Twit4D
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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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From Twitter Revolution to Twitter Democracy by Koert Debeuf

From Twitter Revolution to Twitter Democracy by Koert Debeuf | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Since a few months, however, Egyptians are writing a new chapter of the Twitter-history. Twitter is now not only used to organise a revolution, but also to control the result of that revolution: democracy. During the elections for the People’s Assembly Twitter was used all over the country to report violations and fraud. As real electoral observation was refused by the government, these tweets counted as the most reliable information. After the elections there started a perhaps even more fascinating story. Since 23 January, tens of thousands Egyptians are watching the sessions of the newly elected parliament. Whenever a Member of Parliament says something good or bad, it is all around on Twitter. Or as @Mostafa wrote: “The public has the right to know what each MP says about each and every bit”. Is one MP sleeping for a minute? The next minute a picture of his little moment of weakness is all over the internet.

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Revolution, Women And Social Media in The Middle East

Revolution, Women And Social Media in The Middle East | Twit4D | Scoop.it
"The power of women is in their stories. They are not theories, they are real lives that, thanks to social networks, we are able to share and exchange," said Egyptian-American activist Mona el-Tahawey, kicking off a summit that brought more than a hundred of the Middle East's leading female activists together in Cairo.

With her arms still bandaged from the assault she suffered at the hands of Egypt's ruling military power last November, Tahawey was greeted like a celebrity by cyberactivists who only knew her from Twitter as she kicked off the Yahoo! Change Your World Cairo summit Wednesday.

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Online Activism & Revolution in Egypt by James Denselow

Online Activism & Revolution in Egypt by James Denselow | Twit4D | Scoop.it

It was not Facebook, Twitter or YouTube that brought down Hosni Mubarak. The Egyptian people did that. But this does not mean that social media and internet�based technologies played no role, or that their role was insignificant, as some have alleged. Rather, events in Egypt and countries across the Middle East and North Africa have shown in the 'Arab Spring' that internet platforms and technologies should be seen for what they are: effective tools for the conduct of political campaigns in authoritarian contexts.

This conclusion was reached in a new paper written by Tim Eaton who currently works for BBC Media Action on media development projects in the Middle East.

full study: http://bit.ly/x9mOAB

 

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La révolution arabe, fille de l'Internet ? by Marie Bénilde

La révolution arabe, fille de l'Internet ? by Marie Bénilde | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Quel rôle ont joué les nouveaux médias dans la chute des régimes autocratiques de Tunisie et d’Egypte ? Faut-il prêter à Facebook, et aux réseaux sociaux en général, la capacité de mobiliser des foules et de susciter des mouvements d’opposition ? Enseignements politico-médiatiques de révoltes puis de révolutions « en ligne ».

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Arab World: Global Voices Bridges on Twitter by Gilad Lotan

Arab World: Global Voices Bridges on Twitter by Gilad Lotan | Twit4D | Scoop.it
This past year has been eventful to say the least in our merry little Middle East and North Africa region. As a part of our end-of-year coverage we look back at some of the major events we covered during 2011. The following post highlights the role of the Global Voices Online community in spreading information on Twitter during the Tunisian and Egyptian revolutions.

The data that feeds this visualization is taken from “The Revolutions were Tweeted“, an International Journal of Communication article mapping out prominent information flows during the Egyptian and Tunisian revolutions. The study uses two datasets of tweets. The first includes 168,663 tweets posted between January 12 and 19, 2011, containing the keyword ‘#sidibouzid' or ‘tunisia'. The second includes 230,270 tweets posted between January 24 and 29, 2011, containing the keyword ‘egypt' or ‘#jan25′.

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How Luther went viral by the Economist

How Luther went viral by the Economist | Twit4D | Scoop.it
IT IS a familiar-sounding tale: after decades of simmering discontent a new form of media gives opponents of an authoritarian regime a way to express their views, register their solidarity and co-ordinate their actions. The protesters’ message spreads virally through social networks, making it impossible to suppress and highlighting the extent of public support for revolution. The combination of improved publishing technology and social networks is a catalyst for social change where previous efforts had failed.

That’s what happened in the Arab spring. It’s also what happened during the Reformation, nearly 500 years ago, when Martin Luther and his allies took the new media of their day—pamphlets, ballads and woodcuts—and circulated them through social networks to promote their message of religious reform.

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The Role of New Media and Communication Technologies in Arab Transitions By Manuel Manrique & Barah Mikaïl

The Role of New Media and Communication Technologies in Arab Transitions By Manuel Manrique & Barah Mikaïl | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Information and Communication Technologies were an important catalyst of the Arab spring. They helped to bring down the Mubarak and Ben Ali regimes by mobilising important parts of the population and creating alternative discourses to authoritarian regimes, which found international backing. However, experiences from other parts of the world suggest that their role in sustaining the transition process in the longer run is less certain. ICTs can nonetheless support democratic consolidation by fostering an open public sphere and helping pro-democracy actors to remain engaged.

