Twit4D
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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Revolution, Women And Social Media in The Middle East

Revolution, Women And Social Media in The Middle East | Twit4D | Scoop.it
"The power of women is in their stories. They are not theories, they are real lives that, thanks to social networks, we are able to share and exchange," said Egyptian-American activist Mona el-Tahawey, kicking off a summit that brought more than a hundred of the Middle East's leading female activists together in Cairo.

With her arms still bandaged from the assault she suffered at the hands of Egypt's ruling military power last November, Tahawey was greeted like a celebrity by cyberactivists who only knew her from Twitter as she kicked off the Yahoo! Change Your World Cairo summit Wednesday.

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Arab Spring Activists Sit Down With Silicon Valley Suits by Taylor Wiles

Arab Spring Activists Sit Down With Silicon Valley Suits by Taylor Wiles | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Last week, tech executives and Internet activists swarmed San Francisco for the first ever Silicon Valley Human Rights Conference. The two-day event focused on the increasingly complex relationship between the Internet and human rights. Access, an advocacy organization for Internet rights, hosted the conference, and drew representatives from influential players in Silicon Valley and activists arriving from revolution or government oppression in places like Egypt, Syria, Uganda, and Thailand.

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Twitter Trolling as Propaganda Tactic: Bahrain and Syria by Jillian C. York

Twitter Trolling as Propaganda Tactic: Bahrain and Syria by Jillian C. York | Twit4D | Scoop.it

I’ve spent the past few months documenting the tactics of the Syrian Electronic Army and other factions in respect to spreading propaganda to counter anti-opposition sentiment (you can find my writing on the SEA here, here, and here; and an interview with NPR here). I’ve mainly focused on the utility of hacktivism in awareness-raising, with some emphasis on the effectiveness of flooding the dominant media narrative for the purpose of gaining attention for the other side (in this case, the pro-regime side), but what I haven’t touched on is the longer-term effect these tactics are having on people both in-country and outside, as well as where this type of activity fits in the broader landscape of online activism in the region.

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Syrian Electronic Army: Disruptive Attacks and Hyped Targets

Syrian Electronic Army: Disruptive Attacks and Hyped Targets | Twit4D | Scoop.it

In The Emergence of Open and Organized Pro-Government Cyber Attacks in the Middle East: The Case of the Syrian Electronic Army, the Information Warfare Monitor’s Helmi Noman started documenting the activities of the Syrian Electronic Army (SEA), which appears to be a case of an open and organized pro-government computer attack group that is actively targeting political opposition and Western websites. That report documented how Syria has become the first Arab country to have a public Internet Army hosted on its national networks to openly launch cyber attacks on its enemies.

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Syria's spontaneously organised protests By Kim Ghattas

Syria's spontaneously organised protests By Kim Ghattas | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Who are the organisers of the Syrian protests and how do they keep the movement going? The BBC's Kim Ghattas reports.
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Spam Bots Flooding Twitter to Drown Info About #Syria Protests by Anas Qtiesh

Spam Bots Flooding Twitter to Drown Info About #Syria Protests by Anas Qtiesh | Twit4D | Scoop.it
People following the #Syria hash tag on Twitter in the recent weeks to track the developments of the Syrian protests and the deadly governmental crackdown on peaceful protesters must have noticed two major annoyances:
First was the proliferation of what tweeps dubbed as the “twitter eggs,” a group of newly created and mostly image-less twitter accounts that cussed out, verbally assaulted, and threatened anyone tweeting favorably about the ongoing protests, or criticizing the regime.
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On Facebook and Twitter, spreading revolution in Syria by Nicholas Blanford

On Facebook and Twitter, spreading revolution in Syria by Nicholas Blanford | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Social networks are playing a central role in fueling protests in Syria, where demonstrations Friday were the largest since anti-Assad activists took to the street last month.
Five years ago, Malath Aumran was a normal young Syrian man with little interest in politics and, like millions of his fellow countrymen, a passive supporter of the regime of President Bashar al-Assad.
But a brutal act of violence set him on a path of political activism that today has turned him into an exile hiding in Beirut. Now, surrounded by laptop computers and Internet cables, the young, technologically savvy activist is using social networking tools to help build and sustain the popular uprising that has convulsed Syria and shaken the regime in the past three weeks.
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The Revolution Will Be Blogged, @LeShaque ITWed by Angie Nassar

The Revolution Will Be Blogged, @LeShaque ITWed by Angie Nassar | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Shakeeb al-Jabri, 30, known as @LeShaque on Twitter, is a prominent Syrian blogger based in Beirut. He admittedly spends less than “two hours of his waking life away from social media,” as he works around the clock to fight the information war happening amidst the Syrian uprising to overthrow President Bashar al-Assad.

NOW Lebanon sat down with the blogger to find out more about his role in the revolution.

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BrianLehrer.tv: Crowdsourcing Atrocities in Syria

Non-profit tech company Ushahidi uses crowdsourcing and satellite maps to document government atrocities in Syria. Their director of crisis mapping, Patrick Meier, explains. Then Jillian York of the Electronic Frontier Foundation looks at how hackers in Syria are working for and against the regime.

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Syria's electronic army - Al Jazeera English by Jilian C. York

Syria's electronic army - Al Jazeera English by Jilian C. York | Twit4D | Scoop.it

While the battles between the opposition and the Syrian regime are waged on the ground, a different battle is emerging online.

In the midst of a virtual blackout on the city of Hama, citizen videos - often shaky and unverifiable - document the brutality of the Syrian military's crackdown on the city, ongoing since July 31 - the day before the start of Ramadan - while online campaigns, hosted on Facebook and Twitter, aim to draw attention to events on the ground. The narrative: Syrians are suffering and want the world to take notice.

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Theorizing Ushahidi: An Academic Treatise

Theorizing Ushahidi: An Academic Treatise | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Activists are not only turning to social media to document unfolding events, they are increasingly mapping these events for the world to bear witness. We’ve seen this happen in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Syria, Yemen and beyond. My colleague Alexey Sidorenko describes this new phenomenon as a “mapping reflex.”

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Syria's Twitter spambots by Jillian C York

Syria's Twitter spambots by Jillian C York | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Jillian C York: Twitter isn't always a tool for protest – in Syria pro-regime accounts have been set up to flood the pro-revolution narrative...
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Twitter Not Popular Among Syrian Cyber-Activists : The Damascus Bureau

Twitter Not Popular Among Syrian Cyber-Activists : The Damascus Bureau | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The social networking service Twitter has so far failed to attract large numbers of Syrian Internet users as it did in other Arab countries. In an interview conducted via email, a Syrian blogger and activist said that the Syrian online community has not yet realised Twitter’s potential as a tool that could help them publicise their causes.
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Twitter Musings in Syria Elicit Groans in Washington - NYTimes.com

Twitter Musings in Syria Elicit Groans in Washington - NYTimes.com | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Two young State Department employees in Syria embarrassed the department with a series of breezy Twitter posts, highlighting the risks of using social media as a tool for diplomacy.
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