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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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The Role of New Media and Communication Technologies in Arab Transitions By Manuel Manrique & Barah Mikaïl

The Role of New Media and Communication Technologies in Arab Transitions By Manuel Manrique & Barah Mikaïl | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Information and Communication Technologies were an important catalyst of the Arab spring. They helped to bring down the Mubarak and Ben Ali regimes by mobilising important parts of the population and creating alternative discourses to authoritarian regimes, which found international backing. However, experiences from other parts of the world suggest that their role in sustaining the transition process in the longer run is less certain. ICTs can nonetheless support democratic consolidation by fostering an open public sphere and helping pro-democracy actors to remain engaged.

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Clay Shirky: How social media can make history | Video on TED.com

TED Talks While news from Iran streams to the world, Clay Shirky shows how Facebook, Twitter and TXTs help citizens in repressive regimes to report on real news, bypassing censors (however briefly).
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"The return of the Twitter Revolution?" Part II by donya

"The return of the Twitter Revolution?" Part II by donya | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Perhaps looking back on the rise of the "Twitter Revolution" nar­ra­tive can shed some light on the path for­ward, including how to approach its more subtle but per­sis­tent vari­ants such as “the Wikileaks Revolution” (Tunisia) and “Revolution 2.0” (Egypt). In Iran’s case, techno-utopianism in inter­na­tional cov­erage boomed due to for­eign jour­nal­ists being banned, cred­ited Iranian jour­nal­ists being restricted, and a young, mobile, tech-savvy, and highly edu­cated pop­u­la­tion being at the ready. Certainly, the Western audience’s recog­ni­tion of social media net­working sites such as Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube as pop­ular, Western, youth-oriented, and benign also played a part. But the “Twitter rev­o­lu­tion” also caught on due to a number of nar­ra­tives that, in the Western con­scious­ness, pre-existed the uprising.
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Iran News in English: Regime becomes more tech savvy... sort of by homylafayette

Iran News in English: Regime becomes more tech savvy... sort of by homylafayette | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Following the announcement by the Islamic Republic's security forces that a cyber-police squad had been formed, it was interesting to note the recent creation of a dozen pro-regime Twitter accounts.

They're a bit far from properly impersonating independent and grass-roots accounts as the following screen capture shows: identical tweets lauding Ayatollah Ali Khamenei were posted by several different 'users' at exactly the same time.
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Iran Elections: A Twitter Revolution? - washingtonpost.com

Iran Elections: A Twitter Revolution? - washingtonpost.com | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Evgeny Morozov, a blogger for Foreign Policy magazine and a fellow with the Open Society Institute, discusses the role of Twitter and other social-networking services during the Iranian elections.
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Evaluating Iran's Twitter Revolution by Jared Keller

Evaluating Iran's Twitter Revolution by Jared Keller | Twit4D | Scoop.it
At the height of mass post-election protests that took place a year ago this month in Iran, known as the "Green Revolution," Western media outlets were filled with a flurry of reports of protesters using Twitter, e-mail, blogs, and text messages to coordinate rallies, share information, and locate compatriots. Journalists were agape at the sudden influx of information coming out of the country, unusual in light of the Iranian authorities' media blackout.
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Double-edged diplomacy: U.S. tries to oust Iranian regime via Twitter | Examiner.com by Michael Hughes

Double-edged diplomacy: U.S. tries to oust Iranian regime via Twitter | Examiner.com by Michael Hughes | Twit4D | Scoop.it
A State Department spokesperson said the U.S. is attempting to topple the Iranian regime by encouraging opposition groups through targeted “tweets” amid violent anti-government protests that erupted in Iran on Monday, according to the USA Today’s Gary Strauss and Mimi Hall, who wrote:
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After Iran’s Twitter Revolution: Egypt by Eduardo Navas

A peaceful revolution against a regime that had been in power for 29 years sounds impossible until one evaluates the events that led to the fleeing of former President Hosni Mubarak out of Egypt on Friday, February 11. The Egyptian people was able to organize with the use of social media; it was Facebook that rose to the occasion. Needless to say that what happened in Egypt is undoubtedly of historical importance.
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Iran prepared to track dissent on social networks - Washington Times

