Twitter in Sports and Podcasts in Sports
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Carefully breaking down the top sports podcasts.

Carefully breaking down the top sports podcasts. | Twitter in Sports and Podcasts in Sports | Scoop.it
While the ESPN Baseball Today podcast has recently been revamped and is now more TV without pictures than inside scoops for the ardent devotee and amateur sabermatrician, it still ranks among my top podcasts for all sports.
Sean O'Donnell's insight:

8. "I've started to realize that the best podcasts are nothing like television at all. Podcasts are for the avid, the diehards, the ones who care so much about a topic that they will actively seek it out in every possible medium: The people who want their obsessions to, literally, follow them around."

 

9. Unlike something such as television where people watch while doing something else, a podcast is like a good book where a person becomes so into the topic its like they are in the room with the people discussing the topic.

 

10.  Most people who listen to podcasts are not casual listeners.  They are people who have a deep interest in the topic and want to continue to listen to more about the topic.  If people were not so interested in the topics, they would just listen to music.

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Interview Questions with Cody Elias

 

 

1.      1. What is your favorite part about working in the sports broadcasting industry? To be completely honest, working in sports radio is something that I never imagined that I would be doing. When I lived in Pittsburgh, I imagined myself working in TV as I interned for KDKA as a sports reporter. I was sent to cover local sports including the Penguins, Steelers, Pirates, Pitt and high school sports including Penn Trafford High School. My favorite part of working in the sports media field now is that I get paid to talk about sports with media professionals in the 4th largest market in the United States, which is San Francisco.

 

2.      2. How did you get interested in the sports broadcasting industry? I would say that I first gathered interest in sports broadcasting when I was still in high school. I know a lot about sports, meaning players, stats, teams etc… I was always told that I should pursue working in the media, either as a broadcaster, columnist, reporter or host. When I first started college, I didn’t plan on being a sports broadcasting or broadcasting professional at all, I was going to be a history teacher at a university with the plans of getting a doctorate. I made the switch to do broadcasting because it was my passion and my true calling in life, and I am really glad that I made the decision.

      3.      What is it like working in the sports broadcasting industry? Working in sports broadcasting is exciting and hard work. For me, working in radio is really easy. Since I am a producer and sound engineer, I have a lot of responsibilities. You begin to build chemistry with the hosts you work with. I normally work 5-6 hours a day on nights and weekends. My passion for the radio industry grows more and more each day; it just takes a long time to build your way up in the market and industry. My workload is not necessarily massive; I just have a lot of responsibility. My responsibilities include: booking guests, write teases and segments, screening callers, running the audio board, making actualities (Interviews) and highlights from sporting events like the Golden State Warriors and Oakland Athletics as well as updating social media websites such as Facebook and Twitter with scoring updates and show updates as well. My typical workday is not stressful, just a lot of moving parts that need to be executed on a regular basis.

  scr 4.  Describe what your normal day of work is like? My workdays are about the same every day. I get to work an hour before I am scheduled. I talk with the hosts and producers working the shows before me and then I get into my work. I usually start by setting up my logs for the show, this includes inserting music beds for breaks, host liners so the audience knows who they are listening too, opens to introduce the hosts and the most important part, the commercials. After I complete this, I begin working on highlights and actualities for the shows to use and the next day as well. I typically do around 15-20 “Cuts” a day, which range between 8-20 seconds each. I am counted on to get the news stories for the hosts and get statistics because my nickname is the Elias Sports Bureau at work, so I am counted on more than most people. During the live shows, I am responsible the audio board when I am a sound engineer. This job entails maintaining the meter readers, the sound levels for each microphone that is active, editing interviews, putting the callers and guests on the air, playing all of the cuts needed as well as drops or funny sound bites and screw ups by other hosts and guests from previous shows. After the shows are over, I have to produce more cuts for the nights mainly from sporting events like the Warriors games. When I am a producer, I book the guests, make rejoins or mash ups of sound bites with a music bed underneath to come out of breaks with, write teases for the hosts and also update the social media sites throughout the show for the audience to know what is going on.

5.      5.  What is your ultimate goal in sports broadcasting? My ultimate goal in sports broadcasting is to eventually became an on-air host for a station in a mid to major sized market like a Pittsburgh or San Francisco. Getting to this point is hard and doing internships and working at radio stations and TV stations in college is vital.  A more realistic goal for myself is becoming a full-time producer. I truly enjoy the technical side of the radio industry and becoming a producer is something that I have strived to become, and I want to be one of the best around.

