Twit4D
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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Perspectives on Politics: Critical Dialogue - Dr. Philip N. Howard and Evgeny Morozov by Muzammil Hussain

Perspectives on Politics: Critical Dialogue - Dr. Philip N. Howard and Evgeny Morozov by Muzammil Hussain | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Since the beginning of the year there have been significant changes in North Africa and the Middle East. Zine El Abidine Ben Ali had ruled Tunisia for 20 years, and Hosni Mubarak reigned in Egypt for 30 years. Yet their bravest challengers were 20- and 30-year-olds without ideological baggage, violent intentions, or clear leaders. Political change in these countries inspired activists across the region. Some tough authoritarian governments responded with tear gas and rubber bullets, others with policy concessions, welfare spending, and cabinet shuffles. The groups that initiated and sustained protests had few meaningful experiences with public deliberation or voting, and little experience with successful protesting. These young citizens were politically disciplined, pragmatic, and collaborative. Where did they come from? How do young people growing up in modern, entrenched, authoritarian regimes find political inspirations and aspirations? Are digital media important parts of the contemporary recipe for democratization?

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U.S. To Twitter: Stop Sleeping With The Enemy by Daniel Freedman

U.S. To Twitter: Stop Sleeping With The Enemy by Daniel Freedman | Twit4D | Scoop.it

The love affair between Twitter and the U.S. government is in danger of crashing as spectacularly as a celebrity relationship: with tears, disavowals, a chorus of “I told you so”s, and, of course, lawsuits. Like the Demi Moore – Ashton Kutcher (both popular Twitterati) breakup, the reason is alleged infidelity. In Twitter’s case it’s worse than a claimed hot tub fling, however. The online micro-blogging tool is accused of consorting with U.S. enemies: terrorist groups.

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The Internet and Democracy - Evgeny Morozov, Jillian York, Deirdre Mulligan

Are the insurgencies spawned in the Arab Spring riding a wave borne by the internet, or are the new information technologies more likely to subvert those very movements? A discussion featuring Evgeny Morozov, an internet-savvy analyst of social protest and author of The Net Delusion, and Jillian York, who writes and speaks regularly about free expression, politics, and the internet, with a focus on the Arab world. Moderated by Deirdre Mulligan, professor of law at the UC Berkeley School of Information and a faculty director of the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology. Presented by Dissent, ISSI's Center for Research on Social Change, and CITRIS Data and Democracy Initiative

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Evgeny Morozov: A Twitter Revolution without revoluationaries?

Keynote by Evgeny Morozov at re:publica 2010 in Berlin about "A Twitter Revolution without revoluationaries? What we know and what we dont know about the imp...
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Internet sert-il à faire la révolution? by Pierre Haski

Internet sert-il à faire la révolution? by Pierre Haski | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Dans son premier livre, le Biélorusse Evgeny Morozov dénonce les "cyberutopistes" qui croient à une émancipation des peuples par Internet. Un discours auquel ne souscrit pas Pierre Haski, le cofondateur de Rue89.
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Morozov vs.(?) Tufekci at the US Naval Academy by Ethan Zuckerman

The conference is organized primarily by the naval midshipmen and it’s one of the best-run academic conferences I’ve attended. I had the great pleasure of delivering the opening keynote for the conference Tuesday morning – I’ll try to post those notes later this week – and these notes reflect my liveblogging from the audience of a very interesting conversation.
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Facebook and Twitter are just places revolutionaries go by Evgeny Morozov

Facebook and Twitter are just places revolutionaries go by Evgeny Morozov | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Evgeny Morozov: Cyber-utopians who believe the Arab spring has been driven by social networks ignore the real-world activism underpinning them...
Tweets were sent. Dictators were toppled. Internet = democracy. QED. Sadly, this is the level of nuance in most popular accounts of the internet's contribution to the recent unrest in the Middle East.
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The limits of the 'Twitter revolution' by Anne Nelson

The limits of the 'Twitter revolution' by Anne Nelson | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Twitter: a 'constant churn of ideas, jokes, gossip, and discoveries', but only at particular moments a tool for social change. The new digital technologies are powerful tools in moments of crisis, but they cannot substitute for sustained citizen activism
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“Net Delusion” Review: The Authoritarian Trinity Part3 By Mary C Joyce

