TV Everywhere
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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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New Challenges Chip Away at Cable’s Pillar of Profit

New Challenges Chip Away at Cable’s Pillar of Profit | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
A future where consumers will be able to assemble an à la carte menu of entertainment suddenly seems much closer.
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

"I’m looking forward to the day when I can buy only what I want to watch, or eat, without economic penalty. In other words, no, I do not want fries with that"

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NBC Olympics Unveils Streaming Plans for Sochi

NBC Olympics Unveils Streaming Plans for Sochi | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

"...NBC Olympics has continued its efforts to streamline the authentication process with new abilities like In-home auto-verification for some cable/telco customers, cross-domain verification with Adobe Pass, and a longer verification window for users."

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Comcast’s thePlatform Nails Up ‘Virtual TV Framework’

Comcast’s thePlatform Nails Up ‘Virtual TV Framework’ | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

"The company said it is implementing the update, which envisions a blending of TV and the Web, because decreasing delivery costs coupled with the inexorable shift to IP and cloud-based video delivery systems are expected to alter the distribution model dramatically over the next five years.

Today, TV Everywhere is disjointed in that only part of a customer’s set-top-based video service experience is typically available on other screens in or out of the home. Some MSO-developed TV Everywhere apps offer a subset of the live TV lineup or just a portion of the pay TV provider’s VOD service, while others offer only access to an authenticated, multiscreen VOD library. Several programmers, meanwhile, have developed their own TV Everywhere apps that tend to vary in terms of capability and function..."

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Why Cord Cutting May Be A False Flag for The Future of TV

Why Cord Cutting May Be A False Flag for The Future of TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...Defining television as video content you watch in one specific environment or using one particular method (while online video content is some unknowable “other”) creates a line of demarcation that gets hazy when you consider a show like Arrested Development, which jumped between the two relatively intact. As author Warren Ellis recently wrote, “I think it’s worth admitting, now, that ‘television’ has become one of those legacy words, like ‘phone,’ that we use to point at a thing, without really fully describing it. It certainly doesn’t mean what it used to.”

“We don’t actually believe there is such a thing as digital video. It’s all just TV,” said Jon Heller, co-founder and co-CEO of FreeWheel, which works with companies to monetize content within the new media space. “No one buys kitchen television, in terms of advertising, the same way that they don’t buy living room television or bedroom television. It is all just TV.” The difference, he says, is that the audience now has more choices about when and where they watch, and the television industry needs to figure out how to deal with that diffusion.

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Executives concede TV isn’t everywhere

Executives concede TV isn’t everywhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

"TV was supposed to be everywhere by now – watchable anytime, anywhere, on your smartphone or tablet. But four years into the industry’s effort, network executives readily admit: TV isn’t everywhere.

The promise of “TV Everywhere” has been a key strategy in the cable and satellite TV industry’s fight to retain customers in the face of challenges from online video providers such as Netflix.

With TV Everywhere, customers who pay for packages with hundreds of television channels are supposed to be able to watch them on mobile devices and computers as well for no extra charge. That perk is meant to make pay TV packages seem more worthwhile and keep customers from defecting.

Yet many rights deals still haven’t been worked out. More important, audience measurement firms have been slow to count viewing on mobile devices, so advertisers have been reluctant to pay as much for commercials on phones and tablets compared with television sets.

“We either don’t get any credit at all, or if we do get credit it’s at a fraction of what we would have gotten if they first watched it live on the TV,” Ron Lamprecht, NBCUniversal’s executive vice president for digital distribution, said during a panel at The Cable Show, an industry conference this week.

This gap in ad revenue has created a kind of chicken-and-egg scenario. Networks and pay TV providers aren’t able to offer as many shows online because they don’t want to spend too much for rights without knowing they can make their money back. So, viewers can’t reliably find their favorite shows online and don’t use the services much."

Peter Rosenberg's insight:

Having attended the panel discussion referenced in the article, here are my key takeaways (combined with some editorial insight ;-)

 

Universally accepted viewer measuremt across all platforms is essential to driving a level monetization comparable to the traditional/current "big screen" model.  The content availability (and consumers) will follow.  As Ron Lamprecht (NBC Universal) noted “We either don’t get any credit at all, or if we do get credit it’s at a fraction of what we would have gotten if they first watched it live on the TV”.

