Twit4D
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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Would Anonymity Help Activists on Facebook? A Response to Luke Allnutt by Jillian C. York

Would Anonymity Help Activists on Facebook? A Response to Luke Allnutt
Luke Allnutt has a thoughtful piece on RFE/RL asking the above question: Would anonymity help activists on Facebook? His response, “maybe not,” relies on the idea that anonymity would be extended only to those with special “activist status,” something I haven’t heard concretely argued as a potential model but which is nonetheless troubling. Allnutt writes:
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Twitter doesn’t start a revolution, people do by Luke Allnutt


It is not technology per se that has the power to change the world, but rather the motivations (both good and evil) of the people using it.
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Tunisia: Can We Please Stop Talking About 'Twitter Revolutions'? - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty © 2011

Tunisia: Can We Please Stop Talking About 'Twitter Revolutions'? - Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty © 2011 | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Twitter revolution narratives are popular because rather than being about Tunisia, they are often really about ourselves.
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Would Anonymity Help Activists On Facebook? Maybe Not by Luke Allnutt

Would Anonymity Help Activists On Facebook? Maybe Not by Luke Allnutt | Twit4D | Scoop.it
There is an interesting debate about whether Facebook, which theoretically insists on a real-name policy, should allow activists to use pseudonyms on the site. In 2010, the Egyptian We Are All Khaled Said group was deactivated by Facebook because the administrators had registered it under pseudonymous accounts.
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Taking The Slack Out Of Slacktivism by Luke Allnutt

Taking The Slack Out Of Slacktivism by Luke Allnutt | Twit4D | Scoop.it
In her speech on Internet freedom on February 15, Hillary Clinton referred to a debate about whether the Internet is “a force for liberation or repression.” To be brutally reductive, you might call that debate the Morozov Vs. Shirky debate. The media often reduces the debate further to two competing narratives: “Facebook Will Set Us Free” Vs. “Twitter Can’t Topple Dictators” (to use Jay Rosen’s term.)
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