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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Revolution, Women And Social Media in The Middle East

Revolution, Women And Social Media in The Middle East | Twit4D | Scoop.it
"The power of women is in their stories. They are not theories, they are real lives that, thanks to social networks, we are able to share and exchange," said Egyptian-American activist Mona el-Tahawey, kicking off a summit that brought more than a hundred of the Middle East's leading female activists together in Cairo.

With her arms still bandaged from the assault she suffered at the hands of Egypt's ruling military power last November, Tahawey was greeted like a celebrity by cyberactivists who only knew her from Twitter as she kicked off the Yahoo! Change Your World Cairo summit Wednesday.

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Predictable Surprises: 10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard

Predictable Surprises:  10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Between now and 2015, there will be some predictable crises in global politics. The most predictable political crises have become the moments in which dictators ask tech-savvy voters to participate in a rigged election. Social media allows people to call out big organized lies, so rigged elections have become sensitive moments in international politics. Since we know these moments are on their way, and both foreign policy makers and journalists act surprised when they arrive, we can call such moments "predictable surprises".

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Bahrain: #NickKristof Bullied on Twitter · Global Voices

Bahrain: #NickKristof Bullied on Twitter · Global Voices | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Since arriving in Bahrain on February 15, New York Times columnist Nicholas D. Kristof has joined the many voices on Twitter live-reporting turbulent events. While many have been thankful for his updates, and even worried for his safety when tweeting slowed, others have instead taken to bullying the reporter. The tweets mostly consist of accusing Kristof of lying in the most creative terms.
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Tunisia and Bahrain Block Individual Twitter Pages by Jillian C. York

Tunisia and Bahrain Block Individual Twitter Pages by Jillian C. York | Twit4D | Scoop.it
First, governments blocked Blogspot. Then they blocked Facebook, and then Twitter. And just when technophiles all over the globe started groaning, a couple of governments got a bit wiser to social media and, rather than block the entire platform for the transgressions of one user, began blocking individual accounts instead. Notably, this has happened in the past with YouTube where, rather than cut off the video-sharing site for all users, a government will simply block a single video; the latest trend seems to be blocking individual Twitter pages.
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Foreign Affairs Live: Experts Debate The Role of Social Media In Political Protests by Neil Glassman

Foreign Affairs Live: Experts Debate The Role of Social Media In Political Protests by Neil Glassman | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Popular protests in countries from Tunisia and Egypt to Bahrain and Libya have shaken the Middle East’s established order to its roots. Are they evidence of the political power of social media? Have the Internet, Facebook, Twitter and other innovations ushered in a revolutionary new era in global politics?
Last evening, as part of its Foreign Affairs Live series, the Council on Foreign Relations explored these crucial questions with new media guru Clay Shirky and Anne-Marie Slaughter, former director of policy planning at the State Department.
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An Activist Stands Her Ground in Bahrain by Robert Mackey

An Activist Stands Her Ground in Bahrain by Robert Mackey | Twit4D | Scoop.it
During a protest in Bahrain on Saturday, an American journalist named Matthew Cassel reported on Twitter that he had just witnessed something remarkable: a lone female protester who refused to move as police officers in riot gear charged past her, firing tear gas shells just a few feet from her head.

A short time later, after a photograph and a brief video clip of the woman standing her ground in front of a line of police vehicles was uploaded to Twitter, readers of Mr. Cassel’s feed identified her as Zainab Alkhawaja, an activist whose own Angry Arabiya Twitter feed is devoted to documenting the protest movement in Bahrain.

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Twitter Trolling as Propaganda Tactic: Bahrain and Syria by Jillian C. York

Twitter Trolling as Propaganda Tactic: Bahrain and Syria by Jillian C. York | Twit4D | Scoop.it

I’ve spent the past few months documenting the tactics of the Syrian Electronic Army and other factions in respect to spreading propaganda to counter anti-opposition sentiment (you can find my writing on the SEA here, here, and here; and an interview with NPR here). I’ve mainly focused on the utility of hacktivism in awareness-raising, with some emphasis on the effectiveness of flooding the dominant media narrative for the purpose of gaining attention for the other side (in this case, the pro-regime side), but what I haven’t touched on is the longer-term effect these tactics are having on people both in-country and outside, as well as where this type of activity fits in the broader landscape of online activism in the region.

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Protests In Libya, Bahrain Visualized Using Twitter, Google Maps by Catharine Smith

Protests In Libya, Bahrain Visualized Using Twitter, Google Maps by Catharine Smith | Twit4D | Scoop.it
As protests continue across the Middle East and North Africa, a few tech-savvy individuals have crafted simple tools for tracking recent developments by tapping into social media platforms.
Software developer Virender Ajmani created a Google Maps Mashup that plots recent tweets from Bahrain, Egypt, Libya and Iran in real-time (or close to it).
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Why the tweet will never replace the street By Ariel Sabar

Lost in all the breathless tributes to Facebook and Twitter as catalysts for the recent Middle East protests is a far older and more vital form of social media: the actual, brick-and-mortar public square. The e–activist may have replaced the pamphleteer, but it was only once thousands of people massed in Egypt’s Tahrir Square, Tunisia’s Casbah Square, and Bahrain’s Pearl Square that the movements showed themselves as something more than a tinkling of keystrokes.
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