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Twit4D
How Twitter serves (or not) social & political changes
Curated by Elie Levasseur
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Russia Twitter protests 'spammed'

Russia Twitter protests 'spammed' | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Hijacked PCs may have helped drown out online chat about Russian election protests, say security experts. The computers were used to disrupt Twitter as Russians chatted about ongoing protests in Moscow's Triumphal Square, said security firm Trend Micro.

Analysis of the many pro-Kremlin messages posted to some discussions suggested they were sent by machines.

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Welcoming (?) Al-Shabaab to Twitter by Ethan Zuckerman

Welcoming (?) Al-Shabaab to Twitter by Ethan Zuckerman | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Somedays it seems that everyone has joined Twitter. And then a new account comes along and raises interesting questions about what the service is for and how it should be used.

Welcome to Twitter, Harakat Al-Shabaab Al Mujahideen Press Office, now tweeting at @HSMPress.

 

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Le "printemps arabe", les islamistes et les autres by Alain Frachon

Le "printemps arabe", les islamistes et les autres by Alain Frachon | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Soyons honnêtes : ces lendemains électoraux de "printemps arabe" nous laissent la gueule de bois. Après le moment lyrico-révolutionnaire, retour au réel : la force dominante dans le monde arabe, ce sont les islamistes. Pas les courageux jeunes gens qui ont risqué leur vie au nom des libertés – d'expression, de mœurs, de rêve.
Première leçon. Le pouvoir ne revient pas aux gentils utilisateurs de Twitter, Facebook et autres "réseaux sociaux" ; il se prend à l'ancienne, avec des partis de militants bien organisés comme ceux des islamistes. Les élections ne se décident pas dans les cafés Internet.

 

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The Internet and Democracy - Evgeny Morozov, Jillian York, Deirdre Mulligan

Are the insurgencies spawned in the Arab Spring riding a wave borne by the internet, or are the new information technologies more likely to subvert those very movements? A discussion featuring Evgeny Morozov, an internet-savvy analyst of social protest and author of The Net Delusion, and Jillian York, who writes and speaks regularly about free expression, politics, and the internet, with a focus on the Arab world. Moderated by Deirdre Mulligan, professor of law at the UC Berkeley School of Information and a faculty director of the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology. Presented by Dissent, ISSI's Center for Research on Social Change, and CITRIS Data and Democracy Initiative

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Média citoyen, relais d’engagements associatifs et outil de démocratie participative by Bruno Marzloff

Média citoyen, relais d’engagements associatifs et outil de démocratie participative by Bruno Marzloff | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Ce n’est pas le numérique qui favorise la révolution, c’est l’envie de révolution qui a suscité le numérique pour s’accomplir. Le numérique est la signature de l’autonomie et de la rupture. Le moteur est le même qui agite les foules en Tunisie et qui transforme le quotidien des gens à Paris, même si les plans ne sont pas les mêmes.

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Arab Democracy & Social Media by Ethan Zuckerman

Ethan Zuckerman uses data to shine a light on the affronts of censorship. A passionate advocate for free speech in the developing world, Zuckerman is director of the Center for Civic Media at MIT. Current projects include the study of tools for censorship circumvention and the Media Cloud framework for the quantitative study of digital media. Zuckerman is the founder of Geekcorps, a technology volunteer corps, and cofounder of Global Voices Online, an ever-growing network of international citizen-bloggers. Zuckerman will give insight into the interplay of established and social media and their relationship to shifting power structures.

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How the 99% Are Using Lateral Power to Create a Global Revolution by Jeremy Rifkin

How the 99% Are Using Lateral Power to Create a Global Revolution by Jeremy Rifkin | Twit4D | Scoop.it

It's happened before, in 1848 and in 1968. The youth of the world took to the streets to protest the injustices of autocratic political regimes and rapacious business interests and to demand the most basic human right to participate as equal citizens in the affairs of society.

