TwitterNews
89 views | +0 today
Follow
TwitterNews
How effective is Twitter as an alternative source for daily news?
Curated by Johnnymushio
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

How effective is Twitter as an alternative source for daily news?

I have used Twitter in the past, and have been using Twitter for class these past few months. I often see people in our class posting interesting links to recent news articles, but anyone I see tweeting outside of class is usually just typing conversational topics and pointless babble, not that conversational topics are bad. I often hear how Twitter is the new revolutionary news outlet, but aside from class, I rarely see any news on Twitter at all. The worldwide trending topics sometimes has a good news topic, but the other nine topics are usually just conversational. But, not conversational between two people, it's more like throwing a note into a room of a million people and hoping someone reads it.

 

When Osama Bin Laden was killed last year, Twitter kept on coming up on all the news reports online. For example, prior to the gulf war, CNN was a pretty obscure and boring channel to watch the news on. The local news was much more efficient. Could events like the Libyan protests and Osama Bin Laden's death do for Twitter what the gulf war did for CNN? Is Twitter really becoming the go-to news outlet for this century? How affective is it? These are the questions I sought out to find.

 

The most surprising thing I learned from my research is that Twitter thinks of itself more as a news outlet than a social network. Actually, the VP of business and corporate development says Twitter is not a social network, rather, a place to go for news and information. And, as you may have guessed, Twitter can't be competed with when it comes to breaking news the fastest, although, often the news that is true is lost in a sea of rumors. Even rumors that have been proven wrong by mainstream news outlets still continue to linger around Twitter upwards to an hour. Also, Twitter lacks the credibility that mainstream news outlets have. Usually news only becomes news and starts to spread once a mainstream news outlets reports it, before that it is just a rumor.

 

Where Twitter truly shines is live news, such as during a major event or crisis. A mainstream news outlet can only cover so much in so little time, but on Twitter you can read tweets for days and still have more to read. Not only that, but by reading tweets from eyewitnesses, the reader gets a sense of being there.

 

So, to answer the question: How effective is Twitter as an alternate source of news? If you follow a lot of mainstream news outlets and journalists, it is very effective. To just browse Twitter for random tweets regarding news, not very effective at all. It is hit and miss really. Every now and then a rare case like Osama Bin Laden's death will come up that turns out to be true, but more often than not people are fooled into believing living people have recently died, even though they are still alive. As for Twitter's future, based on what I have read, I would say it would start gearing more towards the delivery of news, rather than communication with friends.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

Twitter-Study-August-2009.pdf

To put things into perspective, according to this study, there are actually more spam tweets being posted to Twitter than news tweets. 3.6% of all tweets are about news, and 3.8% of all tweets are spam. The study is a few years old, so the numbers could have changed significantly since then. In 2009, the majority of tweets posted to Twitter are conversational and pointless babble. Although this indicates Twitter is not mainly being used for as a news source, it still does not indicate the quality of the news being posted. It also does not also take into account views of the articles the news tweets link to. It could just indicate people read the news more than they tweet about it.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

How do I cite a tweet?

How do I cite a tweet? | TwitterNews | Scoop.it

Keeping my question in mind, whether or not Twitter is an effective alternate source for news, this page directly sheds some light onto the answer. To be effective, it must be reliable and credible. Two years ago, would a tweet be able to cited in an academic paper? What if sources had to be cited using MLA? It looks like in 2011, tweets were given their own page on the MLA website. Tweets can be a very good source. For example, a tweet from a company's Twitter account could reveal new information about a product. The fact that the MLA has dedicated a whole page just to describe how to cite a tweet says a lot about the credibility of a single tweet. Twitter accounts being “verified” also helps.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

If you think Twitter doesn't break news, you're living in a dream world

If you think Twitter doesn't break news, you're living in a dream world | TwitterNews | Scoop.it
Debates about whether Twitter breaks news or not miss the point about how the news game has changed with the arrival of social media and the democratization of distribution it provides.