“Net Delusion” Review: The Authoritarian Trinity Part3 By Mary C Joyce | Twit4D | Scoop.it
About a third of the way through his book The Net Delusion, Evgeny Morozov references the Orwellian “trilogy of authoritarianism”: censorship, propaganda, and surveillance. This is a useful framework for analyzing digital repression, but Morozov only tells half the story.
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When the internet actually helps dictators by John D. Sutter

When the internet actually helps dictators  by John D. Sutter | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The "cyber-utopians" have the global microphone. These tech-will-save-the-world types, according to author Evgeny Morozov, tend to believe the internet can do no wrong. It spawns democracy, as has been shown with the protests rifling across the Middle East and North Africa. And it organizes people in new and fast and always-exciting ways.
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The real challenge for Internet freedom? US hypocrisy. And there's no app for that by Evgeny Morozov


Secretary Clinton's speech on Internet freedom was full of good news. The US has a more grown-up view of the complexities of Internet freedom and its importance. The bad news was in what Clinton didn't address: the role US foreign policy and US companies play in Internet oppression.
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Can Egypt's Internet Movement Be Exported? | The Nation by Ari Melber

Official Washington had no appetite for regime change in Egypt,” notes Evgeny Morozov, a leading skeptic of the power of digital uprisings, “while Silicon Valley managed to contribute to undermining Mubarak.”

As the world has now seen, the resilient protestors who gathered in Cairo were continuously broadcast, and often organized, through social networks built in Palo Alto. Yet Morozov, an author and agitator who has met with democracy activists in Cairo, cautions against downloading the wrong lessons from Egypt, as he recently explained in an interview with The Nation.
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America's Internet Freedom Agenda by Evgeny Morozov

PALO ALTO -- When Hillary Clinton delivered her first major speech on Internet freedom in January 2010 little did she know about WikiLeaks and the yet-to-come revolts in Tunisia and Egypt. Proclaiming Internet freedom to be a new priority for American foreign policy, Clinton provided scant details on how this new idealistic initiative would fit with its existing realpolitik foundations -- the ones that have often prized stability over liberty.
Clinton's follow-up speech, delivered on February 15th at George Washington University, was an effort to capitalize on the universal excitement about the role of social media in the recent events in the Middle East, correct some of the rhetorical excesses of the 2010 address, and try to reconcile the inherent contradictions of aspiring to export Internet freedom abroad while limiting it at home, with National Security Agency and Department of Homeland Security seeking more oversight over cyberspace.
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My review of "The Digital Origins of Dictatorships and Democracy" by Evgeny Morozov

Philip Howard’s important book offers a timely and thorough treatment of a subject that has been catapulted into the global limelight thanks to recent revolutions in Tunisia and Egypt: the impact of the Internet on the political cultures in the Middle East. Howard’s focus is on the relationship between technology diffusion and democratization in countries with significant (i.e., constituting at least 10% of the population) Muslim communities in the period between 1994 and 2010. These 75 countries make for a good analytical set and share more than Islam: They have some of the fastest technology adoption rates in the world, whereas many of their governments try to stymie the political uses of information and communications technology (ICT) while striving to benefit from them economically.

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The internet is the best place for dissent to start by Cory Doctorow

The internet is the best place for dissent to start by Cory Doctorow | Twit4D | Scoop.it
It's been a year since I reviewed The Net Delusion, Evgeny Morozov's skeptical take on the internet's role in global justice struggles.

Central to Morozov's critique was the undeniable fact that Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and other social media tools are monumentally unsuited to use in hostile revolutionary settings, because while they may get the word out about forthcoming demonstrations and the outrages that provoke them, they also expose their users to retribution from oppressive governments.

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The End of Cyber Utopia by Evgeny Morozov

Smartphones and social media seem to be the new weapons used to topple both dictators and old power structures. The euphoria over the Internet and its revolutionary role seems endless. One man, Evgeny Morozov states that this is nothing more than a mirage. He takes Backlight into his battle against cyber utopianism.