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The #freemona Perfect Storm: Dissent and the Networked Public Sphere by Zeynep Tufekci

The #freemona Perfect Storm: Dissent and the Networked Public Sphere by  Zeynep Tufekci | Twit4D | Scoop.it
It was a calm, quite night, almost nine o’clock, on the eve of Thanksgiving holiday when, out of the corner of my eye, a tweet shook me:

Egyptian-American writer and my friend Mona El Tahawy, who had cut her trip in North Africa short to join the exploding Tahrir protests in her native country, had just sent that out. Short, uncapitalized, clearly written in a hurry. And with that, she went silent.

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Occupy Research: Methods and Tools for a Decentralized Future by Amelia Marzec

Occupy Research: Methods and Tools for a Decentralized Future by Amelia Marzec | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Occupy Research is a highly participatory band of researchers active in the Occupy Wall Street movement, with working groups popping up across the country. Committed to using open methods, they outline different areas of interest in a wiki and share ideas, tools, and information about the movement.

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Semiocast — Arabic highest growth on Twitter — English expression stabilizes below 40%

Semiocast — Arabic highest growth on Twitter — English expression stabilizes below 40% | Twit4D | Scoop.it

En octobre 2011, plus de 2 millions de messages publics sur Twitter s'échangeaient chaque jour en arabe, une progression spectaculaire par rapport aux 30 000 tweets quotidiens en arabe en juillet 2010, d'après une nouvelle étude ayant porté sur 5,6 milliards de tweets.

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Lawmakers, Twitter locked in dispute over Taliban tweets by Brian Bennett

Lawmakers, Twitter locked in dispute over Taliban tweets by Brian Bennett | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Some members of Congress are urging the popular website Twitter to stop hosting pro- Taliban tweets that celebrate attacks against American and allied forces in Afghanistan .
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Mona Eltahawy on the "Twitter Revolutions"

During the Egyptian revolution, at least 65,000 people heard every hashtagged statement Egyptian-American journalist Mona Eltahawy shared on her popular Twitter account. And yet, in an interview with the CIC, Eltahawy objects to the idea that the ousting of Mubarak was somehow a "Twitter revolution."

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The End of Cyber Utopia by Evgeny Morozov

Smartphones and social media seem to be the new weapons used to topple both dictators and old power structures. The euphoria over the Internet and its revolutionary role seems endless. One man, Evgeny Morozov states that this is nothing more than a mirage. He takes Backlight into his battle against cyber utopianism.

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#ARRESTme2 Campaign Launched in Russia to Rally Support for Democracy Activists by Micah L. Sifry

Russian democracy activist Maria Gaidar has launched a social media campaign in solidarity with the hundreds of people who have been arrested in the wake of post-election protests called ARRESTme2. On her LiveJournal blog, she calls on readers to declare their solidarity with people like blogger Alexei Navalny by tweeting using the #ARRESTme2 hashtag and by joining and spreading a Facebook group with the same goal. She writes (with lousy translation provided by Google Translate):

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Blogueurs et journalistes rejouent les printemps arabes à Bruxelles

Blogueurs et journalistes rejouent les printemps arabes à Bruxelles | Twit4D | Scoop.it
MÉDITERRANÉE. Ce pourrait être un peu l'histoire de la poule et de l’œuf ! Les blogueurs et autres internautes sont-ils à à l'origine des Printemps arabes ou les révolutions ont-elles favorisé l'éclosion des médias sociaux ?
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9 Social Media Uprisings That Sought to Change the World in 2011

9 Social Media Uprisings That Sought to Change the World in 2011 | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Social media has not only been at the core of major protest stories, but drove some of 2011′s biggest news, from Occupy Wall Street to the Arab Spring.

Digital tools such as YouTube, Twitter and Facebook have defined this year’s social movements by giving rise to a new generation of activism. In 2008, Barack Obama’s campaign was touted for its social media prowess. 2011′s stories of online mobilization share a common thread, differentiating them from the U.S. President’s election effort: grassroots organization by average individuals.

