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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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New Challenges Chip Away at Cable’s Pillar of Profit

New Challenges Chip Away at Cable’s Pillar of Profit | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
A future where consumers will be able to assemble an à la carte menu of entertainment suddenly seems much closer.
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

"I’m looking forward to the day when I can buy only what I want to watch, or eat, without economic penalty. In other words, no, I do not want fries with that"

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Why Cord Cutting May Be A False Flag for The Future of TV

Why Cord Cutting May Be A False Flag for The Future of TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...Defining television as video content you watch in one specific environment or using one particular method (while online video content is some unknowable “other”) creates a line of demarcation that gets hazy when you consider a show like Arrested Development, which jumped between the two relatively intact. As author Warren Ellis recently wrote, “I think it’s worth admitting, now, that ‘television’ has become one of those legacy words, like ‘phone,’ that we use to point at a thing, without really fully describing it. It certainly doesn’t mean what it used to.”

“We don’t actually believe there is such a thing as digital video. It’s all just TV,” said Jon Heller, co-founder and co-CEO of FreeWheel, which works with companies to monetize content within the new media space. “No one buys kitchen television, in terms of advertising, the same way that they don’t buy living room television or bedroom television. It is all just TV.” The difference, he says, is that the audience now has more choices about when and where they watch, and the television industry needs to figure out how to deal with that diffusion.

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With Subscriptions, YouTube Fires Shot Across Cable TV's Bow

With Subscriptions, YouTube Fires Shot Across Cable TV's Bow | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Video With a widely expected announcement to let some YouTube channels charge monthly subscriptions of 99 cents and up, Google is positioning its video site as the anti-cable TV: a video service willing to offer individual channels on the cheap rather...
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

Expected news, but interesting timing in concert with the introduction of the "Television Consumer Freedom Act" by Sen. McCain http://lat.ms/10Aoxy1


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How Netflix wants to change television forever

How Netflix wants to change television forever | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Netflix doesn’t just want to compete with traditional pay TV networks like HBO, Showtime and Starz – it wants to change television forever. The company envisions a future for TV in which old-fashioned things like ratings, schedule and recaps simply don’t matter anymore.

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Is a Tablet the Only TV You Need?

Is a Tablet the Only TV You Need? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...While planting your face in front of a tiny screen is perfectly acceptable on trans-Atlantic flights, it can be a little odd at home. But if you give yourself over to the tablet, it's actually a pretty awesome experience. I'm not claiming an iPad beats the big screen, but I will say this: Watching shows and movies on a tablet feels closer to what television viewing should be like in the 21st century than what 21st-century TVs actually deliver.  Yes, there are "smart" televisions that come with Wi-Fi and video-streaming services like Netflix and Hulu Plus baked in, but they feel sluggish compared to tablets. Devices that help bridge the gap between Internet-based content and your living room's television, like Apple TV and the Xbox 360, are pretty excellent, but once you've become accustomed to the speed and intimacy of using something like an iPad to watch your shows and films, it's hard to deal with tech that's not as responsive. Even simple things on a tablet, like briskly flicking through a menu of movies or accurately rewinding with the tip of your finger, can be pleasurable. As the gadgets in our pockets and handbags and briefcases become the most impressive technological objects in our lives, the good ol' TV setups in our homes can feel painfully slow and antiquated.  And what these futuristic slates lack in eye-popping bigness, they make up for in deft portability. Want to watch "Monday Night Football" in your backyard for a more tailgate-like experience? You can do that. Spouse kick you off the big screen to watch "Glee?" Grab the tablet and head to the attic. The tablet can be a marriage saver in one-television households. It's also the best thing to happen to lazy Sunday mornings since breakfast in bed...

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OATC Announces "Online Multimedia Authorization Protocol"

OATC Announces "Online Multimedia Authorization Protocol" | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...The OMAP specification will benefit stakeholders in the online subscription content ecosystem:

-- Multimedia content publishers and distributors will reduce unauthorized access to content, share a common architecture to minimize operational overhead and cost and provide consumers with
standardized, secure access to media content over the Internet using their home and mobile devices and client software.

-- Technology vendors and third-party service providers can develop value-added services and commercial solutions to deploy across the entire subscription content ecosystem.

-- Consumers get choice, convenience and a simple and consistent experience, unlike today's proprietary solutions.