 

Usability for consumers is still problamatic, especially regarding the authentication process.  While in-home "auto-authentication" by MVPDs able to leverage the identity of the cable modem helps, there are still significant obstacles for users who do not know or remember their credentials. Marcien Jenckes (Comcast) mentioned that Comcast was evaluating the possiblity of leveraging Facebook for TVE logins - an approach I have advocated for some time.  (Synacor now offers Social Login for TVE to its customers.) A device registration process will be critical to enabling secure authentication - especially outside the home.  Some of these issues are currently being discussed and/or addressed in the OATC (http://oatc.us/) Usability Working Group.

 

Public understanding & perception of TVE is also an issue.  As Jeremy Legg (Turner) noted, it is a "project not a product".

 

Discoverabilityand availability of content was also raised as problamatic.  The average consumer does not understand why they can watch content on some devices & places but not others, nor is there an intuitive way for them to discover where and on which platform the content they want to watch is available.  That there are complex rights & contractual issues at play is not something that is easily understood or communicated to the viewer.

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Growing pains: Auto login driving advances in TV Everywhere authentication

Growing pains: Auto login driving advances in TV Everywhere authentication | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Comcast saw a backlash from both TV critics and subscribers in 2009, when its first TV Everywhere service, Fancast Xfinity Online, debuted.
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

Social login, cross-domain authentication, and in-home or trusted device based authentication will prove essential to improving TVE usability and driving user adoption.  

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Nitin Narang's comment, May 8, 2013 1:29 PM
Will further need access outside the home network and extended content catalogs
Isabelle Bourekeb's curator insight, May 9, 2013 7:16 AM
Nightmare for security but a must have for smooth customer experience...
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Fox's Brennan: TV Everywhere 'is probably our most important online strategy'

Fox's Brennan: TV Everywhere 'is probably our most important online strategy' | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

Sherry Brennan: "We see that people who stream the most also watch the most TV. And the people who watch the least TV also are the people who stream the least. And so we saw this in video on demand 10 or 15 years ago and also in the premium TV market, like HBO: People who like video content and like to consume it, continue to like to consume more of it in more places. So those people are not going away from platform A to watch on platform B, although I do think there will be some shifting of where people watch time-shifted programming, away from DVRs and towards devices as TV Everywhere proliferates. But that's not really cannibalization, that's platform shifting."

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Despite Media Companies’ Best Efforts, ‘TV Everywhere’ Is Nowhere

Despite Media Companies’ Best Efforts, ‘TV Everywhere’ Is Nowhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

People are streaming online video more than ever before but only 17% of pay TV subscribers have watched cable programming online using so-called “TV Everywhere” services, according to a new study. The study, from research firm GfK Media, is the latest bad news for big media companies’ TV Everywhere initiative, which is aimed at reinforcing the value of traditional cable subscriptions. But since its launch four years ago, the effort has been plagued by delays in launch as a result of difficult rights negotiations between various entertainment companies and pay TV operators – cable, satellite and phone companies.

Peter Rosenberg's insight:

A key point from the article:  "...One of the main issues that has been separating entertainment companies and pay TV providers is the question of which will deal directly with consumers, traditionally the province of providers. While providers like Comcast have made a big push to make content available online through their own website or apps – in Comcast’s case, Xfinity — channels like ESPN, Time Warner’s HBO and CNN have their own individual apps and websites with TV programming content. Those give consumers a direct relationship with channels they haven’t traditionally had."

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Is a Tablet the Only TV You Need?

