Twit4D
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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
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Occupy Together: how the global movement is spreading via social media by Hannah Waldram

Occupy Together: how the global movement is spreading via social media by Hannah Waldram | Twit4D | Scoop.it
At the beginning of October last year Malcolm Gladwell wrote in the New Yorker that activism via social media was no more than "weak-tie connections" which "makes it easier for activists to express themselves, and harder for that expression to have any impact".

One year on, with #arabspring uprisings changing governments in north Africa and #OccupyWallStreet drawing the attention of senior Republicans and Democrats, the #globaldemocracy movement is gaining momentum via Twitter and Facebook. Now protests are planned for Saturday in four continents, I wonder if Gladwell will rethink the power of social networked activism. full map: http://map.15october.net/

 

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Gladwell Won't Get It: The Real Role of Twitter in Global Protest by Maria Bustillos

Gladwell Won't Get It: The Real Role of Twitter in Global Protest by Maria Bustillos | Twit4D | Scoop.it
There was a lot wrong with Malcolm Gladwell's super-ballyhooed piece, "Small Change," in the New Yorker last October. In it, he suggested that the Civil Rights movement in the U.S. took place without Twitter or Facebook, because they hadn't been invented yet. Now that the same questions have come up again with respect to recent events in Egypt, Gladwell hopped right onto the New Yorker blog to complain some more about how not-important Twitter is.
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Today's networked activists can achieve real change by Paul Hilder

Today's networked activists can achieve real change by Paul Hilder | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Were the revolutions in Egypt and Tunisia simply a consequence of the internet and its mysterious powers? Or was New Yorker writer Malcolm Gladwell right to argue, in a widely read piece, that today's networked activists are trivial and ineffective by comparison with the courageous sit-in organisers of the civil rights movement?
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Malcolm Gladwell: Social Media Still Not a Big Deal

Malcolm Gladwell: Social Media Still Not a Big Deal | Twit4D | Scoop.it
After the uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt, many wondered whether author Malcolm Gladwell would alter his skeptical stance on social media -- but he made it clear in a CNN interview that he still doesn't think tools like Twitter or Facebook make much of a difference.
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Wallflowers at the Revolution by Frank Rich

Wallflowers at the Revolution by Frank Rich | Twit4D | Scoop.it
A month ago most Americans could not have picked Hosni Mubarak out of a police lineup. American foreign policy, even in Afghanistan, was all but invisible throughout the 2010 election season. Foreign aid is the only federal budget line that a clear-cut majority of Americans says should be cut.
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Is digital activism an effective medium for change? by Jaz Cummins

Is digital activism an effective medium for change? by Jaz Cummins | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Malcolm Gladwell says social media can't effect real-life change, Facebook and Twitter devotees think otherwise. Who's right?
"The revolution will not be tweeted" read the provocative standfirst on a piece by Malcolm Gladwell in the New Yorker last week, questioning the value of Twitter and Facebook as a tool for effecting real change.
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Of Cyber-Skeptics and Cyber-Utopians – Debunking Myths and Discussing the Future | meta-activism project by Nikila Srinivasan

Of Cyber-Skeptics and Cyber-Utopians – Debunking Myths and Discussing the Future | meta-activism project by Nikila Srinivasan | Twit4D | Scoop.it
About ten days before the events of January 25, the media was abuzz with writers and influential thinkers wondering if the Tunisian revolution was a Twitter revolution or not. The camps, as usual, were divided, with incessant criticism from cyber-skeptics and their tirades against cyber-utopians. Sifting through the widespread commentary about digital activism in the wake of the extraordinary events of the revolution at Egypt, the polarity of opinions is jarring.
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Weak Ties, Twitter and Revolution By Jonah Lehrer

Just a quick note on Malcolm Gladwell’s Twitter/Social Change article in The New Yorker:
It’s an extremely thought-provoking piece, written with the usual flair. For those who haven’t read it, Gladwell argues that online social networks aren’t suited for “real” social activism, so all the utopian predictions about Twitter and Iran, or Facebook and Obama, will never come to pass.
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The Twitter Revolution Debate Is Dead | The Atlantic by Ella chou

The debate about the role of digital social media in social movements is brought to a new height with events in Tunisia and Egypt. Chinese netizens also labeled the success of the Egyptian demonstrations a victory of the "Twitter Revolution". Graham Webster, graduate student in political science at the University of Washington, who studies China and the intersection of technology and politics, writes in to say that the Twitter revolution is dead, and he makes a cogent argument for cyber pragmatism:
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» Weak Ties, Twitter and Revolution

Just a quick note on Malcolm Gladwell's Twitter/Social Change article in The New Yorker: It's an extremely thought-provoking piece, written with the usual
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News Desk: Does Egypt Need Twitter? by Malcolm Gladwell

News Desk: Does Egypt Need Twitter? by Malcolm Gladwell | Twit4D | Scoop.it
When Mao famously said that power springs from the barrel of a gun, it was assumed that he was talking about guns. There wasn’t much interest at the time in how he chose to communicate that sentiment: whether he said it in a speech, say, or whispered it to a friend, or wrote it in his diary or published it in a book. That would never happen today, of course. We now believe that the “how” of a communicative act is of huge importance.
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Harnessing The Power Of Social Media In International Relations by Fergus Hanson

