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How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
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#january25 One Year Later: Social Media & Politics 3.0 by Rory O'Connor

#january25 One Year Later: Social Media & Politics 3.0 by Rory O'Connor | Twit4D | Scoop.it

One year ago, a revolution began in Egypt that still reverberates there -- as well as among other repressive rulers and regimes in Syria, Bahrain, Yemen, Saudi Arabia and beyond, including thousands of miles away in New York City, where "Occupy Wall Street" protests in turn took root and then flowered into literally hundreds of similar protests all around the nation and the world. From Tunis to Tahrir Square -- but also from London, Madrid and Rome to Athens, Tel Aviv and Tokyo -- millions were on the march, demanding more respect, hope, dignity and democracy.

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Révolutions 2.0 ou aubaine marketing? by Myrtille Delamarche

Révolutions 2.0 ou aubaine marketing? by Myrtille Delamarche | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Les printemps sont passés, et avec eux les banderoles et graffitis «Merci Facebook», «merci Twitter». Il est temps d’interroger le rôle réel des réseaux dans les mouvements sociaux.

 Sur la page Facebook de Transterra Media, une plate-forme participative de vente de contenus journalistiques à destination des professionnels, on apprend que la société a été «fondée en 2011 pendant le printemps arabe». Avec ses bureaux à New York, Beyrouth et Le Caire, la plate-forme propose d’ailleurs de nombreuses images des protestations en Égypte. Pourtant, dans un article du magazine économique libanais le Commerce du Levant, on apprend que «L’idée du projet revient à deux Américains, Jonathan Giesen et Eli Andrews. Alors qu’ils habitaient au Caire tous les deux en 2006.»

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Social Media and the Arab Spring Zeynep Tufekci ITW by Marco Werman

Social Media and the Arab Spring  Zeynep Tufekci ITW by Marco Werman | Twit4D | Scoop.it
On December 17, 2010, a young unemployed man set himself on fire in Tunisia.

Mohammed Bouazizi took that desperate step in protest, after officials had blocked his attempts to make a living selling fruit on the street.

His self-immolation sparked a wave of anti-government protests, first in Tunisia, then all across the Middle East.

And technology and social media have played key roles in many of the pro-democracy movements of the Arab Spring. Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Zeynep Tufekci, a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

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The Role of New Media and Communication Technologies in Arab Transitions By Manuel Manrique & Barah Mikaïl

The Role of New Media and Communication Technologies in Arab Transitions By Manuel Manrique & Barah Mikaïl | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Information and Communication Technologies were an important catalyst of the Arab spring. They helped to bring down the Mubarak and Ben Ali regimes by mobilising important parts of the population and creating alternative discourses to authoritarian regimes, which found international backing. However, experiences from other parts of the world suggest that their role in sustaining the transition process in the longer run is less certain. ICTs can nonetheless support democratic consolidation by fostering an open public sphere and helping pro-democracy actors to remain engaged.

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Des bloggeurs arabes témoignent à Bruxelles : « Ce ne sont pas les médias sociaux qui ont fait la révolution, mais l’engagement réel des citoyens » by Alfred Mignot

Des bloggeurs arabes témoignent à Bruxelles : « Ce ne sont pas les médias sociaux qui ont fait la révolution, mais l’engagement réel des citoyens » by Alfred Mignot | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Organisée à l’initiative de Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou, vice-Présidente du Parlement européen et responsable pour la politique d’information et de communication, et des relations EuroMed, une rencontre a rassemblé à Bruxelles, les 29 et 30 novembre 2011, quelque 110 journalistes et bloggeurs des deux rives de la Méditerranée. L’une des conférences était consacrée au rôle des médias sociaux dans les Printemps arabes. Voici l’essentiel des témoignages des bloggeurs sud-méditerranéens…

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Arab Democracy & Social Media by Ethan Zuckerman

Ethan Zuckerman uses data to shine a light on the affronts of censorship. A passionate advocate for free speech in the developing world, Zuckerman is director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT. Current projects include the study of tools for censorship circumvention and the Media Cloud framework for the quantitative study of digital media. Zuckerman is the founder of Geekcorps, a technology volunteer corps, and cofounder of Global Voices Online, an ever-growing network of international citizen-bloggers. Zuckerman will give insight into the interplay of established and social media and their relationship to shifting power structures.

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Do “Liberation Technologies” Change the Balance of Power Between Repressive Regimes and Civil Society? By Patrick Meier

Do “Liberation Technologies” Change the Balance of Power Between Repressive Regimes and Civil Society? By Patrick Meier | Twit4D | Scoop.it

o new information and communication technologies (ICTs) empower repressive regimes at the expense of civil society, or vice versa? For example, does access to the Internet and mobile phones alter the balance of power between repressive regimes and civil society? These questions are especially pertinent today given the role that ICTs played during this year’s uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and beyond. Indeed, as one Egyptian activist stated, “We use Facebook to schedule our protests, Twitter to coordinate and YouTube to tell the world.” But do these new ICTs—so called “liberation technologies”—really threaten repressive rule? The purpose of this dissertation is to use mixed-methods research to answer these questions.