Is a Tablet the Only TV You Need? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...While planting your face in front of a tiny screen is perfectly acceptable on trans-Atlantic flights, it can be a little odd at home. But if you give yourself over to the tablet, it's actually a pretty awesome experience. I'm not claiming an iPad beats the big screen, but I will say this: Watching shows and movies on a tablet feels closer to what television viewing should be like in the 21st century than what 21st-century TVs actually deliver.  Yes, there are "smart" televisions that come with Wi-Fi and video-streaming services like Netflix and Hulu Plus baked in, but they feel sluggish compared to tablets. Devices that help bridge the gap between Internet-based content and your living room's television, like Apple TV and the Xbox 360, are pretty excellent, but once you've become accustomed to the speed and intimacy of using something like an iPad to watch your shows and films, it's hard to deal with tech that's not as responsive. Even simple things on a tablet, like briskly flicking through a menu of movies or accurately rewinding with the tip of your finger, can be pleasurable. As the gadgets in our pockets and handbags and briefcases become the most impressive technological objects in our lives, the good ol' TV setups in our homes can feel painfully slow and antiquated.  And what these futuristic slates lack in eye-popping bigness, they make up for in deft portability. Want to watch "Monday Night Football" in your backyard for a more tailgate-like experience? You can do that. Spouse kick you off the big screen to watch "Glee?" Grab the tablet and head to the attic. The tablet can be a marriage saver in one-television households. It's also the best thing to happen to lazy Sunday mornings since breakfast in bed...

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Cable Biz Struggles with Divergent Online Strategies

Cable Biz Struggles with Divergent Online Strategies | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...Welcome to the byzantine world of in-season digital syndication, where the inconsistencies that confuse viewers are just as frustrating to distribution execs at top cablers. "If the industry could move faster to establish some kind of uniformity across the board, I think it would absolutely change how programmers would window content in the free, on-demand space," said Denise Denson, exec VP of content distribution and marketing at MTV Networks.  What is delaying the multichannel TV world is a complex web of vested interests ranging from the cable and satellite operators that dictate most of the distribution parameters for programming to the studios that hold onto some of the rights to the content they license to the networks. Then there are the varying off-air marketing strategies, not to mention just old-fashioned indecision.  Programmers face a tough balancing act here. On the one hand, they don't want to cannibalize the aud for premiere telecasts, reruns and even DVR playback within the first three days when advertising revenue is earned. Cablers also need to protect their relationships with operators that pay them a fortune in carriage fees.  On the other hand, programmers want to maximize the exposure of their shows in ways that can drive ratings back to on-air, dilute the appeal of piracy and capitalize on the momentum of online video in general.

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Pay-TV industry not united on TV Everywhere

Pay-TV industry not united on TV Everywhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...differing approaches illustrate a divide in the media industry over how best to put content on the Web while also keeping customers hooked to their TVs.  In 2009, cable giant Comcast Corp.and Time Warner — parent of TNT, TBS, HBO and other popular channels — unveiled TV Everywhere, an initiative that was to be a blueprint for the pay-TV industry to develop a platform to let subscribers watch content on their computers, phones or tablets. The proposition was simple enough: Take all that is good about television — lots of channels at the click of a button — and transfer it online.  The hope was that by offering subscribers more content online, people would be less likely to cut the cord to their cable or satellite TV service in favor of so-called over the top services such as Netflix, Hulu and Roku. TV Everywhere was also meant to discourage programmers from giving away their shows for free online.  But in the three years since it was conceived, TV Everywhere has struggled to gain traction.  "It's simply a mess," BTIG media analyst Rich Greenfield said. "A complete and utter failure."  Andy Heller, vice chairman and TV Everywhere point person for Time Warner's Turner Broadcasting, believes "the real stumbling block has been deals." Some programmers and distributors, Heller said, are using TV Everywhere contract talks as an excuse to try to "change terms and conditions" of other contracts.  Another problem is that neither the programmers nor the pay-TV providers can decide who should be the gatekeeper for content online. Some consumers have to register at multiple networks to watch content, while others can do one-stop shopping through their distributor.  "We're trying to figure out, can you have a single access point?" said Mike Hopkins, president of distribution for Fox Networks. "It's technically complicated but not impossible."

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Synacor Targets App Economy With Carbyn's HTML5 System