Iran prepared to track dissent on social networks - Washington Times | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The Iranian government has high-tech equipment that will enable it to trace thousands of activists who have encouraged the recent demonstrations and spread news about them by using Twitter, cell phones and other Web-based social networks.
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Predictable Surprises: 10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard

Predictable Surprises:  10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Between now and 2015, there will be some predictable crises in global politics. The most predictable political crises have become the moments in which dictators ask tech-savvy voters to participate in a rigged election. Social media allows people to call out big organized lies, so rigged elections have become sensitive moments in international politics. Since we know these moments are on their way, and both foreign policy makers and journalists act surprised when they arrive, we can call such moments "predictable surprises".

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Social Networks Spread Defiance Online By Brad Stone & Noam Cohen

Social Networks Spread Defiance Online By Brad Stone & Noam Cohen | Twit4D | Scoop.it
As the embattled government of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad appears to be trying to limit Internet access and communications in Iran, new kinds of social media are challenging those traditional levers of state media control and allowing Iranians to find novel ways around the restrictions.
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Social Media: A Force for Political Change in Egypt by Kira Baiasu

Social Media: A Force for Political Change in Egypt by Kira Baiasu | Twit4D | Scoop.it
There has been much debate surrounding the role of social media in the 2011 Egyptian Revolution. Though the movement that led to the ousting of President Husni Mubarak has been dubbed the “Facebook Revolution,” it is not the first time that foreign media has been quick to connect a social networking site with a popular uprising. The 2009 Iranian protests were labeled the “Twitter Revolution,” and ever since there are those who are adamant that social media is a vital instrument for mobilizing the masses while others argue that social media is just a new means of communication in a history of popular uprisings that fared quite well without these new technological innovations.
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Iran's Twitter Revolution? Maybe Not Yet by Joel Schectman

Iran's Twitter Revolution? Maybe Not Yet by Joel Schectman | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Media across the globe have been focusing on a "Twitter Revolution" in Iran as hundreds of thousands of street protestors purportedly mobilized their demonstrations using the microblogging service. So great has the notion of Twitter's role in the Iranian protests become that the U.S. State Dept. reportedly asked the company to defer some maintenance.
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Iran's 'Twitter revolution' was exaggerated, says editor by Matthew Weaver

Iran's 'Twitter revolution' was exaggerated, says editor by Matthew Weaver | Twit4D | Scoop.it
It was described as the "Twitter revolution", but almost a year on from Iran's disputed presidential elections, during which the use of social media by the opposition movement made headlines around the world, such claims prompt wry smiles from seasoned observers
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Misreading Tehran: The Twitter Devolution - By Golnaz Esfandiari

Misreading Tehran: The Twitter Devolution - By Golnaz Esfandiari | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Before one of the major Iranian protests of the past year, a journalist in Germany showed me a list of three prominent Twitter accounts that were commenting on the events in Tehran and asked me if I knew the identities of the contributors. I told her I did, but she seemed disappointed when I told her that one of them was in the United States, one was in Turkey, and the third -- who specialized in urging people to "take to the streets" -- was based in Switzerland.
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Iran's Protests: Why Twitter Is the Medium of the Movement

Iran's Protests: Why Twitter Is the Medium of the Movement | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Easy for the average citizen to use and hard for any central authority
to control, Twitter is practically ideal for a mass protest movement. But its strengths are also its weaknesses
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Reporting War: Exploring the role of Twitter and social media in revolutions | Frontline Club by Daniel Bennett

I'm afraid I haven't been able to follow events in Tunisia and Egypt as closely as I would have liked as I was determined to enjoy an overdue holiday and a break from computer screens. And my mission was largely accomplished.

As part of an attempt to catch up, I've just been reading Jeff Jarvis, Jay Rosen and C.W. Anderson on the renewed argument over "Twitter revolutions". The role of Twitter in revolutions was first debated in 2009 with reference to Moldova and Iran and has been inevitably resurrected in light of the events in Tunisia and Egypt.
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ReTweet Revolution by Gilad Lotan

ReTweet Revolution by Gilad Lotan | Twit4D | Scoop.it
A visual exploration of Twitter conversation threads in the days following the Iranian Elections of June 2009
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