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Andy Carvin on Social Media Revolutions by Anthony Rotolo

Andy Carvin on Social Media Revolutions by Anthony Rotolo | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Andy Carvin (@acarvin), NPR Senior Strategist, spoke to students studying social media at the Syracuse University School of Information Studies on September 15, 2011. Carvin is known for using Twitter to report and curate information on the Arab Spring revolutions in Tunisia, Egypt, Lybia and across. He has been credited with helping to reshape the role of journalism, particularly citizen journalism, in the age of social media.

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The Revolutions Were Tweeted by Gilad Lotan & others

The Revolutions Were Tweeted by Gilad Lotan & others | Twit4D | Scoop.it

This paper details the networked production and dissemination of news on Twitter during snapshots of the 2011 Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions as seen through information flows—sets of near-duplicate tweets—across activists, bloggers, journalists, mainstream media outlets, and other engaged participants. We differentiate between these user types and analyze patterns of sourcing and routing information among them. We describe the symbiotic relationship between media outlets and individuals and the distinct roles particular user types appear to play. Using this analysis, we discuss how Twitter plays a key role in amplifying and spreading timely information across the globe.

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The Middle Ground between Technology and Revolutions by Aaron Bady

The Middle Ground between Technology and Revolutions by Aaron Bady | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Social media didn't cause the revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia, but it did achieve unique visibility.

Is there still a debate on whether social media can cause revolutions? If this was ever a serious question, it was mainly an argument between straw men: on the one hand, wild idealists who saw the internet as an all-encompassing force for freedom and on the other, the crusty curmudgeons who fear technology and pooh-pooh the idea that social media is good for anything but posting pictures of cats. 

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Access Live Stream Symposium: the Middle East, the Revolution and the Internet

On Thursday, February 3rd, 2011 at 12:00 PM EST (GMT-5) Access hosted a live streamed online symposium entitled: The Middle East, the Revolution, and the Int...
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Nasser Wedaddy: Twitter et facebook sont la révolution et la contre révolution

Nasser Wedaddy: Twitter et facebook sont la révolution et la contre révolution | Twit4D | Scoop.it

«Facebook et twitter n’ont pas été la raison derrière les révolutions dans le monde arabe. Ils ont juste permis de porter la voix du citoyens au monde», affirme M. Nasser wedaddy (@wedaddy sur twitter), un cyber activiste mauritanien très connu dans le monde arabe. C’était dans le cadre de l’Arab Bloggers Meeting qui s’est déroulé le 3 septembre dernier à la cité des sciences.

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re:campaign XI: How Social Media Helped Spark the Arab Spring by Jillian C. York

re:campaign XI: How Social Media Helped Spark the Arab Spring by Jillian C. York | Twit4D | Scoop.it
On Saturday, I gave another talk in Berlin, this time at the re:campaign conference, on the role of technology in the uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, and beyond. My take, as I’m sure you know by now, is that tools are just that…tools, and that a revolution comes from human power, but that nevertheless, such technology has become integrated into our lives (and lives of Egyptians, Tunisians, etc) to the point where it’s only natural that we would turn to them in the case of social movements and protest.
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La révolution arabe, fille de l'Internet ? by Marie Bénilde

La révolution arabe, fille de l'Internet ? by Marie Bénilde | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Quel rôle ont joué les nouveaux médias dans la chute des régimes autocratiques de Tunisie et d’Egypte ? Faut-il prêter à Facebook, et aux réseaux sociaux en général, la capacité de mobiliser des foules et de susciter des mouvements d’opposition ? Enseignements politico-médiatiques de révoltes puis de révolutions « en ligne ».

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Arab World: Global Voices Bridges on Twitter by Gilad Lotan

Arab World: Global Voices Bridges on Twitter by Gilad Lotan | Twit4D | Scoop.it
This past year has been eventful to say the least in our merry little Middle East and North Africa region. As a part of our end-of-year coverage we look back at some of the major events we covered during 2011. The following post highlights the role of the Global Voices Online community in spreading information on Twitter during the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions.

The data that feeds this visualization is taken from “The Revolutions were Tweeted“, an International Journal of Communication article mapping out prominent information flows during the Egyptian and Tunisian revolutions. The study uses two datasets of tweets. The first includes 168,663 tweets posted between January 12 and 19, 2011, containing the keyword ‘#sidibouzid' or ‘tunisia'. The second includes 230,270 tweets posted between January 24 and 29, 2011, containing the keyword ‘egypt' or ‘#jan25′.