Synacor, a provider of Web portal and TV Everywhere solutions, is promising to make it easier for cable operators, content owners and others to publish device-independent apps with an upcoming platform based on the HTML5 standard.  The company's HTML5 strategy is based on technology it obtained with the $1.1 million acquisition of eight-person Canadian startup Carbyn in January. The idea: to help deliver a unified experience for apps across Internet-connected devices including smartphones, tablets, laptops and connected TVs without having to tailor discrete apps for each individual device type.  "With Carbyn, you develop one HTML5 app and that can live inside one platform," said Jaafer Haidar, Carbyn's co-founder and CEO, is now vice president of mobile for Synacor.  Synacor is initially approaching existing customers, including Verizon Communications, Charter Communications and CenturyLink, about the HTML5 offering. The company plans to show off the Carbyn system at the 2012 Cable Show in Boston next month and is aiming to launch it commercially by the end of 2012. The pricing model for the hosted HTML5 app service has yet to be determined, Haidar said. It could be based on search and advertising revenue, or based on number of active users.  Apps that can run on the Carbyn platform include self-service apps for MSOs that provide "my account" features, bill payment, DVR management, voicemail and other functions, or a range of apps developed by programmers to deliver content, Haidar said. The Carbyn system's features include push notifications and app-to-app communications, and Synacor plans to publish application programming interfaces (APIs) to let third-party developers can take advantage of it.  "The base value of this platform is, we can deliver apps and content to your consumers across any HTML5 device," Haidar said. "Everybody shares the need to become device-agnostic."

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OATC Announces "Online Multimedia Authorization Protocol"

OATC Announces "Online Multimedia Authorization Protocol" | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...The OMAP specification will benefit stakeholders in the online subscription content ecosystem:

-- Multimedia content publishers and distributors will reduce unauthorized access to content, share a common architecture to minimize operational overhead and cost and provide consumers with
standardized, secure access to media content over the Internet using their home and mobile devices and client software.

-- Technology vendors and third-party service providers can develop value-added services and commercial solutions to deploy across the entire subscription content ecosystem.

-- Consumers get choice, convenience and a simple and consistent experience, unlike today's proprietary solutions.

"OATC [Open Authentication Technology Committee] is creating the open standards needed to enable simple online access to subscription TV services by bridging the gaps in existing technology with practical and workable solutions," said Glenn Reitmeier, OATC president. "We are very excited to announce this preview of our first of several standards to come that will help MVPDs and programmers give their subscribers more choices than ever before." The OATC is inviting the public to download (http://www.oatc.us/Standards/Download.aspx ) the draft specification and provide comments by May 4, 2012.

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Tryphoon's comment, April 6, 2012 7:04 PM
We're co-authors!
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aioTV Joins OATC Effort to Enable Internet Access to Subscription TV

aioTV Joins OATC Effort to Enable Internet Access to Subscription TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Denver, Colorado (PRWEB) January 21, 2014 -- The media industry organization OATC (Open Authentication Technology Committee) and aioTV will focus on enabling TV content for delivery in all locations.
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

“OATC’s effort to bridge the technology gap in this fragmented world of IP aligns our approach for single sign-on and more importantly normalized meta-data across content owners to truly leverage IP delivered opportunities,”

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MediaPost Publications TV Everywhere Clicks, Authenticated Video Views Soar 217% 12/04/2013

TV Everywhere Clicks, Authenticated Video Views Soar 217% - 12/04/2013
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

"...programmers are finally figuring out how to bring TV experiences to viewers across all devices and monetize at the same time."

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Hulu Plans to Hook Subscription Service Into Google Chromecast

Hulu Plans to Hook Subscription Service Into Google Chromecast | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

"...Hulu won’t be able to easily stop users of Google’s new Chromecast from using the “cast” feature to stream Hulu.com video from a Chrome browser tab to a TV. But that’s not a big deal —  it’s effectively equivalent to connecting your computer to the TV via HDMI, which the website has never been able to prevent. Rather, expect Hulu to emphasize that it is enhancing its iOS and Android apps to take advantage of the native capabilities of the Chromecast device, for smoother playback and better remote-control capabilities and browsing."

Peter Rosenberg's insight:

File under: "If you can't beat 'em, join them."

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Google’s Chromecast Lets You Watch TV on the Web on Your TV. Guess Who Doesn’t Like That?

Google’s Chromecast Lets You Watch TV on the Web on Your TV. Guess Who Doesn’t Like That? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

"...Of course, anyone with any common sense, who doesn’t work in legal or biz dev at a large entertainment company, knows that it’s silly to argue that something that’s on one screen shouldn’t be on another. And anyone who wants to buy a cable and connect their laptop to their TV could already do this.

Which is exactly what Ossama Alami, a manager in Google’s developer relations group, told my colleague Liz Gannes when she asked him about the issue today.