 

This article sheds a little more light onto whether or not Twitter really is responsible for breaking news such as Osama Bin Laden's or Whitney Houstan's death. In the American Journalism Review, a writer mentions that although Twitter was the first place where news of the information of the two individuals death was mentioned, it was not until the information was confirmed by mainstream news sources that the information started to spread. It could even be argued that even though Twitter was the first place where the news broke out, it simply was not news at the time. At the time the very first tweets of the two individuals deaths were posted to Twitter, the information was simply not news yet as there was no evidence to support that the tweets were true. So, although Twitter was the first place to break the news, it was only a rumor until confirmed by mainstream news sources. This ties in perfectly to the lack of fact checking on Twitter, as opposed to mainstream news outlets.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

Twitter As Breaking News Source

Twitter As Breaking News Source | TwitterNews | Scoop.it

This article confirms that when it comes to breaking news, Twitter is king, mentioning how Twitter broke the news of Osama Bin Laden's death before any news outlet did. Although, there are some problems with this. Prior to the days of the Internet, people got their news only once a day, so there was time to check their sources. Now with the Internet and especially Twitter, people get their news 24/7, whether the news is real or not. Once a tweet is sent out, there is no going back. The article also mentions that old news that has been proven false by news outlets still floats around Twitter for hours. The article concludes by saying that since so much news is coming at us so fast thanks to social network sites like Twitter, the meaning of it all is lost and forgotten in a sea of never ending news articles being streamed to individuals around the world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

Tweeting the terror: How social media reacted to Mumbai - CNN.com

Tweeting the terror: How social media reacted to Mumbai - CNN.com | TwitterNews | Scoop.it

This is an article published in Twitter's early years. Several years ago there was a terrorist attack in India. The article claims that “most” of the tweets were sourced from mainstream media. The article does mention the large amount of eyewitnesses tweeting about the event, but tends to lean more toward mainstream media being responsible for spreading the information out first, not the eyewitnesses. If this were to be true, credibility would have to play a factor in this. If some random person tweeted about a bomb going off, it would most likely go unnoticed by everyone, even if he got the information out to the world first. Had a credible news organization tweeted about the news, as they did, it would spread much more quickly. It's a tricky question. If a news organizations puts information out on Twitter to get it out to the people, who takes the credit for getting that information out? Twitter, or the news organization? I would answer that question by saying it is not one or the other, they both work together to get the information out to the world as fast as possible.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

Twitter is NOT a Social Network, Says Twitter Exec

Twitter is NOT a Social Network, Says Twitter Exec | TwitterNews | Scoop.it
Kevin Thau, Twitter's VP for business and corporate development, announced during a presentation at Nokia World 2010 today that everyone's favorite micro-blogging network is not actually a social network.

 

This is a perfect article to end my quest for information to answer my question. Apparently, Twitter is not even a social network, the essence of Twitter is news and information. According to Twitter's VP for business and corporate development, Twitter is “not a social network”, and is “transforming the nature of news.” It's interesting that he says this, since every other person who uses Twitter would tell you otherwise. Every site I look up describing what Twitter is tells me it is a social networking/micro blogging site. Just because he is the VP of business and corporate development doesn't mean what he says is true. Maybe Twitter started off as a social network, and has slowly evolved into a news and information source. So, then what are blogs? Information sources. So, are they not social networks? If a social network is defined as a network of people, then yes, Twitter is a social network. But, since Twitter's focus is on news, it is simply a social network that tries to focus on news.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

Is Twitter a Valid News Source? | Strategic Social Media

Is Twitter a Valid News Source? | Strategic Social Media | TwitterNews | Scoop.it

