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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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The Superbox Arrives: Hybrid Gateways to Unify TV & IP

As the cable industry continues to look for ways to embrace Internet video, MSOs are taking increased interest in new devices that can handle both traditional TV and broadband data. A single box includes a cable modem and TV tuners, along with home-networking capability and other bells and whistles. This movement is an extension of an age-old concept of installing a single box in the home that can manage and distribute media and services all around the home. These new "superboxes" go by many names – including digital media centers, whole-home solutions, multimedia gateways and hybrid gateways. The latter seems most appropriate, since the current devices are combining video and data technologies into a single platform.

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Comcast Taking Video Delivery Into the Cloud

Comcast Taking Video Delivery Into the Cloud | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Comcast could soon make its video services over IP, EVP of Strategy & Development Sam Schwartz wrote in a blog post. The Xcalibur initiative, as it's called, could revolutionize the way that Comcast customers browse, search and discover content...
...delivering its programming over IP could enable Comcast to create a better user experience for browsing and searching for content. New IP set-top boxes that Comcast is testing in Augusta, Ga. will include a universal search engine that will help users find content whether it’s on live TV, on Comcast’s video-on-demand service or recorded on their DVRs. Those set-top boxes will also have interactive apps available, including Internet applications like Facebook, Pandora and links to local traffic and weather. In other words, extending services over IP will not only open up a whole new range of connected devices that Comcast could potentially reach, but the initiative could improve the user experience of its existing electronic programming guide and navigation system.
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Connected TVs Will Help Drive Big Changes in Video Services

Connected TVs Will Help Drive Big Changes in Video Services | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
t is undeniable that connected TVs – also known as smart TVs or Internet-enabled TVs – are having an impact on the pay TV world, and IPTV in particular. Sales of TVs with built-in Internet connectivity have been rapid, and the capabilities of their platforms are developing – for instance to enable an app-store-like approach to content and applications familiar to smartphone and tablet users, as well as electronic program guides (EPGs) and search and recommendation engines familiar to pay TV subscribers. Connected TVs have an ability to penetrate the market that makes them more important than previous attempts to develop "over-the-top" (OTT) TV services based on set-top boxes (STBs) – an approach tried by Apple, Yahoo!, Slingbox and others, with only limited success. Connected TVs have given a boost to the OTT TV/video model, but it is far from certain that they will help the standalone OTT box concept. Pay TV network operators cannot afford to ignore the impact that connected TVs will have on their business. Though the use of IPTV is growing, the consumption of OTT Internet content is growing faster.
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Does the pipe really matter?

Does the pipe really matter? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Every day and every week, people in the TV technology industry talk about Pay TV, Cable, Satellite, IPTV, OTT, Internet TV, Connected TV and all sorts of technical delivery platforms for content. We go to conferences about it where there is much discussion about how one is better than the other because of the special nuances of the particular delivery mechanism. It turns into a war between OTT and PayTV, between OTT and IPTV, between IPTV and Cable TV etc. However the consumer point is being missed. They don’t actually care about the tech. They care about whether it has the content they want, whether it is cheap or expensive, how easy it is to use, whether they can have the content the way they want it, and all other sorts of usage related characteristics. They don’t care if it is IP packets, ATM packets, or MPEG2 packets. BSkyB is successful in the UK because it gets content to the customer in way that is not too uncomfortable, and not because of their Middleware solution or their return path tech, or their forward path capability or lack thereof. Without the content, then Sky would lose customers even with the best tech solution in the world. Content solutions need to be the focus – we need to concentrate on that and not the tech. The tech is a means to an end for the majority of viewers and consumers out there, and we have forgotten that in the rush to new technology. It also helps that all those tech methods are now taking on very similar if not identical characteristics through hybridisation. Is this the Emperor’s New Clothes moment?
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Shift happens: the new way to watch film and TV

Shift happens: the new way to watch film and TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The ascent of Netflix signals a broader shift in the way we consume television. For example, "news" programmes aren't really news in that they aren't fresh, they're already reheated when we watch them at 6pm or 11pm. Many TV programmes, from John Stewarts's Daily Show to PBS's Nightly News, can be watched on a PC when we – not they – are available. Tomorrow, we'll get all of them (minus NBC, perhaps) on Netflix or one of its competitors. But what about "really live" events: NBA finals, Wimbledon, the Superbowl, Indy 500 (or Formula 1 races for us degenerate Europeans)? Today, we have choices, we can use the DVR to time-shift and get rid of annoying ads, or we get the show in real time, with ads. This is changing rapidly: NBA (basketball) and MLB (baseball) games are available live on Apple TV through the internet, not cable TV. For the time being, Netflix doesn't offer such events, just movies and TV series.
This is Internet TV, but is it IPTV?
What we have today is a digitised video stream chopped up and stuffed into dumb IP packets. Here, dumb means little or no metadata, little or no upstream information or interactivity. IPTV means TV endowed with roughly the intelligence of a PC browser. More specifically, IPTV provides targeted ads, multiple windows, interactive commerce, games, Facebook and Twitter engagement, instant messaging to friends: "Quick, get on Channel 36!" This will lead to unforeseen but retroactively obvious usage modes, giving us a truly new medium, not just a shovelware version of an old one.
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