There is one solution for content owners who don’t want people using Chromecast to fling stuff to their sets, Alami noted: Stop distributing their stuff on the Chrome browser. Not that he’s suggesting they should do that.

It’s worth noting that this move comes as Google is floating the notion of an “over the top” pay-TV solution, and talking to content owners and networks about licensing their stuff. And it comes after Google has already irked some content owners with earlier versions of Google TV, supposedly because Google didn’t work hard enough to keep pirated content off of those devices.

You’d think that if Google were serious about its latest TV push, it would take extra care not to ruffle the TV guys’ feathers. So maybe it doesn’t think this is a ruffle-worthy issue. Or maybe it just doesn’t care."

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TV Everywhere Is Top Of Everyone's Mind | TVNewsCheck.com

TV Everywhere Is Top Of Everyone's Mind | TVNewsCheck.com | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
So far, TV Everywhere has been mostly a video-on-demand service, a way for subscribers to cherry pick their favorite shows to watch on second screens.
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

A robust cross platform measurement system with industry wide acceptance will be the key to driving content availability.

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Synacor Cloud ID Social Login Continues Momentum As Customers Launch The Service

Service Providers Including Midcontinent Now Offer Synacor's First-Of-Its-Kind Social Login, Providing Access to Online pay-TV Content Through Social Accounts Like Facebook, Twitter or Google
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

TV Everywhere adoption has been hampered by usability issues and the "friction" created by multiple login processes.  Here is a step in the right direction.

From the article: "Social Login gives Synacor customers the flexibility to offer subscribers access to online pay-TV content with their favorite social accounts like Facebook, Twitter or Google. The offering simultaneously authorizes with the subscriber's pay-TV provider or billing account. Synacor Cloud ID brings the convenience of Social Login to TV Everywhere consumers with the trust of entitlement verification for TV authorization."

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» ‘TV Everywhere’ Ready for Live Linear!

» ‘TV Everywhere’ Ready for Live Linear! | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

"Though consumers have been slow to warm to ‘TV Everywhere’ services, a new TDG white paper suggests that adding live linear access to the mix would drive widespread use of the service, enhance operator value, and even generate new incremental revenue. The white paper, Bringing Multiscreen Live Linear Programming to Operator ‘TV Everywhere’, discusses TDG’s new research in detail, and presents a convincing case as to why incumbent pay-TV operators should add live linear broadband distribution to their TVE offerings."

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Cable companies ordered to support HD content streaming within homes by 2014

Cable companies ordered to support HD content streaming within homes by 2014 | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The FCC has ordered cable operators (and TiVo) to update their cable boxes to include support for HD streaming over home networks to devices like PCs, smart TVs, and tablets. In addition to video streaming, cable boxes must also allow HD video recording on external devices through home networks. By June 2nd 2014 the vast majority of set top boxes will have to support an open standard, although cable companies with fewer than 400,000 subscribers have been given an extra three months to implement the changes.  The commission originally ordered cable companies to support network-based streaming back in 2010, but TiVo protested the order saying "if each cable operator deploys set-top boxes with its own understanding of an open industry standard, the result may be an outcome that is neither standard nor open." The FCC has now clarified that an open standard should enable companies to work together without consultation, explaining that video streaming should work even if the cable company and (for example) PC manufacturer have never had any contact with each other.

Both the FCC and Verizon have cited the successor to the DLNA Premium Video Profile, which should be agreed upon at some point next year, as an example of a compliant protocol that cable companies could adopt. In order for the standard to comply, it must support "recordable high-definition video, closed captioning data, service discovery, video transport, and remote control command pass-through."  It'll be down to each company to choose the standard they want to use, but whatever happens, customers should be free to watch (and record) their cable TV content on any household device they choose.

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ken nelson's curator insight, December 18, 2012 9:25 PM

humm...mabye dlna clients for mobile devcies in the home could be a new form/source of ad revenue

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Time Warner Cable: How about some TV with your Netflix?