6.      6.  In your mind, what is the most significant difference in the way sports are covered today as compared to 20 years ago? This is a great question for several reasons. 20 years ago, sports were not as popular as they are today. There weren’t huge endorsement deals for athletes like there are today, so a lot of athletes get more coverage and the media clamor over the idea of covering a major star in their market. At times, this tends to great fodder for journalists and is becoming a problem. Another way sports’ broadcasting has changed is the way news is made in broadcasting. You have so many scandals, controversies, big contracts etc… that did not happen 20 years ago. 20 years ago the biggest news stories was the Tonya Harding Nancy Kerrigan ordeal and the strike in baseball. One of the major sports stories happen a few years back when Earvin Johnson said that he had aids, this was a major announcement back then. Today, it wouldn’t be as major as an athlete like Michael Sam or Robbie Rogers coming out and proclaiming that they are gay, this is something groundbreaking and wouldn’t have happened 20 years ago. Peoples perceptions of reality have changed when it comes to sports on the difference of what is important and not. 

7.      7.  How has the advancement in technology changed the way sports are broadcast today? Computers and cell phones have changed the way the news is reported, not just sports. Cell phones and computers are great technological advancements, but they are also evil ones as well. I will start with the good. Computers are a great advancement in technology because they let you access any random database and search engine that you could never have access to anywhere. The Internet is like a Dewey decimal system at a library, just far superior in every way. The internet is important because you can retrieve information that you may have missed from newscasts earlier in the day or sporting events you may have missed before as well. This is a great way of catching up, but this is also hurting the professionals who are doing the work as well. Ratings are vital in TV, Radio and newspaper. Newspaper is dying because of the Internet, social media and cell phones. Journalists who write for newspapers might not be inept to doing blogs and twitter posts, so by using a computer or cell phone to get news, the old school journalists are not doing as well because they are not getting the ratings the same way. There will always be new technology in the media; it all comes down to how they are integrated into use that is important.

8.      8.  Do you think social media sites like Twitter have affected the way journalists and reporters cover sports? The biggest change in the broadcasting industry has to be social media. Twitter is the biggest source for news. I use Twitter for everything, I rarely watch TV or read a newspaper because what is being reported on the TV or in your local newspaper happened 2 hours ago or 2 days ago depending on your medium. A story like Earvin Johnson revealing he had AIDS would have been old news on Twitter when it eventually got reported on the news. The internet has changed the way news is being reported in good and bad ways, it all comes down to the ways you use them and what you believe is the truth or not. Social media has brought a revolutionary change to the way we view the broadcasting industry, but the bigger should be is it helping or hurting the broadcasting industry.

9.         9. In what ways do you think podcasts have benefitted the coverage of sports? Podcasts are a new technology that I thoroughly enjoy. This is good for sports junkies like myself who cannot always watch or listen to the sports shows live. For example, when we have interviews on our station, I edit them and then place them on our radio station at 957the Game.com. This gives our listeners a chance to listen to the interviews for the first time or for the 15th time. Podcasts are also important for newer members of the media as well. This gives someone who has little to no experience working on-air the opportunity to begin practicing their format, speed, topics and overall feel for how a real radio show or television show will be. Personally, I do a podcast as much as I can to work on my flaws, like talking very fast to help myself improve to better myself for my career. I strongly urge everyone to listen to a podcast or start doing a podcast. The podcast can be on anything; news, weather, sports, politics, school, family, religion, cars, shopping etc… podcasting is a new technology that is helping aspiring broadcasting hone their craft and become not good but great at what they do. It also teaches the individuals who are not savvy on the production side of the media how to edit the shows they do and what mistakes to look for each time.

10.       . Do you see the media coverage of sports continuing to change as technology advances? In my honest, unbiased opinion yes. Everything changes; change is necessary in a facet of life. On a day-to-day basis, people and their ways of life change dramatically, even if they do not want them too. The same can be said with the sports media field. The way sports is covered will continue to change with the growing popularity of the sports like Basketball, which is becoming increasing popular in overseas markets like China more and more each day. The demand in coverage for basketball is increasing, the same can be said about the NFL as the market and entity that is the NFL continues to grow exponentially each minute. Sports will always be a hot topic no matter what happens. Something interesting will occur, and print media, TV and radio will cover it. That is one of the most wonderful things about working in the sports broadcasting industry is there is always news and a new talking point to discuss. If you are in a large market like I am, something always happens with the Raiders, 49ers, Warriors, Giants, Athletics, Sharks, Earthquakes, Cal, Stanford. Technology will continue to change as the calendars change and years go bye, but the coverage sports get will only increase with the new technology, its just a matter of who can endure and survive the constant changes that will occur. 1

Sean O'Donnell's insight:

4.   Twitter is making other sources of sporting news outdated.  News can be found on Twitter or somewhere else on the internet 2 or 3 hours before it is reported on the news.  Social media has changed the way sports are covered but in some ways that can be a bad development with reporters always trying to be the first to report something.

 

5.  Podcasts are always there for someone who has missed a live edition of an interview, segment, etc.. They are also ideal for someone who wants to go back and listen to a piece again and again.  Its almost like a DVR for radio.

 

6.  Podcasts are also a good tool for aspiring sportscasters.  It gives them a tool to work on flaws that they may have in their work.  By using podcasts, these people can perfect their craft in an environment that closely resembles a radio broadcast setting.

 

 

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Rules of the game change as sports journalists compete against teams they cover | Poynter.