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Des bloggeurs arabes témoignent à Bruxelles : « Ce ne sont pas les médias sociaux qui ont fait la révolution, mais l’engagement réel des citoyens » by Alfred Mignot

Des bloggeurs arabes témoignent à Bruxelles : « Ce ne sont pas les médias sociaux qui ont fait la révolution, mais l’engagement réel des citoyens » by Alfred Mignot | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Organisée à l’initiative de Rodi Kratsa-Tsagaropoulou, vice-Présidente du Parlement européen et responsable pour la politique d’information et de communication, et des relations EuroMed, une rencontre a rassemblé à Bruxelles, les 29 et 30 novembre 2011, quelque 110 journalistes et bloggeurs des deux rives de la Méditerranée. L’une des conférences était consacrée au rôle des médias sociaux dans les Printemps arabes. Voici l’essentiel des témoignages des bloggeurs sud-méditerranéens…

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An Activist Stands Her Ground in Bahrain by Robert Mackey

An Activist Stands Her Ground in Bahrain by Robert Mackey | Twit4D | Scoop.it
During a protest in Bahrain on Saturday, an American journalist named Matthew Cassel reported on Twitter that he had just witnessed something remarkable: a lone female protester who refused to move as police officers in riot gear charged past her, firing tear gas shells just a few feet from her head.

A short time later, after a photograph and a brief video clip of the woman standing her ground in front of a line of police vehicles was uploaded to Twitter, readers of Mr. Cassel’s feed identified her as Zainab Alkhawaja, an activist whose own Angry Arabiya Twitter feed is devoted to documenting the protest movement in Bahrain.

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The Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted by Ramy Raoof

The Revolution Will Not Be Tweeted by Ramy Raoof | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Photo By: @RamyRaoof

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The Power of Social Media in Developing Nations by Amir Hatem Ali

The Power of Social Media in Developing Nations by Amir Hatem Ali | Twit4D | Scoop.it

On January 28, 2011, Egypt’s President, Hosni Mubarak, took the drastic and unprecedented step of shutting off the Internet for five days across
an entire nation. His reason for doing so was simple: to halt the flow of
communication and coordinated assembly taking place over social media
platforms, like Facebook and Twitter...

Permalink to the study: http://bit.ly/uJkjV3

 

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The Arab revolution: “We have a lot to learn from them” Jean-Pierre Filiu ITW

What are the main social dynamics of the waves of revolt in the Arab world in 2011? Jean-Pierre Filiu, scholar and author of "The Arab Revolution: Ten Lessons from the Democratic Uprising", discusses the question with Paul Hockenos.
Paul Hockenos: The social media played a key role across the Arab world in the upheavals of 2011, a theme you elaborate upon in your book The Arab Revolution. Why, then, do you caution not to exaggerate their importance?

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Mapping @TahrirSupplies by Nicola Hughes

Mapping @TahrirSupplies by Nicola Hughes | Twit4D | Scoop.it

One of our users I recently met in New York said ScraperWiki is “a great tool for hacktivism”. Because of this we have a lot of ‘hacktivists’ in our community. One such ‘hacktivist’ is Thomas Levine. He’s recently scraped @TahrirSupplies, a twitter account set up to crowd-source the need for suplies at Tahrir Square and matching them with availabilities in the surrounding area.

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Durex's sexist Twitter blunder by Bryony Whitehead

Durex's sexist Twitter blunder by Bryony Whitehead | Twit4D | Scoop.it
Durex South Africa made a sexist blunder on its Twitter account on Thursday that had a number of women's groups and other commentators up in arms.

The account "@DurexSA" had been tweeting jokes about sex during the day, but raised the ire of some South Africans with a number of questionable quips, including the following: "Why did God give men penises? So they'd have at least one way to shut a woman up" [sic].

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Colbenson - Presentación FICOD "Measuring Twitter Revolution"

Presentación de Colbenson Software Factory en FICOD 2011. Se presentaron las posibilidades de anticipar tendencias y acontecimientos mediante el análisis y p...
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Predictable Surprises: 10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard

Predictable Surprises:  10 International Crises and Social Media Revolutions You Can Bet on Between Now and 2015 by Philip N. Howard | Twit4D | Scoop.it

Between now and 2015, there will be some predictable crises in global politics. The most predictable political crises have become the moments in which dictators ask tech-savvy voters to participate in a rigged election. Social media allows people to call out big organized lies, so rigged elections have become sensitive moments in international politics. Since we know these moments are on their way, and both foreign policy makers and journalists act surprised when they arrive, we can call such moments "predictable surprises".

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