.  I think the way that schools are depends on the attitude of the family who's child is entering the school.  After doing research for this project, one that I've noticed consistently is that parents have a say to change schools for the better if they do not like the way that a program is running.  Parents can work together to push school boards to increase funding by raising money for the school, or for funding for programs to be moved around so that everyone is satisfied with the way that the school is working.  Although parents do not have the overall power to make the decisions, they can try their best to push school boards in ways that they feel will benefit their children the most by working with teachers and the board effectively.  Parents cannot be overpowering, but rather need to work together with other factors to make schools the best they can for their children.

 

To tie this into the movie review that this former school teacher wrote, I agree with a lot of what he is saying.  Simply deciding to change a school because someone decides that it needs to be changed is not going to work out well.  As he puts it in his opinion article, "the film demonizes teacher unions, provides a distorted and extreme characterization of a failing school and its personnel, and sees parent empowerment laws and character schools as THE solution.  It provides a myopic and romanticized view of how to solve our educational problems."  Also important, he notes that "parents who are working to improve their schools can really be heroes.  But the greatest success has taken place where parents, teachers, educational leaders and sometimes policy makers have worked together to bring about change."  I feel as though the author's viewpoint parallels much of my opinion about the issue.  I don't think that making parents the center of the issue is going to save anything, neither is completely revamping the school and change it into another form of schooling.  I especially don't think that this should be considered in an inner city setting since research from another article I scooped has shown that charter school students are more exposed to racial segregation that students in public schools.  At the end of the day, I think people have to take movies regarding education policies with a grain of salt. I can understand why people would find "Won't Back Down" an inspirational film, but individuals must take precaution when using these sources to formulate their opinions about charter schools vs. public schools.  People should not underestimate the power that strong collaboration between parents, school boards, teachers, etc. can have on saving a school system.  Although there is nothing wrong per say with charter schools, they should not be viewed as the saving grace when acknowledging that a school needs help to turn around.

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BCA_AdmissionsInfoBooklet_2013-2014.pdf

Victoria Bellmay's insight:

This admissions booklet contains all of the information necessary for people who are interested in applying to go to the magnet high school from my county in Northern New Jersey.  From what I know of the admissions process and students who have gone to this high school, it is an extremely rigorous program.  Students are placed into one of their many programs depending on their interests, including business and finance, performing arts, engineering, medical sciences, etc.  I think that this school is beneficial for students who are very intelligent, can handle a tough courseload, and are mature enough to take on the responsibility for fully preparing for their future major in college as well as their future career. I think this is also great for students who are interested in the specialization that private schools can provide without having to spend money on an education.  

 

There are two major benefits that I see that this magnet school offers that other types of schools do not.  The first is that since it is a public school, it does not cost anything to go there.  Tax dollars from the county pay for the school, and because of this it is competitive for students in my county to gain admission.  However, it rivals private schools because students receive a top notch education that parents may be looking for from a private school without having to pay the cost.  

 

The second major benefit that this school offers is that colleges know that this is not only the top school in the county, but one of the top magnet schools in the country.  It is not uncommon to hear that students who go here are often admitted to ivy leagues or other top institutions in this country.  I think that part of this comes from the extreme preparation the students receive from the program they are a part of within the school.  All of the knowledge they receive and electives they take that correspond with this program culminates in a 'senior experience' during their senior year.  The admissions booklet explains it as such:  "The Academies focuses on developing students’ readiness for the workplace. To help students prepare for their professional futures, the Academies requires that each student in the 12th grade complete an internship program called 'Senior Experience.'"  After taking EDCI280, I realize how important it is to have exposure to the potential careers you could be interested in.  Having an internship experience, even if it is only for one day a week, really allows for you to understand some aspects of a potential future career that you would not have thought about otherwise.  It can really help you understand if that career is the right fit for you.  The fact that this school allows for students to experience that while they are still in high school is an amazing opportunity.  If I had a child who was extraordinarily bright, I would send them to this school in a heartbeat.  It seems like there are programs, classes, etc. available to these students that are simply not available to students who are in public schools.

 

Although I feel as though Bergen County Academies is a fine example of magnet schools and what they can offer an individual, I will further research about magnet schools to gain perspectives regarding what other people have to say about them.

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The Great Montessori Schism

The Great Montessori Schism | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
The divisive history of the popular school system, and what it teaches us about education and change
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

When I did my research on Montessori schooling, I continually saw two different acronyms being used: AMS  and AMI.  These two acronyms stand for the two different branches of Montessori schools that exist today.  Previous to reading this article, I thought that all Montessori schools would be similar. since they seemed to have the same principles. However, I was definitely wrong about that.  One group seems to be much more conservative in adhering to strict Montessori policies than the other group.  AMI (Association Montessori International) strives to maintain the same policies that Maria Montessori strived for when creating this type of education.  

 

AMS (American Monetessori Society), however, is more open to an adaptive approach to the education.  As the website quotes: "AMS insisted that all teacher educators have a college degree so that the courses could be recognized by state education departments.  AMS also broadended the curriculum for teachers and sought to forge with mainstream education by offering Montessori coursework in traditional teacher preparation programs."  This would mean sacrificing some of the unique, core ideals that the Montessori schools have.  In a response I wrote to an information page I found about this type of schooling, I noted that there are some very large differences between Montessori schools and public schools.  These differences lie in the role of the classroom teacher as well as encouragement for students to aid in each other's work.  The ideal that the AMS has makes me wonder if some of these distinguishable characteristics that truly make a school a Montessori school will be sacrificed.  The writer of this opinion article notes that perhaps there is a benefit to AMI's approach to Montessori schooling, because research was recently conducted that shows "decrease in tactile play has hurt the development of children's motor skills."  