Time Warner Cable: How about some TV with your Netflix? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Tail, meet dog: Time Warner Cable is currently sending a mailer to internet-only customers, suggesting that they should upgrade their broadband speeds for a better Netflix experience and offering to throw in a whole year of free TV as a bonus.  How about some TV with your Netflix? Time Warner Cable’s latest mailer to Internet-only customers.  Why is this remarkable? Because not too long ago, cable companies viewed TV services as their main money maker and broadband as an added service. The Time Warner Cable offer doesn’t just turn this model on its head, it also puts the focus squarely on Netflix as one of the main reasons people would want fast internet access.  Of course, Netflix has been blamed by some in the industry as a reason why people would cut the cord and go internet-only in the first place. For these cord cutters, an ad like this may actually be a smart thing: Instead of making them feel like they’re subscribing to an expensive TV bundle, Time Warner Cable is putting the emphasis squarely on Netflix, a service Internet-only users likely already enjoy...

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London 2012 — NBC Signup Needed to Stream Olympics

London 2012 — NBC Signup Needed to Stream Olympics | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

This edition of the Summer Games promises to be different from past Olympics, and it might be a real boon for viewers. Every stream from every sport from London will be live. There will be no dilly-dallying as there was two years ago at the Vancouver Winter Games when NBC streamed only hockey and curling live on its site. But as usual, the opening and closing ceremonies will be tape-delayed until prime time. In all, there will be 3,500 hours of live streaming video. Few will watch them all (is it possible, I wonder?), but they will be there. Still, whatever you watch, at whatever time, you will want to be able to dip into it without encountering any access problems. “Sure, we have fears that people who are asked to take an action, to click for access, are going to be deterred,” said Gary Zenkel, the president of NBC Olympics. “We learned two years ago that the consumer needs more education.” He said customers have, over that time, learned to verify their accounts for other content.

“A portion of the population is getting comfortable,” he added.

Verification (or authorization) should be easy and quick. It looks simple in the short demonstration video starring Carson Daly that NBC has sent to cable, satellite and telephone company providers: Go to nbcolympics.com /LiveExtra. From a drop-down menu, choose the cable, satellite or telephone company you have an account with. The next step depends on where you subscribe (and if you’re on a digital tier that includes MSNBC and CNBC, which is nearly everyone’s). Generally, you will have to enter the user name and password that corresponds to your account to verify your computer, mobile device or tablet. If all works well, you will never have to verify again. But Comcast and Cablevision have developed ways to speed the process. When Comcast Xfinity and Cablevision Optimum broadband customers identify themselves on the NBC Olympic site from their home computers, their accounts will be recognized and automatically verified without the entering of user names and passwords. “We wanted to create a frictionless environment and remove obstacles to let them get to the Olympic content,” said Amalia O’Sullivan, Cablevision’s vice president for broadband product operations. “We know that for a very condensed period time, and for a broad base of customers, there would be great interest in this product.”...

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NBC, Adobe App to Live-Stream Olympic Games

NBC, Adobe App to Live-Stream Olympic Games | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Olympic Games are weeks away, and NBC is teaming up with Adobe for two apps that will provide easy access to game details as well as live streaming from London.  The free Adobe AIR-powered apps - NBC Olympics Live Extra and NBC Olympics - are now available for iOS and Android. The first will allow for live streaming of more than 3,500 hours of Olympic content, while the second provides more indepth details about the athlethes, the games, and more.  In a nod to the TV Everywhere model, access to the "vast majority" of streaming content will be limited to U.S. users with a pay TV subscription. In order to watch, users will be asked to sign in with their cable login, whether that is Time Warner Cable, Comcast, Cablevision, or a smaller regional provider.  Ashley Still, director of product management for Video Solutions at Adobe, said that 97 percent of all households that pay for TV can access the live streaming content. If you're at home and also get Internet access via your TV provider, the app will automatically recognize that you are allowed to watch the live streaming content.  Those who don't currently have a login for their cable provider can contact the company; NBC has a list of contact numbers on its website. The same authentication can be used across multiple devices...

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Why ‘TV Everywhere’Still Isn't Everywhere

No one disagrees that the next generation of TV must span multiple devices and deliver content wherever people want it. But a gulf remains between those who believe the industry risks being left behind as consumer viewing habits shift, and those who argue that a workable economic model must be firmly in place from the get-go. There’s an underlying tension about who, ultimately, controls the customer experience — and about how to make money in an anytime, anywhere, any-device world.

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