Twit4D
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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Digital technology driving global social change

Digital technology driving global social change | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Global events in 2011 demonstrated the impact that technology plays in driving social change movements. A new Walden University survey of 11 countries shows that most adults in countries around the world (89%, on average) agree that technology can turn a cause into a movement faster than anything else can. These views were particularly prevalent in Spain (93%), Canada(91%), Brazil (91%), Great Britain (91%) and China (91%).

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China's Twitter - inside Sina Weibo by Daniel Bennett

China's Twitter - inside Sina Weibo by Daniel Bennett | Twit4D | Scoop.it
I was reading a Foreign Policy article about the Chinese government's "deep suspicion of social media and the Internet" which included a link to a very interesting presentation about Sina Weibo - one of several Chinese answers to Twitter.
Founded in August 2009, Sina Weibo had 80-100 million users by the end of 2010. The author of the presentation, Bill Bishop, suggests it is superior to Twitter.
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Report: Chinese equivalent of Twitter censors Hillary Clinton By Gautham Nagesh

Report: Chinese equivalent of Twitter censors Hillary Clinton By Gautham Nagesh | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The Chinese microblog service Sina has blocked searches for the Chinese words for "Hillary Clinton" and "Hillary" in apparent response to the Secretary of State's recent remarks against countries that censor or block the Internet.
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The Revolt of China’s Twittering Classes by Hu Yong - Project Syndicate

The Revolt of China’s Twittering Classes by Hu Yong - Project Syndicate | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Ever since Iranians used Twitter to swap information and inform the outside world about the mushrooming protests against the stolen presidential election of June 2009, there has been much discussion of the role of digital activism in authoritarian countries like China. Does Web 2.0 technology imply an analogous role for “Twivolution” in a Chinese democratic transition one day?
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Facebook, Twitter et la révolution mondiale by Yves Eudes

Au cours des années 2000, Google, YouTube et Yahoo! s'étaient déconsidérés auprès de la frange la plus politisée des internautes, car ils s'étaient compromis avec divers gouvernements dictatoriaux, dont la Chine. Pour s'installer sur le marché chinois, Google avait accepté des arrangements bancals avec les bureaucrates de Pékin chargés de la censure du Net. Yahoo! avait livré à la police chinoise l'identité d'un dissident anonyme qui utilisait sa messagerie. Les géants américains de l'Internet avaient ainsi acquis une image purement mercantile : des entreprises ordinaires, prêtes à tout pour gagner des parts de marché.
La réhabilitation s'amorce vers la fin de la décennie, grâce à la naissance des nouveaux réseaux sociaux comme Facebook et Twitter.
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A Revolution Is Not A Tweetup: Jasmine Revolution And The Limits Of China's Internet by Gady Epstein

A Revolution Is Not A Tweetup: Jasmine Revolution And The Limits Of China's Internet by Gady Epstein | Twit4D | Scoop.it
It is not uncommon to see China media coverage running along at least two sets of tracks that should crash into each other often but too rarely cross on the page: the political story and the economic story. The so-called Jasmine Revolution and the last week of news about China’s Internet show how those tracks intersect far more than we appreciate.
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The Twitter Revolution Debate Is Dead | The Atlantic by Ella chou

The debate about the role of digital social media in social movements is brought to a new height with events in Tunisia and Egypt. Chinese netizens also labeled the success of the Egyptian demonstrations a victory of the "Twitter Revolution". Graham Webster, graduate student in political science at the University of Washington, who studies China and the intersection of technology and politics, writes in to say that the Twitter revolution is dead, and he makes a cogent argument for cyber pragmatism:
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Twitter Seen As Tool For Social Change In China : NPR

When Iranians used Twitter to get out news about their recent election, people took note in China. Compared with Iran, Twitter played a much smaller role in the recent ethnic clashes in western China. But many Chinese believe Twitter and its Chinese imitators, like Jiwai, have considerable potential to change their media and their society.
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