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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Perspectives on Politics: Critical Dialogue - Dr. Philip N. Howard and Evgeny Morozov by Muzammil Hussain

Perspectives on Politics: Critical Dialogue - Dr. Philip N. Howard and Evgeny Morozov by Muzammil Hussain | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Since the beginning of the year there have been significant changes in North Africa and the Middle East. Zine El Abidine Ben Ali had ruled Tunisia for 20 years, and Hosni Mubarak reigned in Egypt for 30 years. Yet their bravest challengers were 20- and 30-year-olds without ideological baggage, violent intentions, or clear leaders. Political change in these countries inspired activists across the region. Some tough authoritarian governments responded with tear gas and rubber bullets, others with policy concessions, welfare spending, and cabinet shuffles. The groups that initiated and sustained protests had few meaningful experiences with public deliberation or voting, and little experience with successful protesting. These young citizens were politically disciplined, pragmatic, and collaborative. Where did they come from? How do young people growing up in modern, entrenched, authoritarian regimes find political inspirations and aspirations? Are digital media important parts of the contemporary recipe for democratization?

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Predictable Surprises: 10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard

Predictable Surprises:  10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Between now and 2015, there will be some predictable crises in global politics. The most predictable political crises have become the moments in which dictators ask tech-savvy voters to participate in a rigged election. Social media allows people to call out big organized lies, so rigged elections have become sensitive moments in international politics. Since we know these moments are on their way, and both foreign policy makers and journalists act surprised when they arrive, we can call such moments "predictable surprises".

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My review of "The Digital Origins of Dictatorships and Democracy" by Evgeny Morozov

Philip Howard’s important book offers a timely and thorough treatment of a subject that has been catapulted into the global limelight thanks to recent revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt: the impact of the Internet on the political cultures in the Middle East. Howard’s focus is on the relationship between technology diffusion and democratization in countries with significant (i.e., constituting at least 10% of the population) Muslim communities in the period between 1994 and 2010. These 75 countries make for a good analytical set and share more than Islam: They have some of the fastest technology adoption rates in the world, whereas many of their governments try to stymie the political uses of information and communications technology (ICT) while striving to benefit from them economically.

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Opening Closed Regimes: What Was the Role of Social Media During the Arab Spring? by Philip Howard

Opening Closed Regimes: What Was the Role of Social Media During the Arab Spring? by Philip Howard | Twit4D | Scoop.it

After analyzing over 3 million tweets, gigabytes of YouTube content and thousands of blog posts, a new study finds that social media played a central role in shaping political debates in the Arab Spring. Conversations about revolution often preceded major events on the ground, and social media carried inspiring stories of protest across international borders. Download study: http://bit.ly/pwPaET

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