"OATC [Open Authentication Technology Committee] is creating the open standards needed to enable simple online access to subscription TV services by bridging the gaps in existing technology with practical and workable solutions," said Glenn Reitmeier, OATC president. "We are very excited to announce this preview of our first of several standards to come that will help MVPDs and programmers give their subscribers more choices than ever before." The OATC is inviting the public to download (http://www.oatc.us/Standards/Download.aspx ) the draft specification and provide comments by May 4, 2012.

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Tryphoon's comment, April 6, 2012 4:04 PM
We're co-authors!
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Four Weird Things the Internet Is Doing to Our Understanding of Television

Four Weird Things the Internet Is Doing to Our Understanding of Television | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...When it comes to delivering audio-visual content to a wide audience, the Internet has lowered the barriers to entry so far that anyone with even the dinkiest camera can become a major broadcaster. The television industry may face a crisis of overhead when a large number of scrappy upstarts deliver comparable value with almost no fixed costs. Also, there are some aspects of the television business that the Internet simply does better, specifically when it comes to reaching an audience.  So there is the scent of blood in the water, and out of the resulting frenzy a few lessons have appeared. Here are four of them.  

- There doesn’t have to be a difference between a “channel” and a “show.”...
- Programming can now be delivered to your television set through a remote control...

- Marketing and distribution are often the same thing...

- Television is no longer that different from publishing...

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Aereo to deliver 20 broadcast channels, DVR to New Yorkers with iPad, Kindle Fire, mobile phones

Aereo to deliver 20 broadcast channels, DVR to New Yorkers with iPad, Kindle Fire, mobile phones | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Aereo plans to launch a technology platform on March 14 which will allow New York City residents to watch and record programming from 20 broadcast networks on PCs, tablets and mobile phones, including Apple's (Nasdaq: AAPL) iPad and Amazon's (Nasdaq: AMZN) Kindle Fire.  Aereo is also compatible with Roku and Apple TV, and may appeal to cable cord-cutters that could use those Internet video set-tops to watch live TV channels.  Formerly known as Bamboom, Aereo was founded by advanced advertising and cable technology whiz Chet Kanojia, who sold Navic Networks to Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) in 2008. Navic developed targeted advertising technology that it licensed to Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC), Charter Communications (Nasdaq: CHTR), Cox Communications and other cable MSOs. According to an invitation Aereo sent to reporters, Kanojia plans to detail Aereo's strategy at a press conference Tuesday morning that will feature IAC chairman Barry Diller, who is expected to announce that he backing Aereo.  Targeting "urban mobile" consumers who may want to cut the cord on pay TV subscriptions, Aereo has developed TV antennas that are smaller than a fingernail, and will link hundreds of thousands of the antennas at data centers to storage devices and Web servers that can deliver video that is converted to HTML5 to viewers in New York. Aereo will also incorporate social TV viewing...

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Barriers fall between TV, Internet

...Some entrepreneurs are toying with new models that tap into an Internet specialty - the ability to tailor choices to the individual viewer - that might give advertisers a better platform on the Internet than they have in one-size-fits-all cable TV audiences.  But true Internet TV is facing a big obstacle: It's the old-school cable and cable-like services, after all, that have got the makers of programming locked up in mega-contracts.

"There's technology, and then there's commerce," said Jim Barry of the Consumer Electronics Association. "The technology is ahead."  Commerce, meanwhile, hasn't fully figured out the best way to make a buck off Internet video...

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Internet Threat to Satellite TV | Inside Digital Media

Internet Threat to Satellite TV | Inside Digital Media | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...While “cord-cutting” threatens Cable operators, it is a clear-and-present-danger to Satellite TV systems. That’s because only a small fraction of Satellite TV subscribers also get Internet service via satellite.  The two dominate domestic Satellite TV operators are DirectTV and Dish Networks. In combination they have about 33 million domestic subscribers with an estimated one-third in rural locations. Most subscribers also want Internet access, but Satellite TV operators subcontract Internet access to third parties which are generally telephone companies. Thus, when Satellite TV subscribers choose to bypass Pay TV by metaphorically “cutting-the-Satellite-cord”, they are most often discontinuing Satellite TV service and upgrading ISP service from telephone carriers. Consequently, Satellite TV operators lose the Pay TV subscriber without benefitting by keeping, and upgrading, the Internet subscriber.  Unfortunately satellite-based Internet service is often unable to compete effectively. Since geosynchronous satellites are 22,000 miles distant, the round trip to a file server on the Internet is 88,000 miles. The lengthy round trip combined with sundry routing & processing results in delays of nearly a full second which is a near-eternity in the Internet world. The inherent lag is intolerable for a number of applications such as Voice-over-IP (Skype), Internet gaming, and Virtual Private Networks.

