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China's one-child policy increasingly being questioned

China's one-child policy increasingly being questioned | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Decades ago, China decided it had too many people and instituted a policy that allowed most couples just one child. While the policy has been loosened some, it's still largely in place.


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Do you think it is time to revise China's One Child Policy?

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This map shows what the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine

This map shows what the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
In practical terms.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 25, 2014 6:51 PM

There are stated reasons and underlying reasons for political decision s. 

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 2014 10:24 PM

Unit IV

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Watch NYC Gentrify Right Before Your Eyes

Watch NYC Gentrify Right Before Your Eyes | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
New York City has always been changing. But recently, the city has seen a wave of luxury condos and artisanal cupcake boutiques uproot local delis and dive bars.

To make sure we don't forget the city's past, two New York-based photographers, James...

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:45 AM

unit 7

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:03 PM

APHG-U7

Molly McComb's curator insight, March 21, 4:16 PM

This shows the gentrification of New York City

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.

 

Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.


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The 10 Most and Least Developed Countries | PBS NewsHour | Nov. 2, 2011

The 10 Most and Least Developed Countries | PBS NewsHour | Nov. 2, 2011 | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
The 2011 Human Development Report ranked 187 countries according to income, education and health. We showcase the top five and bottom five on the list.

Via Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School, Mr. David Burton, Matthew Wahl
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Containerization Shaped Globalization

Sometimes a single unlikely idea can have massive impact across the world. Sir Harold Evans, the author of They Made America, describes how frustration drove...

 

The economies of scale that globalization depends on, relies on logistics and transportation networks that can handle this high-volume.  In a word, the container, as mundane as it may seem, facilitated the era within which we live today. 


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 1:58 PM

This video proves how a simple idea has the potential to change the world. The truck driver had the insight to notice when the current shipping system was not particularly effective and had the ingenuity to do something about it. Because of this man, containerization was allowed to change how goods could move around the world. As goods move, they also spread different cultures through food, ideas, technology, and beliefs. Without this process, globalization would not be at the level that it exists at today. . 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 7, 2014 5:26 PM

I always enjoyed TED videos. What really struck me was the opening sentence of the video, "everything is everywhere these days." This is so true in so many ways. The video uses different examples that you can find in different stores from places all over the world. How many things can you could in your bedroom that says "Made in China" or some other place other than the US? This is very common as we all know. Products and goods come from all over the world and even over seas. This is a process that we call globalization. However, the video introduces a process called containerization. This process saves an ample amount of time for the workers. The process was a success. "shrinking the world and enlarging human choice."

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 7:48 PM

Globalization has connected the world in such a way that we hadn't thought possible. This idea has created rising economies all over the world and has made transport of goods and services move faster and continues to increase this rate with advances in technology. Containerization is a staple of globalization and without it, none of these products would be able to get from country to country. In essence it has developed the world of import and exports. To add to this success, globalization has also created jobs and communities which revolve heavily around the transport of goods. It saves time by using massive containers to move goods and it creates opportunities in places where it had not been possible before. 

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Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave?

Out of Africa – Did the Colonial Powers ever Really Leave? | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Africa may have achieved independence, but the old colonial ties are still important as France’s decision to send troops to Mali to fight Islamist extremists shows.

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:04 PM

Colony powers are still located within Africa. Just because Africa is technically independent doesn't mean that British Colonial power isn't still in place.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:11 PM

unit 4

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 26, 11:08 AM

This article reminds us all of the growth-stunt that colonialism in Africa brought to the continent.  It is not surprising to see that most African countries still depend heavily on their old colonial masters for survival.  People who may casually follow African politics might think that colonialism started with the Berlin Conference and ended in 1990 or so, but one could argue that it hasn't ended due to the urgent dependency African countries still have on their old colonizers.  Africa might be the most beautiful continent in the world but has the worst story of any in the world.

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Lady In Black: 'Burka Avenger' Fights For Pakistan's Girls

Lady In Black: 'Burka Avenger' Fights For Pakistan's Girls | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burqa-clad superhero.

Via Seth Dixon
Avonna Swartz's insight:

What do you think of this? Do you think it will have an impact on how women perceive themselves?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:18 AM

In the new animated series, Burka Avenger, we see intriguing blend of cultures. Globalization does NOT mean that all cultures will become the same.  As one geographer said, globalization isn't making all places perfectly flat since it is incredibly bumpy.  This NPR podcast shows how the globalization and pop culture can take highly localized and distinct regional twists on common themes.   This video trailer shows how a school teacher fights for educational rights for girls when cloaked under the burka.

Luisa Pinto's curator insight, August 5, 2013 5:32 AM

Globalização não quer dizer que vamos todos ficar iguais. Nem podia. 