 

Again, this further emphasizes what I feel about the differences in types of schools.  I think before parents decide where they want to send their children, they first have to do extensive research to figure out what type of schooling would be beneficial to them.  Once they make that decision, they have to choose which type of school within that category would be best for them.  Parents may decide that they definitely want to send their child to a Montessori school, but they have to choose whether the AMS or AMI approach to schooling would be better suited for that child's needs.  If they want a more 'hands on' approach to learning, I think that AMI would be the best choice for them.  However, if they prefer the Montessori principles but still like some of what public schools incorporate as well, perhaps AMS would be a better choice for them because this choice is more inclined to take suggestions for teaching from other forms of schooling.

 

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Montessori School in NJ Bergen County Northern NJ Montessori School NJ

Montessori School in NJ Bergen County Northern NJ Montessori School NJ | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
Montessori School Park Ridge NJ, Northern NJ Montessori School, NJ Montessori Learning Center, NJ Montessori School in NJ, Montessori School Bergen County
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

This is the information page for a Montessori school that is located in part of the church that my family attends back home in New Jersey.  I would always see the school classrooms while walking through the church building, but I never knew anything about the school.  I feel as though Montessori schools are not talked about that often in my hometown area, and when I asked my parents if they knew anything about the school they were unable to tell me the difference between this school and public schools.

 

Montessori schools are a very interesting concept to me, and this page highlights two main differences that I see between the public schools that I've attended and the Montessori approach to schools.  The first is that students are not encouraged to share with each other in Montessori schools.  Children do not touch another child's work or intrude what they are doing.  They have the option to become involved in group activities, but they are not forced into doing this because the ability to work with others develops when a student gains security with himself/herself.  This is the exact opposite from what is learned in public schools.  From a young age, public school students work with other children, create projects together, and work together in discussion circles to talk about social justice issues or topics they are learning in class.  I actually like the approach that Montessori schools strive for better.  When I was growing up, I did not like working with other students on projects.  I still do not like doing so to this day because I feel as though I cannot trust the work that other people are producing.  I wonder if my feelings toward group work would have been different if I was placed into an environment where establishing self-security first, and then encouraged to work with others after I gained that level of self-identity.

 

The second difference that I notice is that Montessori teachers do not assume an authoritative stance in the classroom.  They step back and let the child understand what his/her place in the classroom is by communicating at eye level rather than hovering over him/her.  In the traditional public school model, the teacher is seen standing in the front of the classroom while the students have desks that face the teacher's direction.  It is clear that the teacher is the dominant figure in the class with no exception.  When it comes to this, I personally prefer the public school approach.  I feel as though the Montessori teachers may be too gentle on its students in this regard.  I think that children need to understand at least some degree of discipline that public school offers because it prepares them for the type of environment they will be involved in when they are in college or when they have a job.

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dp114197.pdf

Victoria Bellmay's insight:

I stumbled upon this very interesting research paper while looking for a scientific journal article that provides evidence that private schools could be better than public schools.  Although this paper is very long, I'll provide what I consider to be a good summary of the paper and a very concise explanation as to why   they believe private schools are more effective.  From page 2:

 

"Some basic emperial evidenance seems to bear out this contention: Private-school students routinely perform at a higher level on standardized tests and are more likely to graduate from high school and attend college than their public-school counterparts, even with many other observed differences, such as family income, parental education levels, and school inputs, held constant."

 

I think the writers bring up a great point in their summary of the issue.  Many people believe that students do better in private schools for a multitude of reasons, but this is one that I believe is difficult for people against private schooling to argue (since there seems to be a great amount of valid evidence to back up the claims).  However, I do have a couple of problems with the approach to this article.  I went to a public high school and I received a great education.  My teachers were well educated and over 95% of my graduating class chose to attend college.  I think the debate between the effectiveness of private schools vs. public schools comes into play the most when the neighborhood and household income a student's family has comes into effect.  I was lucky enough to come from a well-off area, so I feel as though I received what would be considered a 'top notch' education that people could find in a private school.  Someone who lives in a poorer area may not have the same fortunate opportunities that I did and therefore private education may make a difference.  

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Gonzalez: Parents, educators fed up with special treatment of charter schools

Gonzalez: Parents, educators fed up with special treatment of charter schools | Types of Schools | Scoop.it
Like many public school parents and veteran educators, Lynn Manuell is fed up with the special treatment granted charter schools during the Bloomberg era.
Victoria Bellmay's insight:

For those of you who may not know as much about charter schools, they are basically schools that receives funding from the public, but are owned and operated privately.  They can also receive funding from private donations.  Sometimes they are seen as a good alternative to traditional public schooling, particularly in relation for students who live in a poorer environment or those who have special needs in school.  However, this article brings up a great point about co-locating charter schools and public schools.  When this happens, both schools share the same building, even though they operate under separate conditions.  There are many complaints about this happening.  Many public school teachers and parents feel frustrated with the attention that the charter schools that are being co-located with them are producing.  One public teacher in the article stated, "We lost our technology room, our music room, our art room, and we had to start sharing the cafeteria, the gym and the playground." I think including both schools in one location can be beneficially, specifically when one family has two children that may have different needs.  One may be better suited for a traditional school system, while the other may fit beter into a charter school.  If this occurs, schools just have to be mindful of sharing resources equally and not putting one school's needs over the other's.

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