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Le "printemps arabe", les islamistes et les autres by Alain Frachon

Le "printemps arabe", les islamistes et les autres by Alain Frachon | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Soyons honnêtes : ces lendemains électoraux de "printemps arabe" nous laissent la gueule de bois. Après le moment lyrico-révolutionnaire, retour au réel : la force dominante dans le monde arabe, ce sont les islamistes. Pas les courageux jeunes gens qui ont risqué leur vie au nom des libertés – d'expression, de mœurs, de rêve.
Première leçon. Le pouvoir ne revient pas aux gentils utilisateurs de Twitter, Facebook et autres "réseaux sociaux" ; il se prend à l'ancienne, avec des partis de militants bien organisés comme ceux des islamistes. Les élections ne se décident pas dans les cafés Internet.

 

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The #freemona Perfect Storm: Dissent and the Networked Public Sphere by Zeynep Tufekci

The #freemona Perfect Storm: Dissent and the Networked Public Sphere by  Zeynep Tufekci | Twit4D | Scoop.it
It was a calm, quite night, almost nine o’clock, on the eve of Thanksgiving holiday when, out of the corner of my eye, a tweet shook me:

Egyptian-American writer and my friend Mona El Tahawy, who had cut her trip in North Africa short to join the exploding Tahrir protests in her native country, had just sent that out. Short, uncapitalized, clearly written in a hurry. And with that, she went silent.

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Mapping @TahrirSupplies by Nicola Hughes

Mapping @TahrirSupplies by Nicola Hughes | Twit4D | Scoop.it

One of our users I recently met in New York said ScraperWiki is “a great tool for hacktivism”. Because of this we have a lot of ‘hacktivists’ in our community. One such ‘hacktivist’ is Thomas Levine. He’s recently scraped @TahrirSupplies, a twitter account set up to crowd-source the need for suplies at Tahrir Square and matching them with availabilities in the surrounding area.

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Do “Liberation Technologies” Change the Balance of Power Between Repressive Regimes and Civil Society? By Patrick Meier

Do “Liberation Technologies” Change the Balance of Power Between Repressive Regimes and Civil Society? By Patrick Meier | Twit4D | Scoop.it

o new information and communication technologies (ICTs) empower repressive regimes at the expense of civil society, or vice versa? For example, does access to the Internet and mobile phones alter the balance of power between repressive regimes and civil society? These questions are especially pertinent today given the role that ICTs played during this year’s uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt and beyond. Indeed, as one Egyptian activist stated, “We use Facebook to schedule our protests, Twitter to coordinate and YouTube to tell the world.” But do these new ICTs—so called “liberation technologies”—really threaten repressive rule? The purpose of this dissertation is to use mixed-methods research to answer these questions.

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Social media, tipping points and revolutions by Mathew Ingram

Social media, tipping points and revolutions by Mathew Ingram | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The issue of whether — or how much — social-media tools such as Facebook and Twitter influenced the “Arab Spring” revolutions in Egypt and elsewhere has been a contentious one since the first rock was thrown in Tunisia earlier this year. But as more experts have studied the events in those countries, it has become increasingly clear that social tools and networks played a fairly critical role in helping turn what had been undercurrents of dissent into open revolt.
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BBC - BBC Radio 4 Programmes - Start the Week, Revolution: Wael Ghonim, Paul Mason and Mary King

On Start the Week Andrew Marr talks revolution. Wael Ghonim explains how social networks played a vital role in the Arab Spring. His Facebook page,'We Are All Khaled Said', which featured the death of a young Egyptian, inspired a new generation to fight oppression. Mary King, Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies looks back to earlier struggles in eastern Europe, and the journalist Paul Mason explores how far the worldwide economic crisis and growing inequality lie behind the new revolutions.

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Egypt and the Arab Spring +1 Year

Egypt and the Arab Spring +1 Year | Twit4D | Scoop.it

As hundreds of thousands throng Cairo’s Tahrir Square today in celebration, remembrance and continued vigilance, it is worth thinking through the implications of these remarkable events for our understanding of digital activism. My book on the Egyptian revolution is forthcoming, but if I could distill 5 important takeaways, they would be this:

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#january25 One Year Later: Social Media & Politics 3.0 by Rory O'Connor

#january25 One Year Later: Social Media & Politics 3.0 by Rory O'Connor | Twit4D | Scoop.it

One year ago, a revolution began in Egypt that still reverberates there -- as well as among other repressive rulers and regimes in Syria, Bahrain, Yemen, Saudi Arabia and beyond, including thousands of miles away in New York City, where "Occupy Wall Street" protests in turn took root and then flowered into literally hundreds of similar protests all around the nation and the world. From Tunis to Tahrir Square -- but also from London, Madrid and Rome to Athens, Tel Aviv and Tokyo -- millions were on the march, demanding more respect, hope, dignity and democracy.