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BSkyB Posts Record Profits, Touts New U.K.-Wide Internet TV Service

BSkyB Posts Record Profits, Touts New U.K.-Wide Internet TV Service | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The pay TV platform announced new plans for a broadband TV service taking on Netflix and LoveFilm later this year. BSkyB posted record first-half operating profits up 16 percent to £601 million ($986 million) on revenues up 6 percent to $5.6 billion and announced new plans to launch a U.K.-wide TV streaming service Tuesday.  CEO Jeremy Darroch – who announced yesterday that Sky had struck streaming TV deals with the BBC’s i-Player service and with ITV’s catch-up platform ITVPlayer – said that later this year it plans to launch a broadband Internet TV service to all homes in the U.K.  Currently its services are available to only the 10.5 million homes that subscribe to its own services but the new subscription based service will target the 13 million plus homes who are not Sky subscribers.  “Alongside the continued growth of our satellite platform this will be a new way for us to reach out to consumers who may not want the whole Sky service.”

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Forget Hulu and Amazon: What Netflix is worried about is TV Everywhere

Forget Hulu and Amazon: What Netflix is worried about is TV Everywhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

“As we’ve often said, we see the biggest long term threat as TV Everywhere, and in particular, HBO GO, the leading implementation of TV Everywhere to date. HBO has some great content, particularly their original series, but today for most people it is locked behind a linear interface, or at best, behind a DVR interface and in all cases tethered to a linear subscription plan. As HBO GO grows and becomes the primary way that consumers experience HBO, it will become a much more effective competitor for viewing time.  Similarly, Showtime’s TV Everywhere application is very impressive and just starting to gain traction. Every major network is investing in their Internet application, on tablets, smart TVs, phones, game consoles, and laptops. Pricing is simple: the consumer just authenticates with their MVPD provider.  Over the next few years, UIs will evolve in astounding ways, such as allowing viewers to watch eight simultaneous games on ESPN, color coding where the best action is in a given moment or allowing Olympics fans the ability to control their own slow-motion replays. A decade from now, choosing a linear feed from a broadcast grid of 200 channels will seem like using a rotary dial telephone,” Netflix’s managers wrote....

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Virtual MSO will emerge in 2012; Netflix, Amazon among possible players

A virtual cable MSO will emerge in 2012, using the Internet to distribute national cable networks to pay TV subscribers, veteran cable analyst Richard Greenfield predicted Friday. Among the players Greenfield says could launch a virtual cable operation are Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT), Amazon (Nasdaq: AMZN), Apple (Nasdaq: AAPL) and Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX), Greenfield said. Pay TV providers such as Verizon (NYSE: VZ), Dish Network (Nasdaq: DISH), AT&T (NYSE: T) and Comcast (Nasdaq: CMCSA) could also use over-the-top video to sell pay TV subscriptions nationwide, he added.  "We believe the stage is set for one or more virtual MSOs to be created in 2012," Greenfield, managing director and media analyst at BTIG, wrote in a blog post. While getting cable networks to agree to licensing deals remains one of the biggest challenges for virtual operators, Greenfield notes that telcos and DBS providers were able to overcome those obstacles.

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Hulu Plans to Hook Subscription Service Into Google Chromecast

Hulu Plans to Hook Subscription Service Into Google Chromecast | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

"...Hulu won’t be able to easily stop users of Google’s new Chromecast from using the “cast” feature to stream Hulu.com video from a Chrome browser tab to a TV. But that’s not a big deal —  it’s effectively equivalent to connecting your computer to the TV via HDMI, which the website has never been able to prevent. Rather, expect Hulu to emphasize that it is enhancing its iOS and Android apps to take advantage of the native capabilities of the Chromecast device, for smoother playback and better remote-control capabilities and browsing."

Peter Rosenberg's insight:

File under: "If you can't beat 'em, join them."

