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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Central Asia: An Exception to the “Cute Cats” Theory of Internet Revolution by Sarah Kendzior

Zuckerman’s theory is a refreshing alternative to the common caricature of internet users in authoritarian states as revolutionaries in waiting. But it suffers from a fallacy that plagues much of internet scholarship: studies of the effectiveness of the internet in fomenting revolution are usually limited to where the internet was effective, because those successes, by definition, are the ones we know. The “failures” – the many countries where the circulation of evidence of state crimes through social media prompts no change in state practices, and in some cases, dissuades citizens from joining activist causes – tend to go unmentioned. They are, I suspect, more the norm than the exception, and they have proven the rule in former Soviet authoritarian states.
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What does the Kyrgyz revolution say about social-media engagement? By Jesse Stanchak

What does the Kyrgyz revolution say about social-media engagement? By Jesse Stanchak | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Does a Twitter topic need to trend to have an impact? Is a topic less important if it has a deep resonance for a smaller group of people — instead of the other way around? If those seem like silly questions to you, think about the way the role of social media in the Kyrgyz revolution is being portrayed by many media outlets.
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Expanding Twitter’s Reach in Kyrgyzstan by Marat Djanbaev

Expanding Twitter’s Reach in Kyrgyzstan by Marat Djanbaev | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Following last year's uprising in Kyrgyzstan, local NGO leaders were committed to finding a way to expand Twitter's reach by making it more accessible and affordable. Tweet.kg was born.
In the lead up to last year’s revolution in Kyrgyzstan, the state of press freedom in the country could only be characterized as dismal: reporters suffered violent attacks, newspapers were suspended, broadcasters were pressured to drop critical programming, and access to online news websites were blocked.
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