Twitter may be just another way of sharing inane chatter, but if you have written the service off, think again. Social media has emerged as a powerful new tool in international relations, and it deserves closer attention.
The wonderful and frightening thing about social media and Web 2.0 technologies is that their consequences are so unpredictable. When Jack Dorsey launched Twitter in 2006, did he envisage that the medium would end up playing a role in the attempted overthrow of the regime in Tehran?
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Weak Ties, Twitter and Revolution By Jonah Lehrer

Just a quick note on Malcolm Gladwell’s Twitter/Social Change article in The New Yorker:
It’s an extremely thought-provoking piece, written with the usual flair. For those who haven’t read it, Gladwell argues that online social networks aren’t suited for “real” social activism, so all the utopian predictions about Twitter and Iran, or Facebook and Obama, will never come to pass. This is because, Gladwell says, online networks are all about weak ties — a weak tie is a friend of a friend, or a casual acquaintance — whereas real activism (he uses the example of the civil rights movement, led by Martin Luther King) depends on strong ties, or those people you know and trust:
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Malcolm Gladwell Insists It's Just A Coincidence Egyptian Rebels Had Access To Twitter by Caroline Shin

Malcolm Gladwell Insists It's Just A Coincidence Egyptian Rebels Had Access To Twitter by Caroline Shin | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Last year Malcolm Gladwell famously discarded the role of social media in revolutions, and having witnessed the Facebook revolution in Egypt, is still sticking to his point. And raising certain issues.
"I've been as dumbstruck as everyone else by what's happened in the Middle East," he told CNN recently.
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Is Malcolm Gladwell wrong on Egypt and social media? By David Case

Is Malcolm Gladwell wrong on Egypt and social media? By David Case | Twit4D | Scoop.it
BOSTON — Love him or hate him — and there are plenty of people on either side — Malcolm Gladwell is undeniably provocative. By devising big, here’s-how-the-world-works theories, and supporting them with lively anecdotes, Gladwell has forged a remarkable career for himself, as a New Yorker writer and best-selling author. While most scribes celebrate a brief stopover on the New York Times bestseller list, Gladwell’s books — the "Tipping Point," "Blink" and "Outliers" — stick around for years.
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Digital and social activism: no small change by Timi Stoop-Alcala

Digital and social activism: no small change by Timi Stoop-Alcala | Twit4D | Scoop.it
The social upheaval that exploded in Tunisia and Egypt is spreading across the Arab World. At the time of this writing, dissent is snowballing in Libya, Bahrain and Iran.

In the wake of these extraordinary events, a myriad of discussions on the role the Internet and the social web has emerged. Cyber-utopians are praising Twitter and Facebook to the heavens; cyber-sceptics are pooh-poohing the contribution of social networks in spawning social change.
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Exclusive: Biz Stone on Twitter and Activism | The Atlantic

Exclusive: Biz Stone on Twitter and Activism | The Atlantic | Twit4D | Scoop.it
In this essay, Twitter's co-founder argues that social media can -- and has -- helped create real change.
The New Yorker recently published a thoughtfully written article by Malcolm Gladwell titled, "Small Change: Why The Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted." Citing research done by Stanford sociologist Doug McAdam, Mr. Gladwell compares what he sees happening today among people connected by modern social media to the African-American Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. Real social change, Gladwell argues, is a phenomenon driven by something described as "strong ties" in the field of mathematical sociology.
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Why Malcolm Gladwell Should Apologize to Social Media by Edward Lee

Gladwell didn't defend his original argument that hierarchy is essential to political movements, much less his central thesis that social media creates only "weak ties" that cannot sustain political revolutions.
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From Innovation to Revolution | Foreign Affairs By Malcolm Gladwell and Clay Shirky

From Innovation to Revolution | Foreign Affairs By Malcolm Gladwell and Clay Shirky | Twit4D | Scoop.it
o the tools of social media make it possible for protesters to challenge their governments? Malcolm Gladwell argues that there is no evidence that they do; Clay Shirky disagrees.
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Jay Rosen Is Wrong abt “Twitter Revolution” And “Facebook Revolution”... by Omri Ceren

Jay Rosen Is Wrong abt “Twitter Revolution” And “Facebook Revolution”... by Omri Ceren | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Evangelists of new communication technologies always always always make utopian promises about social change. And those promises always always always fall
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Malcolm Gladwell, Your Slip is Showing by Brian Solis

Time is always limited, but in these historic times, I wished to add perspective in the hopes of moving this important conversation in a productive direction.
Malcolm Gladwell continues his march toward dissension with his latest installment in the New Yorker about social media vs. social activism. Honestly, Gladwell is more than welcome to share his thoughts as it is a democratized information economy after all. I do find it alarming however, that he is wielding his influence through an equally influential medium to spin intellectual and impressionable minds in unrewarding and pointless cycles. Is he not listening to opposition or consulting existing research?
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