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Google’s Chromecast Lets You Watch TV on the Web on Your TV. Guess Who Doesn’t Like That?

Google’s Chromecast Lets You Watch TV on the Web on Your TV. Guess Who Doesn’t Like That? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

"...Of course, anyone with any common sense, who doesn’t work in legal or biz dev at a large entertainment company, knows that it’s silly to argue that something that’s on one screen shouldn’t be on another. And anyone who wants to buy a cable and connect their laptop to their TV could already do this.

Which is exactly what Ossama Alami, a manager in Google’s developer relations group, told my colleague Liz Gannes when she asked him about the issue today.

There is one solution for content owners who don’t want people using Chromecast to fling stuff to their sets, Alami noted: Stop distributing their stuff on the Chrome browser. Not that he’s suggesting they should do that.

It’s worth noting that this move comes as Google is floating the notion of an “over the top” pay-TV solution, and talking to content owners and networks about licensing their stuff. And it comes after Google has already irked some content owners with earlier versions of Google TV, supposedly because Google didn’t work hard enough to keep pirated content off of those devices.

You’d think that if Google were serious about its latest TV push, it would take extra care not to ruffle the TV guys’ feathers. So maybe it doesn’t think this is a ruffle-worthy issue. Or maybe it just doesn’t care."

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HBO CEO mulls teaming with broadband partners for HBO GO

SAN FRANCISCO, March 21 (Reuters) - HBO could widen accessto its HBO GO online streaming service by teaming up withbroadband Internet providers for customers who do not subscribeto a cable TV service,...
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

...

HBO, owned by Time Warner Inc, relies on large financial support from its cable and satellite TV partners to help distribute and promote its shows.

Internet-only rivals such as Netflix Inc and Amazon.com Inc are trying to disrupt this approach by delivering original programming directly over the Internet.

This is a challenge to HBO, however it would be a risky step for the company to by-pass its traditional distribution partners, which provide HBO with lucrative subscription fees.

There are billions of dollars generated from HBO's existing distribution network and to simply circumvent that would not make business sense, Plepler said in January, according to the Wall Street Journal.

"Doesn't mean we are not mindful that the problem exists," he added.

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What's Going to Kill the TV Business?

What's Going to Kill the TV Business? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...What's going to kill the TV business, or at least challenge it, isn't Apple designing the perfect remote or Microsoft designing a superior guide. It's two things.

First is the rising cost of entertainment, which is happening right now. The sitcoms and great dramas you love cost more to produce every year because they're labor intensive. Sports rights are seeing even worse inflation. ESPN recently signed a deal with the NFL to pay 73% more each year for Monday Night Football. So Comcast and its ilk are stuck between rising programming costs and flat-lining middle class wages. That's a problem, and eventually something has to give. But in the short term, providers can merge and channels can be cut and costs can be saved. Expensive shows and sports rights shouldn't destroy the TV business on their own.

Combined with a second trend -- the accelerating exodus of attention away from television -- the TV business might really be in trouble. But this second trend is still more of a projection than a reality. One hundred million households still pay for a bundle of networks. That number isn't really going down. With the pace of household formation tripling in the last year, it could even go up. The number of cord-cutters -- households that have replaced the bundle with over-the-Internet video like Netflix -- is in the low single-digit millions. TV-providers have even found a hedge against cord cutting. They've become Internet-providers and expanded overseas to make up the revenue they're not making here. Cord-cutting is a marginal trend that could sneakily turn mainstream, creating an innovator's dilemma for TV and cable. But not yet.

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At London Olympics, NBC Says, 'If Cameras Are on It, We'll Stream It'

At London Olympics, NBC Says, 'If Cameras Are on It, We'll Stream It' | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

All 32 sports at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London will be streamed live at nbcolympics.com.  “The hot topic is always, ‘Why don’t you show all your sports live?’” said Rick Cordella, vice president and general manager of NBC Sports Digital Media. “We wanted to take care of that.”  But in reversing a previous policy that did not fully embrace live streaming — the formal announcement will be made Wednesday — there will be a wrinkle to provide a measure of protection for the segment of NBC’s Olympic coverage that is still its most critical: the prime-time broadcast.  An important event like a gold-medal race involving Michael Phelps will be streamed live on nbcolympics.com, but will not be archived on the Web site until sometime after the prime-time show. Other staples of NBC’s prime-time coverage — including swimming, diving, gymnastics, track and field, and beach volleyball — will be treated the same way.  Even so, Mr. Cordella said, “The vast majority of events will be archived immediately.”

