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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Activists get connected by Julia Ioffe

Activists get connected by Julia Ioffe | Twit4D | Scoop.it

“The Soviet Union still exists in Russia because people are still repeating old patterns,” Shkumatov explains. “As soon as someone joins an organisation, he wants to become the general secretary of the Communist party.”
In the past few days, the Russian blogosphere has proved to be a powerful tool in organising such sentiments. A day after disputed election results delivered both a victory and a defeat to the ruling, vaguely Soviet, United Russia party – it won a majority of seats in the Russian parliament, but lost 15 per cent compared with the 2007 electio7 – some 6,000 young people took to Moscow’s streets. As in the case of protests seen around the world, from Cairo to Zucotti Park, they had been brought there by Facebook and Twitter. And they were angry about what they had read on the internet, information that rarely makes it into the “official” Russian press.

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Russian Protesters Get Twitter-Bombed : Discovery News by Jesse Emspak

Russian Protesters Get Twitter-Bombed : Discovery News by Jesse Emspak | Twit4D | Scoop.it
As the protests in Russia demanding new parliamentary elections mount, Twitter-based chatter about them is being drowned out by PCs hijacked by hackers, say security experts.

The pro-government messages were generated by thousands of Twitter accounts that had little activity beforehand. The hashtag is #триумфальная (Triumfalnaya), the name of the square where many protesters gathered.

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#ARRESTme2 Campaign Launched in Russia to Rally Support for Democracy Activists by Micah L. Sifry

Russian democracy activist Maria Gaidar has launched a social media campaign in solidarity with the hundreds of people who have been arrested in the wake of post-election protests called ARRESTme2. On her LiveJournal blog, she calls on readers to declare their solidarity with people like blogger Alexei Navalny by tweeting using the #ARRESTme2 hashtag and by joining and spreading a Facebook group with the same goal. She writes (with lousy translation provided by Google Translate):

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Russia furious with EU over Twitter revolution By Shaun Walker

Russia furious with EU over Twitter revolution By Shaun Walker | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The crisis in Moldova, dubbed the "Twitter Revolution", was last night threatening to turn into another showdown between Russia and the West. Just weeks after Barack Obama's government spoke of "pressing the reset button" with Russia, the conflict risks derailing the fragile diplomatic truce.
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Russia’s virtual: the new reality? by Julien Nocetti

Russia’s virtual: the new reality? by Julien Nocetti | Twit4D | Scoop.it

In some ways, the Internet has become a full public sphere where citizens can exchange increasingly critical ideas and implement “citizen” projects. During the Egyptian revolution in 2011, people were using blogs and microblogs such as Twitter to form networks, reassuring them that they were not alone in their views. There are certainly signs that this happening in Russia⎯— the collective action groups that sprung up during 2010 summer wildfires were perhaps the first real example of this; organisation ahead of Saturday’s demonstration would be another one. Networks such as these create a common consciousness of public affairs, eventually leading to the creation of a public voice.

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Russia Twitter protests 'spammed'

Russia Twitter protests 'spammed' | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Hijacked PCs may have helped drown out online chat about Russian election protests, say security experts. The computers were used to disrupt Twitter as Russians chatted about ongoing protests in Moscow's Triumphal Square, said security firm Trend Micro.

Analysis of the many pro-Kremlin messages posted to some discussions suggested they were sent by machines.

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Is Russia ripe for a Twitter revolution? By Natasha Doff

Is Russia ripe for a Twitter revolution? By Natasha Doff | Twit4D | Scoop.it
At 16.32 on January 24 a suicide bomber blew himself up at Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport. The news was first broken on Twitter at 16.44 after which international news sites picked up on the story. Almost two hours later, Russia’s state-run TV channels announced the attack.

“Television is dead,” was the response of many in Russia’s growing army of bloggers. Others mocked Russian President Dmitry Medvedev, a self-proclaimed Twitter-addict, for allegedly learning about the blasts on the micro-blogging site.
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How The 1991 'Usenet Revolution' In Moscow Predates The 'Twitter Revolution' Claims by Mike Masnick

With all the pointless talk about whether or not Twitter/Facebook were somehow instrumental in the Egyptian and Tunisian revolutions, Shocklee points us to an interesting predecessor: the mostly forgotten news of how some geeks in Moscow used Usenet during a 1991 coup attempt to spread news around the world, even as the official media was totally cut off:
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