Create. Inform. Engage. | Journalism training, media news & how to's
Sean O'Donnell's insight:

10. "As far back as the mid-1990s, any self-respecting member of the digerati would tell you that digital tools allowed anybody to be a publisher – everybody now had a printing press and a distribution network in their personal computer. Newspapers, magazines and publishing houses were no longer gatekeepers between authors and a world-wide audience."

 

More of this article is usable as well

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9 Breaking News Tweets That Changed Twitter Forever

9 Breaking News Tweets That Changed Twitter Forever | Twitter in Sports and Podcasts in Sports | Scoop.it
Twitter has revolutionized global news delivery and consumption. These nine major news stories broke on Twitter and changed how we use the platform.
Sean O'Donnell's insight:

9. "Twitter has revolutionized global news delivery and consumption... Twitter often breaks news before mainstream media can report it."

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Why Do Sports Reporters Give Away Their Scoops On Twitter?

Why Do Sports Reporters Give Away Their Scoops On Twitter? | Twitter in Sports and Podcasts in Sports | Scoop.it
Do the publishers who pay these writers not care that they're giving away ad impressions in favor of building up their personal brands?
Sean O'Donnell's insight:

6. "Instead of posting their latest nuggets on their publishers' web sites, reporters from advertising-supported outlets like ESPN.com and Yahoo keep giving away their scoops on Twitter."

 

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5 Things I Love About Podcasting

5 Things I Love About Podcasting | Twitter in Sports and Podcasts in Sports | Scoop.it
My post about podcasting earlier this week attracted a lot of insightful comments. There were also a few insulting comments, but overall the feedback showcased what makes podcasts worth consuming: passionate voices. Not coincidentally, passion is also what makes blogs a vital part of the media world. So the point of my article wasn't to disparage…
Sean O'Donnell's insight:

4.  The best podcasts are the ones about niche topics.  Luckily there are podcasts out there that are discuss almost anything in the world.  So anyone can listen to almost any topic.

 

5.  Podcasts being available in cars give people the feeling of being productive while driving.  Its along the same line of thinking as audiobooks, whereas when someone can accomplish a task in the car as they would in their home. 

 

6.  Podcasts can be influential.  Its a tool where people can get their name out along with their ideas.  Someone like Mignon Fogarty is a person who started out doing their own podcasts who now has a New York Times best selling book out.  Its a starting point for people who want to launch their careers in certain fields.

 

7.  Podcasts can augment other media.  What is meant by this is a situation where there is a certain podcast that complements a TV show, book, movie, etc... Where as people might only get 1 hour of their favorite show per week, they can get more analysis with a show-specific podcast whenever they want.

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Social Media Marketing Trends for 2014 from @mike_stelzner #SMMW14

Social Media Marketing Trends for 2014 from @mike_stelzner #SMMW14 | Twitter in Sports and Podcasts in Sports | Scoop.it
Learn about the trends impacting social media in 2014 that businesses and marketers need to know to get the most from social media marketing.
Sean O'Donnell's insight:

1.  Most podcast listeners are fanatics of the intended topic.  In terms of the sports world, this lends itself to people being highly interested in the many aspects of sports.  People are able to get connected to any corner of the sports world through sports podcasts.

 

2. Podcasts are unique in the sense that they are accessible where most media isn't; the car.  Most other media is not available in a car but podcasts are able to be accessible from anywhere inside a vehicle.

 

3.  Michael Stazner, conference organizer at the Social Media Marketing World Conference, predicts all vehicles will all have accessibility to podcasts in the near future.  This presents an opportunity for all businesses to get into the podcasting world so they can expand their business.

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DeAngelo Hall and Richard Sherman get into twitter war

DeAngelo Hall and Richard Sherman get into twitter war | Twitter in Sports and Podcasts in Sports | Scoop.it
If social media has proven anything to us, it’s that NFL defensive backs are most certainly among the biggest trash talkers in the world, and on twitter Thursday night, Washington Redskins defensive back DeAngelo Hall proved that as he went right after Seattle Seahawks corner Richard Sherman, the NFL’s current, most famous loud mouth. Here’s […]
Sean O'Donnell's insight:

7. Actions on Twitter are now becoming main stories in the sports world

8. The interaction between athletes is magnified by Twitter and other social media

 

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All Sports News Will Now Be Broken On Twitter

All Sports News Will Now Be Broken On Twitter | Twitter in Sports and Podcasts in Sports | Scoop.it
If you're not on it, you better get there.
Sean O'Donnell's insight:

1.  The best way to track breaking news in the sports world, is through social media sites like Twitter/Facebook

2.  Most sports writers have Twitters to break their news.  It's revolutionizing sports journalism by having instant news.

3. Athletes can communicate directly with fans through Twitter

4. "A lot of sports people have different conceptions of journalistic "codes" and are less likely to honor things like embargoes or exclusives."

5. Sports teams constrain reporters trying to make it an equal playing field for reporters, but the same reporters file their stories to Twitter knowing it gives them the quickest edge on other reporters. 
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