The live streaming of every event is a major shift at the NBC Sports Group, which was formed after Comcast acquired control of NBC Universal. Under General Electric, its former owner, NBC Sports did not stream live events that would be featured in prime time, lest they diminish ratings.  Two years ago, at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver, only hockey and curling were streamed live in order to protect prime time. At the 2008 Beijing Summer Games, 25 sports were streamed live but none of them were important to the evening broadcast, which is usually at least four hours long.

“The way consumers consume video has changed over the years,” Mr. Cordella said. “We can’t go back with hindsight and say we were wrong.”

He said that NBC had data to show that live streaming could increase viewership of a event shown hours later on delay. “We’re not scared of cannibalization,” Mr. Cordella said, adding, “Anytime you have a great event that happens before it shows on the air, it increases ratings and generates buzz.”
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Is Intel working on a major TV initiative?

Is Intel working on a major TV initiative? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Intel has approached media companies with plans to launch a virtual pay TV service, selling subscription bundles over the Internet as opposed to through local cable networks, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. The move could mark a defiant comeback to the TV space just months after the chip maker shelved a unit that produced CPUs for Google TV and other connected platforms. This time around, Intel apparently wants to do it alone.  The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Intel is planning to launch a service on its own set-top boxes and market it directly to the consumer – a big change in strategy for a company that previously was content with powering third-party products with its own chip sets. The paper has also learned that Intel could launch the service as early as late 2012

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BSkyB's internet TV plan is brilliant, a rare example of perfect timing

BSkyB's internet TV plan is brilliant, a rare example of perfect timing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

On the internet, it's always better to jump before you're pushed... Equally, though, timing matters. Ten years ago I recall mobile phone companies that had just spend billions on 3G bids demonstrating to journalists how the latest handsets could stream TV direct to their mobiles. It was great, if you wanted to watch something that looked like the first moon landing viewed on a TV across a road. TV on mobiles didn't take off; music did. But now we have the bandwidth and processing power to give us video capability all over the place. And what I think is the most impressive case of jumping before being pushed in the media ecosystem recently: BSkyB's announcement that it's going to launch an internet TV service that will let you get content from it on an ad hoc basis, no matter whether you use Sky's broadband or pay for Sky in your home.  In essence, Sky is doing with its TV output what Amazon does with the Kindle: saying "we don't mind how you view our content. We just want to be the conduit so we benefit from your attention." Video-on-demand (VoD) for anyone prepared to pay, not just existing users of its pay TV service.

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Nielsen: Number of homes subscribing to cable decreasing

Nielsen: Number of homes subscribing to cable decreasing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Americans are still watching plenty of TV programming (maybe too much for their own good), but how they’re going about it is changing.  The migration from the traditional cable television setup to Internet-connected options (whether it be a computer, mobile device or just the TV itself) with streaming video subscriptions isn’t happening drastically or overnight.  But the shifts in behavior and how people are spending their money on digital media is still significant.  According to a new survey from Nielsen Wire, homes with broadband Internet and free, broadcast TV are becoming a growing trend, increasing by 22.8 percent during the last year.  Sure, they represent only less than five percent of U.S. households with TVs, but Nielsen found that this demographic tended to stream video twice as much as the general population and watch half as much TV. That’s a big deal for online advertisers as well as the content providers, whether it be the digital media services (i.e. Netflix) or the networks and movie studios.

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Redbox Partners With Verizon To Launch Streaming Video Service | Fast Company

Redbox Partners With Verizon To Launch Streaming Video Service | Fast Company | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Coinstar subsidiary Redbox today announced a new partnership with Verizon for the launch of a streaming video service. The joint venture will launch in second half of 2012 and be a subscription-based and "affordable service that will allow all consumers across the U.S. to enjoy the new and popular entertainment they want, whenever they choose, using the media and devices they prefer," the companies said in a statement.  With the new service, Coinstar better positions its primary business for the digital age. Redbox's kiosks, generally located at grocery or retail stores such as Walmart, offer customers dollar-a-day DVD or video game rentals. With the addition of a streaming service and its new-fledged partnership with Verizon, Redbox now further complicates a crowded field of digital streaming juggernauts that include Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu.