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Morozov: Twitter Was Not Magic Key to Egypt's Revolution - on Dailymotion

Morozov: Twitter Was Not Magic Key to Egypt's Revolution Open Society Foundations - Open Society Foundations Open Society Foundations Fellow Evgeny Morozov on his book The Net Delusion.
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The Net Delusion: How Not to Liberate the World by Evgeny Morozov – review by Tom Chatfield

The Net Delusion: How Not to Liberate the World by Evgeny Morozov – review by Tom Chatfield | Twit4D | Scoop.it
On 21 January 2010, US secretary of state Hillary Clinton made a speech at the delightfully named Newseum – America's leading "interactive museum of news" – announcing "internet freedom" as a core foreign policy concern. "Information freedom," she argued, "supports the peace and security that provide a foundation for global progress." Evgeny Morozov has a blunt riposte to such ambitions: they smack of "excessive optimism and empty McKinsey-speak," not to mention a "creative use of recent history".
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Will the Revolution be Tweeted? Power and Money Still Rule the World

Will the Revolution be Tweeted? Power and Money Still Rule the World | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Evgeny Morozov, author of “The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom,” spoke to a large crowd in Kane Hall at the University of Washington Tuesday night with his twist on a topic that generally accepted by digital missionaries: Does Internet access and social media spread democracy? Morozov says not necessarily. While the digital evangelists sing their gospel about how the Internet and social media will help spread democracy into the dark and oppressed corners of the world, Morozov detailed how the Internet, technology and social media can be used by authoritarian governments to quash revolts and maintain their control.
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Did the Intertubes Topple Hosni? | Zócalo Public Square

Did the Intertubes Topple Hosni? | Zócalo Public Square | Twit4D | Scoop.it
During the protests in Iran in 2009, Internet idealists saw the possibility for peaceful, Twitter-based regime change in oppressive societies. But Evgeny Morozov argues in his book, The Net Delusion, that the reality is that social media can be used to oppress as well as rebel. In advance of Morozov’s appearance at Zócalo on February 16th, we asked scholars in the field whether what happened recently in Tunisia and Egypt was thanks to the Internet or in spite of it.
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“Net Delusion” Review: Debunking Digital Activism Part4 By Mary C Joyce

“Net Delusion” Review: Debunking Digital Activism Part4 By Mary C Joyce | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Warning: this will be one of my more critical reviews of The Net Delusion. The reason is simple: in the chapter I’ll be addressing in this post Morozov attempts to debunk the value of digital activism. This is a false premise and easily refuted. I’ll do so vigorously. Let’s begin.
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“Net Delusion” Review: Back to the Cold War Part2 By Mary C Joyce

“Net Delusion” Review: Back to the Cold War Part2 By Mary C Joyce | Twit4D | Scoop.it
In this second post on The Net Delusion I’m going to look at two chapters together. This is not only because there are eleven chapters in the book and I need to double-up sometimes, but also because Morozov himself sets up an amazing thematic juxtaposition: In chapter two he successfully shreds the idea that the Cold War is an effective metaphor for the current Internet freedom debate, and then he begins chapter three by using an extended Cold War anecdote to make arguments about Internet freedom.
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Wallflowers at the Revolution by Frank Rich

Wallflowers at the Revolution by Frank Rich | Twit4D | Scoop.it
A month ago most Americans could not have picked Hosni Mubarak out of a police lineup. American foreign policy, even in Afghanistan, was all but invisible throughout the 2010 election season. Foreign aid is the only federal budget line that a clear-cut majority of Americans says should be cut.
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Evgeny Morozov @lacantine

Evgeny Morosov, l'auteur de The Net Delusion : The Dark Side of Internet Freedom était l'invité de Silicon Sentier et d'Owni à La Cantine, vendredi 21 janvier 2011...
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Digital and social activism: no small change by Timi Stoop-Alcala

Digital and social activism: no small change by Timi Stoop-Alcala | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The social upheaval that exploded in Tunisia and Egypt is spreading across the Arab World. At the time of this writing, dissent is snowballing in Libya, Bahrain and Iran.

In the wake of these extraordinary events, a myriad of discussions on the role the Internet and the social web has emerged. Cyber-utopians are praising Twitter and Facebook to the heavens; cyber-sceptics are pooh-poohing the contribution of social networks in spawning social change.
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