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Ethan Zuckerman, Chair of Global Voices on the impact of social media on Africa

Global Voices is a network of bloggers and has amongst it membership a number who were involved in the Arab Spring. In this video, Ethan Zuckerman talks about: why he and colleague set up Global Voices; the speed of coverage of the Arab Spring, particularly Tunisia; the strength and influence of Sub-Saharan African bloggers; the student protests in Gabon; and the ways in which rulers are now aware of the power of social media.

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Blogueurs et journalistes rejouent les printemps arabes à Bruxelles

Blogueurs et journalistes rejouent les printemps arabes à Bruxelles | Twit4D | Scoop.it
MÉDITERRANÉE. Ce pourrait être un peu l'histoire de la poule et de l’œuf ! Les blogueurs et autres internautes sont-ils à à l'origine des Printemps arabes ou les révolutions ont-elles favorisé l'éclosion des médias sociaux ?
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Média citoyen, relais d’engagements associatifs et outil de démocratie participative by Bruno Marzloff

Média citoyen, relais d’engagements associatifs et outil de démocratie participative by Bruno Marzloff | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Ce n’est pas le numérique qui favorise la révolution, c’est l’envie de révolution qui a suscité le numérique pour s’accomplir. Le numérique est la signature de l’autonomie et de la rupture. Le moteur est le même qui agite les foules en Tunisie et qui transforme le quotidien des gens à Paris, même si les plans ne sont pas les mêmes.

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The Arab revolution: “We have a lot to learn from them” Jean-Pierre Filiu ITW

What are the main social dynamics of the waves of revolt in the Arab world in 2011? Jean-Pierre Filiu, scholar and author of "The Arab Revolution: Ten Lessons from the Democratic Uprising", discusses the question with Paul Hockenos.
Paul Hockenos: The social media played a key role across the Arab world in the upheavals of 2011, a theme you elaborate upon in your book The Arab Revolution. Why, then, do you caution not to exaggerate their importance?

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Social media, tipping points and revolutions by Mathew Ingram

Social media, tipping points and revolutions by Mathew Ingram | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The issue of whether — or how much — social-media tools such as Facebook and Twitter influenced the “Arab Spring” revolutions in Egypt and elsewhere has been a contentious one since the first rock was thrown in Tunisia earlier this year. But as more experts have studied the events in those countries, it has become increasingly clear that social tools and networks played a fairly critical role in helping turn what had been undercurrents of dissent into open revolt.
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De la Toile à la Constituante : sept candidats blogueurs tunisiens by Hélène Sallon

De la Toile à la Constituante : sept candidats blogueurs tunisiens by Hélène Sallon | Twit4D | Scoop.it

"Je ne suis pas qu'un blogueur ! [...] Je suis un jeune Tunisien, qui pense qu'il a des choses intéressantes à dire et à faire, et qui veut participer à la construction d'une meilleure Tunisie", lance le 13 septembre Yassine Ayari sur son blog Mel7it. Fers de lance de la révolution tunisienne, les blogueurs et autres facebookers entendent bien ne pas se voir cantonner à ce rôle virtuel. Et revendiquent pleinement leur rôle de citoyen. Yassine Ayari et six autres blogueurs célèbres ont décidé de s'atteler à la dure tâche d'écrire la future Constitution du pays en se présentant aux élections du 23 octobre pour l'Assemblée constituante.

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Social Media & the Arab Spring: First Looks By Melissa Wall

Social Media & the Arab Spring: First Looks By Melissa Wall | Twit4D | Scoop.it

16 new research articles about the roles of social media and the Arab Spring have been published in the International Journal of Communication. All of the articles can be viewed for free online and are listed below.

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Ethan Zuckerman talking about Tunisian cyberactivism

Ethan Zuckerman (Berkman Center for Internet & Society, Harvard Law School) talking about Tunisian cyberactivism during the conference "International News an...
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Zeynep Tufekci: Social Media Tools of Dissent

A debate has been raging about what role social media played in Tunisia and now in Egypt. Some claim sites like Facebook and Twitter were a catalyst for the ...
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Arabloggers 2011: Tunisian Voices by Jillian C. York

Arabloggers 2011: Tunisian Voices by Jillian C. York | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Transcription o 3rd arab Bloggers (#AB11) conf day1. Tunisian bloggers & Politics, featuring Riadh Guerfali (@Astrubaal), Amira Yahyaoui (@mira404), Tarek Kahlaoui, Mehdi Lamloum (@MehdiLamloum) and Slim Amamou (@Slim404), moderated by Malek Khadraoui. The panelists spoke in French and Arabic, so all quotes below are an approximation.

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