Taryn Coxall's curator insight, August 5, 2013 9:58 PM

"the Burka Avenger" is a new cartoon aired in pakistan aiming to empower pakistani women who wear burkas.

I think this clip is a great resourse for not only empowering pakistani women and girls but to use within the Australian classroom in order to not only expose students to different cultures entertainment but more specifically look at rasism, stereotyoes and different cultures traditons in a fun and enagaging way

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Buffalo Continues Population Slide | wgrz.com

Buffalo Continues Population Slide | wgrz.com | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

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Avonna Swartz's insight:

How does this article illustrate internal migration patterns occuring in the US?

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KochAPGeography's curator insight, May 23, 2013 1:47 PM

Which is the best application of this article?  Is it deindustrialization? Urban to urban migration?  The continued growth of U.S. population in the South?

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A Call for English Only at the EU, and 5-Word Acceptance Speeches | @pritheworld

A Call for English Only at the EU, and 5-Word Acceptance Speeches | @pritheworld | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
With 23 official languages-- rising to 24 in July-- the European Union is knee-deep in translation. Must every document be translated into Latvian and Irish? Or should the EU simplify matters by making English its working language?

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Cornstalks Everywhere But Nothing Else, Not Even A Bee : NPR

Cornstalks Everywhere But Nothing Else, Not Even A Bee : NPR | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

You can go to almost any cubic foot of ocean, stream, coral, backyard, ice shelves even, and if you look, you'll find scores of little animals and plants busy making a living.

This provides an interesting look at the way commercial agriculture impacts biodiversity. Being from Iowa, I have a good sense of the importance of agriculture to the state's economic well-being, but is the cost of giant yields truly worth the "biological desert?"


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Girls 'hit hard by world recession'

Girls 'hit hard by world recession' | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
A shrinking world economy is painful for many, but girls and women suffer most from the effects of recession.

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012.Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."


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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:52 PM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:45 PM

unit 6 economic development

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2:55 PM

This is really hard to see. Children shouldn't have a hard journey getting to school to get an education and better their lives. These photos are from ten places around the world with the most dangerous journeys to school. This isn't a topic that even comes to mind because many of us living in the United States have had the luxury of being driven to school or riding a bus and we take that simple drive for granted. One of the photos is from Indonesia where students have to cross a collapsing bridge to get to school. The image shows them hanging on for dear life while trying not to fall in the water underneath them. There was a flood that broke the pillar holding this bridge up and it was never fixed after that. What happens when that bridge fully collapses? There needs to be a better way to get these kids to school. These children shouldn't have to suffer with getting their education for situations that are out of their control. 

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Urban Morphology in Mexico City

Urban Morphology in Mexico City | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"Mexico City is a giant laboratory of urban morphology. Its 20 million residents live in neighborhoods based on a wide spectrum of plans.  The colonial center (above) was built on the foundations of Tenochtitlan, capital of the Aztec empire. The old city was on an island in Lake Texcoco. The lake was drained to prevent flooding as the city expanded.


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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 10:20 PM

The images that show the various parts of Mexican neighborhoods are examples that the urban morphology is a diverse as the different levels of income and society.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2:22 PM

Mexico City has grown so fast that city planners have a dilemma on their hands; what to do to maximize real estate utilizing the available real estate and somehow building enough homes to support this mega-city of 20 million people.

They have faced numerous hurdles including draining a lake that used to flood the city every year to using geometry in their favor. Some of these areas are gridded much like New York City, while some are used to fit as many people as possible into one area. Seems geometry plays a bigger role than one might think initially. Where rivers, streams and other natural resources exist they are used for the wealthy, while the poor suffer the indignation of homogenous lines, look alike homes, and squared plots.

The satellite photos are beautiful in their simplicity but show a much more detailed explanation for the way Mexico City has been laid out. One positive dynamic is that urban sprawl is being kept to a minimum or as much a minimum that 20 million people can occupy. This should help with services like electricity, water, gas/oil and other utilities and keep the relative costs down. This should provide affordable basics for the poor and wealthy alike.

The red stripes that run through the photos are of street markets that serve as a bit of an informal economy for the areas. This helps the area merchants, while unfortunately keeping the poor, just that way as taxes are not collected on their goods that ultimately could help fund programs that would help these people climb out of poverty.

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, April 6, 7:36 PM

Mexico Urban Metropolis

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European word translator

European word translator | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

“Translate any word from English to more than 30 other European languages, on a map”


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Mr. Gresham's curator insight, April 7, 2014 4:09 PM

APHUG, have fun with this!

 

#greski

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:43 AM

unit 3

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The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene

The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
84% of Americans are unable to locate Ukraine on a world map; those that can't are more likely to support military intervention.

Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 7, 2014 12:10 PM

As I've said before, a more informed, geo-literate citizenry helps to strengthen U.S. foreign policy and diplomatic efforts because they have a spatial framework within which to organize political, environmental, cultural and economic information.  National Geographic recently also produced a video showing how geo-education is important for business professionals as a part of their geo-education community (if you haven't already, join!).  This is one way to combat geographic ignorance.

David R. Perry's curator insight, April 7, 2014 11:38 PM

Beyond sad.

Rach Brick's curator insight, April 13, 2014 10:45 PM

This says so much about ignorance and aggression... Do they even know that they'd have to come up with a catchy name because the Crimea has already got a war names after it?

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10 Disney Songs Sung In The Characters' Native Tongues

10 Disney Songs Sung In The Characters' Native Tongues | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
If Disney characters were real, they wouldn't be singing in English. Here are 10 classic songs as they were meant to be heard -- maybe.

Via Matthew Wahl
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Writing FRQs

"AP Human Geography Free Response Questions should be approached in a very deliberate and specific way. APHG teacher Tom Landon explains his approach to teaching students how to do it."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 11, 2013 3:10 PM

For those preparing students for the AP Human Geography test, this video gives great advice to help you instruct students on how to approach the Free Response Questions (FRQs).  Understanding the content always comes first, but some bright students who I know understand the content fail to read the instructions or to answer every portion of the questions.  This will help those APHG students.


TagsAPHG, training, geography education.

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:50 PM

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

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The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart

The Middle East, explained in one (sort of terrifying) chart | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

"What could be simpler than the Middle East? A well-known Egyptian blogger who writes under the pseudonym The Big Pharaoh put together this chart laying out the region’s rivalries and alliances. He’s kindly granted me permission to post it, so that Americans might better understand the region. The joke is that it’s not a joke; this is actually pretty accurate."


Via Seth Dixon
Avonna Swartz's insight:

Interesting and (as it says) terrifying.

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, August 28, 2013 6:10 AM

Le Moyen Orient actuel, les relations entre les acteurs des conflits,  expliqué à travers un organigramme. 

BandKids13-14's comment, August 28, 2013 9:50 AM
Did anyone else notice that both Al Qaeda and the U.S. are FOR syria rebels, and against Assad?
Todd Parsons's curator insight, September 2, 2013 10:06 AM

So we should have peace in the Middle East in maybe 7.59 billion years when the sun goes all red giant and we all burn up anyway. However, in the meantime...check out this cool chart of friends and foes. It all makes sense now, yah?

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China's one-child policy increasingly being questioned

China's one-child policy increasingly being questioned | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

Decades ago, China decided it had too many people and instituted a policy that allowed most couples just one child. While the policy has been loosened some, it's still largely in place.


Via KochAPGeography
Avonna Swartz's insight:

Do you think it is time to revise China's One Child Policy?

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The Rise of Megacities

The Rise of Megacities | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
By 2025, the developing world will be home to 29 megacities.

 

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 

 

Tags: urban, megacities.


Via Seth Dixon, Kristen McDaniel, KochAPGeography
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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 19, 2012 10:27 AM
If that's what is predicted for 2025, how populated will our world be by 2050? Scary to think about.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 16, 2013 12:28 PM

Through this interactive mapping feature with rich call-out boxes, the reader can explore the latest UN estimates and forecasts on the growth of megacities (urban areas with over 10 million residents).  These 'cities on steroids' have been growing tremendously since the 1950s and present a unique set of geographic challenges and opportunities for their residents. 


Download the data yourself as a CSV file and your can import this into ArcGIS online and symbolize your map with any of the columns in the dataset.  


Tags: urban, megacities.


Peter Steffan's curator insight, October 9, 2013 5:00 PM

Very cool!

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Outspoken 12-year-old in India shows country's shift role for women

Outspoken 12-year-old in India shows country's shift role for women | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it

In conservative parts of India, women were expected to be shy, and reserved -- seen, and not heard. But that's changing, as more girls become educated and aspire to independence. And 12-year-old Sarita Meena is the embodiment of that change.


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China acknowledges 'cancer villages'

China acknowledges 'cancer villages' | TWHS AP Human Geography | Scoop.it
China's environment ministry appears to have acknowledged the existence of so-called "cancer villages", after years of public speculation about the impact of pollution in certain areas.

Via KochAPGeography
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KochAPGeography's curator insight, February 24, 2013 11:30 AM

Routinely mentioned is the rapid growth of China's economic influence in global business, alongside Beijing's political clout. Often overlooked, however, are the consequences of this rapid development, such as the spike in cancer cases and cancer as a leading cause of death.