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Révolutions 2.0 ou aubaine marketing? by Myrtille Delamarche

Révolutions 2.0 ou aubaine marketing? by Myrtille Delamarche | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Les printemps sont passés, et avec eux les banderoles et graffitis «Merci Facebook», «merci Twitter». Il est temps d’interroger le rôle réel des réseaux dans les mouvements sociaux.

 Sur la page Facebook de Transterra Media, une plate-forme participative de vente de contenus journalistiques à destination des professionnels, on apprend que la société a été «fondée en 2011 pendant le printemps arabe». Avec ses bureaux à New York, Beyrouth et Le Caire, la plate-forme propose d’ailleurs de nombreuses images des protestations en Égypte. Pourtant, dans un article du magazine économique libanais le Commerce du Levant, on apprend que «L’idée du projet revient à deux Américains, Jonathan Giesen et Eli Andrews. Alors qu’ils habitaient au Caire tous les deux en 2006.»

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Social Media and the Arab Spring Zeynep Tufekci ITW by Marco Werman

Social Media and the Arab Spring  Zeynep Tufekci ITW by Marco Werman | Twit4D | Scoop.it
On December 17, 2010, a young unemployed man set himself on fire in Tunisia.

Mohammed Bouazizi took that desperate step in protest, after officials had blocked his attempts to make a living selling fruit on the street.

His self-immolation sparked a wave of anti-government protests, first in Tunisia, then all across the Middle East.

And technology and social media have played key roles in many of the pro-democracy movements of the Arab Spring. Anchor Marco Werman speaks with Zeynep Tufekci, a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society.

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Al-Shabab's tweets won't boost its cause

Al-Shabab's tweets won't boost its cause | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Somalia's al-Shabab militants are now using Twitter. You can follow the account @HSMPress – derived from the Shabab's full name, Harakat al-Shabab al-Mujahideen, or Movement of Freedom Fighter Youth – for pithy updates on their violent campaign to bring a rigorous version of conservative Islam to east Africa and beyond, all in 140 characters or less. The account already has more than 3,000 followers. Are the al-Shabab tweeters jealous of their Afghan Taliban counterparts whose own account @alemarahweb has 6,000 followers? Like all Twitter users they'd deny it, of course – and probably be lying. 

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Blogueurs et journalistes rejouent les printemps arabes à Bruxelles

Blogueurs et journalistes rejouent les printemps arabes à Bruxelles | Twit4D | Scoop.it
MÉDITERRANÉE. Ce pourrait être un peu l'histoire de la poule et de l’œuf ! Les blogueurs et autres internautes sont-ils à à l'origine des Printemps arabes ou les révolutions ont-elles favorisé l'éclosion des médias sociaux ?
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Arab Democracy & Social Media by Ethan Zuckerman

Ethan Zuckerman uses data to shine a light on the affronts of censorship. A passionate advocate for free speech in the developing world, Zuckerman is director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT. Current projects include the study of tools for censorship circumvention and the Media Cloud framework for the quantitative study of digital media. Zuckerman is the founder of Geekcorps, a technology volunteer corps, and cofounder of Global Voices Online, an ever-growing network of international citizen-bloggers. Zuckerman will give insight into the interplay of established and social media and their relationship to shifting power structures.

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The Power of Social Media in Developing Nations by Amir Hatem Ali

The Power of Social Media in Developing Nations by Amir Hatem Ali | Twit4D | Scoop.it

On January 28, 2011, Egypt’s President, Hosni Mubarak, took the drastic and unprecedented step of shutting off the Internet for five days across
an entire nation. His reason for doing so was simple: to halt the flow of
communication and coordinated assembly taking place over social media
platforms, like Facebook and Twitter...

Permalink to the study: http://bit.ly/uJkjV3

 

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The Arab revolution: “We have a lot to learn from them” Jean-Pierre Filiu ITW

What are the main social dynamics of the waves of revolt in the Arab world in 2011? Jean-Pierre Filiu, scholar and author of "The Arab Revolution: Ten Lessons from the Democratic Uprising", discusses the question with Paul Hockenos.
Paul Hockenos: The social media played a key role across the Arab world in the upheavals of 2011, a theme you elaborate upon in your book The Arab Revolution. Why, then, do you caution not to exaggerate their importance?

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Mona Eltahawy on the "Twitter Revolutions"

During the Egyptian revolution, at least 65,000 people heard every hashtagged statement Egyptian-American journalist Mona Eltahawy shared on her popular Twitter account. And yet, in an interview with the CIC, Eltahawy objects to the idea that the ousting of Mubarak was somehow a "Twitter revolution."

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Arab Spring Activists Sit Down With Silicon Valley Suits by Taylor Wiles

Arab Spring Activists Sit Down With Silicon Valley Suits by Taylor Wiles | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Last week, tech executives and Internet activists swarmed San Francisco for the first ever Silicon Valley Human Rights Conference. The two-day event focused on the increasingly complex relationship between the Internet and human rights. Access, an advocacy organization for Internet rights, hosted the conference, and drew representatives from influential players in Silicon Valley and activists arriving from revolution or government oppression in places like Egypt, Syria, Uganda, and Thailand.

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