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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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HBO Go Now Playing On Samsung TVs, But Not For Comcast And TWC

HBO Go Now Playing On Samsung TVs, But Not For Comcast And TWC | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

HBO's "TV Everywhere" service is now available on Samsung's Internet-connected HDTVs -- but customers of Comcast and Time Warner Cable can't access the feature today.  The two biggest U.S. cable operators also block access to HBO Go on Roku's Internet set-tops, while they do allow subscribers to access the service via PCs, Apple iPads and mobile phones.  Meanwhile, DirecTV is allowing customers to log in to HBO Go on Samsung TVs, but like Comcast and TWC the satellite TV company hasn't given the green light to Roku. DirecTV did not immediately provide an explanation for why the Samsung TVs are OK but the Roku boxes are not.  According to sources familiar with Comcast and Time Warner Cable's positions, HBO has not yet agreed to all of the conditions the MSOs require of their TV Everywhere partners, such as how subscriber information is handled on third-party devices and websites... 

On Time Warner Inc.'s Feb. 8 earnings call, CEO Jeff Bewkes urged the industry to make cable content available on as many devices as possible -- as quickly as possible.  "Frankly, I don't understand the reticence of distributors to authenticate on third-party sites like Roku and get HBO and TNT and all of those channels to television," Bewkes said. "As a general principle, we, as an industry, should be making viewers have availability with on-demand TV of all of their favorite networks on any platform, any device that they want to use. ... That's how you fulfill the promise of your brands and of television to viewers. And I'm hopeful that the industry will move pretty quickly past some of its -- I think their more minor concerns that they have, and they ought to speed up."

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Internet TV On The Rise: Roku Hits 15 Million Channel Downloads

Internet TV On The Rise: Roku Hits 15 Million Channel Downloads | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Internet TV platform Roku announced today that it has reached 15 million channel downloads from the more than one million people on its service. Roku's growth has been spurred by its expanding selection of entertainment channels and the company's recent move into U.S. retail stores. Roku is simple and as a platform it is cheap. There are three options available ranging from $59.99 to $99.99 and consumers pay for the subscriptions they use through it, like Netflix or Hulu Plus. Roku now has 225 entertainment channels including paid and free services for music and video. The average Roku user downloads 15 channels.
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Google Forces Roku to Take Down Its YouTube Channel

Google Forces Roku to Take Down Its YouTube Channel | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Playing YouTube videos on your Roku player just a got a lot harder: Google made Roku take down a private channel that brought YouTube videos to the device, likely because it violated YouTube's terms of service.
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Roku shrinks its box, puts it on an MHL thumb drive

Roku shrinks its box, puts it on an MHL thumb drive | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Roku announced the launch of a new product line of so-called Streaming Sticks on Wednesday that will enable consumers as well as TV manufacturers to add Roku’s platform to TVs simply by plugging a USB-stick-like device into a special HDMI port. Roku is partnering with Best Buy to sell the stick together with the retailer’s Insignia TVs, but it will also make it available separately to consumers by this fall.  Roku’s Streaming Stick will essentially offer the same capabilities as its current lineup of set-top boxes but with a much smaller form factor. The stick will be about as big as a USB flash drive, Roku CEO Anthony Wood told me during a phone conversation on Tuesday. Roku’s stick makes use of Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL), a new display-port technology that was originally invented to connect cell phones to HD TV sets. MHL is self-powered, so Roku doesn’t need to ship the device with any power adapter. The technology also allows users to control their Roku stick with their existing remote control.  The downside of MHL is that it is still really new. Currently only a few TV sets are supporting the standard. Wood told me that he expects many more manufacturers to jump on board this year. Of course, many of these new TV sets will also come with built-in app platforms. So why would consumers spend an additional $50 to $100 for a smart-TV dongle? Wood told me that he sees a lot of potential in lower-priced TV sets like the ones from Insignia that don’t bother with adding Google TV or Yahoo Widgets, and he added that a separate stick is easier to update than a solution embedded in a TV.

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Video - Boxee, Roku Predict Pay TV's Transformation

Video - Boxee, Roku Predict Pay TV's Transformation | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Internet video could transform the pay-TV industry, as cable MSOs could use the Web to market programming to subscribers outside the geographic reach of their networks, say the CEOs of Boxee and Roku Inc. We don't know which cable company will be the first to market Internet video programming to non-subscribers outside their territories, but Roku CEO Anthony Wood said it is inevitable that pay-TV providers will expand into OTT video. "Within 12 to 24 months we will see a traditional cable company go over the top,"
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