... Details of the partnership are still sparse. The companies only indicated they plan to introduce a "product portfolio" and will offer "subscription services." It's unclear what these services are; how or whether they will be bundled with Redbox's kiosk business or Verizon's VOD services; what content these services might provide; or how much it'll cost.

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A Virtual MSO Shall Rise, Boxee CEO Says

The United States's first virtual MSO will materialize later this year, giving broadband devices a new way to deliver on-demand and live subscription TV services directly to consumers, predicts Boxee CEO Avner Ronen.  The prediction came up during a discussion with Light Reading Cable about a week after Boxee started shipping a component that feeds over-the-air digital TV broadcasts to the Boxee Box. (See Boxee Tees Up Live TV Cord-Cutting Tool .)  But Boxee has no interest in becoming a virtual MSO itself. That's an expensive proposition that reportedly scared off even the deep-pocketed Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT), which opted instead for pay-TV partnerships that send content to the Xbox 360. (See Microsoft Puts Pay-TV Plan on Pause and Comcast, Verizon Connect With the Xbox 360.)  "We don't have an appetite to become a virtual MSO in the sense of us going out and licensing those channels and providing ... guarantees and so on," Ronen says. "We'd much rather [have] somebody like Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) or DirecTV Group Inc. (NYSE: DTV) or Netflix Inc. (Nasdaq: NFLX) or Amazon.com Inc. (Nasdaq: AMZN) do those deals and for us to support those over-the-top offerings on our platform like we do today for traditional over-the-top."  Still, Ronen thinks there's a good chance that someone, perhaps an incumbent pay-TV player, will try the virtual MSO model this year.

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NBC Puts the Super Bowl on the Web Because It Thinks You’ll Watch It on TV

NBC Puts the Super Bowl on the Web Because It Thinks You’ll Watch It on TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Super Bowl is the most valuable show on TV. Which is why NBC can charge a reported $3.5 million for a 30-second spot during the Giants-Patriots game this Sunday.  But if you watch the game on the Web, your eyeballs are worth a whole lot less. NBC, which is streaming the entire thing for the first time ever, will be lucky to get anything near a million dollars for that same ad when it runs online.  So why is Comcast’s broadcast network putting the game on the Web, period? Isn’t this the classic analog-dollars-to-digital-dimes trade that Big Media strives so hard to avoid?  Nope, says Rick Cordella, who runs digital for NBC Sports. The network assumes that nearly every eyeball — and every ad dollar — that it gets from the Web this week will be a bonus, because whoever watches online is simultaneously watching on a big TV, the way football is supposed to be watched.  This is supposed to be the classic “second screen” experience that Twitter’s Dick Costolo and so many other digital folks are excited about.  And that makes plenty of sense to me. Many TV guys have gotten plenty comfortable with the idea of streaming their most valuable live sports events online, for free. In most of those cases, the general assumption is that anyone who’s watching on the Web is someone who can’t watch the game on a TV to begin with — see the CBS/Turner Sports livestreams of the NCAA March Madness tournament.  And in NBC’s case, it is packing the Webcast full of extra camera angles and other goodies, including a feature that will let you rewatch every Super Bowl commercial once it’s aired. The assumption is that you’re holding the TV remote in one hand, and controlling your laptop with another.

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Report: 'Very serious' Verizon weighs buying Netflix

Rumors that Verizon (NYSE: VZ) is considerring buying Netflix (Nasdaq: NFLX) are heating up with the Bloomberg reporting that at least one investment banker thinks the streaming video company could be sold by Easter. "I am hearing rumblings from inside Verizon that they are very serious about either Netflix or something similar," said Porter Bibb, managing partner at Mediatech Capital. Bill said Netflix could go for as much as $4.6 billion; the once-high-flying company has a market cap of $4.17 billion. Verizon has acknowledged it wants to develop a streaming business, with Verizon CEO Lowell McAdam at a conference last week, saying it continues "to look at alternatives. "Verizon was one of the companies that looked at Hulu when it was on the market earlier this year. "The jury's out, but I do believe there's a place for over-the-top," said McAdam. "That model has yet to be determined and I hope we'll be a player in that."

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Tryphoon's comment, December 13, 2011 2:17 PM
So buying NFLX was a good move, right?