This article brings up a very good point. The example the article gives is the BP oil spill in 2010, but an example I am more familiar with is the 2011 tsunami and earthquake in Japan. This is not only a problem for Twitter, but all online news in general. For example, a person could watch the news on TV and sympathize for the people. But if that same person were to get the news via Twitter, surely they would start seeing people compare the event to Hurricane Katrina, and comedians making jokes of the situation live as it is happening. It is hard to feel sympathetic for the people in the horrible situation like that when, along with the news, you read pages of comments of people bickering back and fourth about nothing related to the situation at hand.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

Tottenham Riots: David Cameron Recalls Parliament During Ongoing Crisis

Tottenham Riots: David Cameron Recalls Parliament During Ongoing Crisis | TwitterNews | Scoop.it

Twitter can be used as the main and only source for news during a crisis, as this article mentions. This article deals with the London riots of 2011. What is particularly interesting about this article is that it is not trying to persuade the reader to think one way or the other about Twitter being used as a news source. In fact, the article is not about Twitter at all. Twitter is first mentioned well into the middle of the article. “We locked all the doors, and my wife even packed a bag to flee. We had Twitter rolling until midnight just to keep up with the news.” This quote, from a person who was living where the riots were taking place, shows how well Twitter is suited for on-the-go news, especially during a crisis and/or disaster. In fact, you cannot read about a crisis these days without Twitter coming up in one way or another.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

Is Twitter The 21st Century News Source?

Is Twitter The 21st Century News Source? | TwitterNews | Scoop.it

This article covers a wide variety of topics, describing how Twitter could be the news source for the 21st century. One of the things the article mentions is how people were disappointed with how little news outlets such as CNN covered the Iranian protests, saying Twitter was a much better place to go to get more details about the situation, and even read live tweets from the protestors. The article also mentions many negatives as well. As opposed to traditional news interviews, there is no follow-up questions on Twitter. The tweet is stand-alone, and in many cases there is no other way to find out more about the subject than to ask the person who tweeted it. Had the person choose to break the news on TV, for example, then there would be an opportunity for follow up questions. Twitter is much more one-sided than a tradition news outlet, and there is little to no fact checking. The article concludes by saying Twitter is chaotic and unreliable, and that there needs to be a way to shape the chaotic mess of news on Twitter into something less chaotic.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

TechCrunch | I Can't Believe Some People Are Still Saying Twitter Isn't A News Source

TechCrunch | I Can't Believe Some People Are Still Saying Twitter Isn't A News Source | TwitterNews | Scoop.it

This article comments about people rejecting Twitter as a credible news source. This article, like the previous article, was written during the terrorist attack of India in 2008. This article quotes CNN as saying that the day of those terrorist attacks was when Twitter officially became a news source to be reckoned with. The main complaint with Twitter is the credibility of the tweets. The article admits to this, but claims the good information floods out the bad information, and that brand-new and raw news straight from the scene is better than news written after the scene. I'd also like to mention that inaccurate information has been around as long as news has, it is not just a problem for Twitter, but a problem for any news outlet.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Johnnymushio
Scoop.it!

Nieman Reports | Twitter: Can It Be a Reliable Source of News?

Nieman Reports | Twitter: Can It Be a Reliable Source of News? | TwitterNews | Scoop.it

This article talks about how five radio hosts isolated themselves away from society for five days and only got their news from social media sites, especially Twitter. Although, they were not to follow any news organization or media outlet. Every single ounce of news they got were from individuals. The radio hosts were able to read some news, but the news they were able to read was not very diverse, and not necessarily important. One of the radio hosts found out about a man who got arrested for protesting in Moscow. Everyone found out there was a strange sound above a city, but no one was able to figure out what the sound was until they were able to read about it on a traditional news site. The radio hosts also mentioned the difficulty in creating the right network of people to follow in order to get a wide and diverse range of news. One of the most important things the article mentions is how little news organization's tweets were re-tweeted. Individual's tweets were much more likely to get re-tweeted, such as a tweet from a journalist. The article concludes by saying traditional news outlets are still important, as they are the backbone for most news related tweets.

more...
No comment yet.