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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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Cable companies ordered to support HD content streaming within homes by 2014

Cable companies ordered to support HD content streaming within homes by 2014 | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The FCC has ordered cable operators (and TiVo) to update their cable boxes to include support for HD streaming over home networks to devices like PCs, smart TVs, and tablets. In addition to video streaming, cable boxes must also allow HD video recording on external devices through home networks. By June 2nd 2014 the vast majority of set top boxes will have to support an open standard, although cable companies with fewer than 400,000 subscribers have been given an extra three months to implement the changes.  The commission originally ordered cable companies to support network-based streaming back in 2010, but TiVo protested the order saying "if each cable operator deploys set-top boxes with its own understanding of an open industry standard, the result may be an outcome that is neither standard nor open." The FCC has now clarified that an open standard should enable companies to work together without consultation, explaining that video streaming should work even if the cable company and (for example) PC manufacturer have never had any contact with each other.

Both the FCC and Verizon have cited the successor to the DLNA Premium Video Profile, which should be agreed upon at some point next year, as an example of a compliant protocol that cable companies could adopt. In order for the standard to comply, it must support "recordable high-definition video, closed captioning data, service discovery, video transport, and remote control command pass-through."  It'll be down to each company to choose the standard they want to use, but whatever happens, customers should be free to watch (and record) their cable TV content on any household device they choose.

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ken nelson's curator insight, December 18, 2012 6:25 PM

humm...mabye dlna clients for mobile devcies in the home could be a new form/source of ad revenue

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FCC Adds Internet Delivery to Video Competition Report

FCC Adds Internet Delivery to Video Competition Report | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON: The Internet is officially a TV platform. Television regulators are now including online delivery in the 14th Annual Video Competition Report they started in 2009. Today, the Federal Communications Commission issued a Further Notice of Inquiry to gather more information for the 2009 report. The intent of the report is to adjust content and distribution rules based on diversity and provider availability.
The video industry has evolved such that the FCC is having a time getting a handle on it. First, there was broadcast TV. Then cable. Then satellite. Then Verizon and AT&T with their multichannel video services. Now, there’s more and more TV shows online and increasingly, in cell phones.
The commission’s 14th “annual” report initially comprised data from 2007-09. Since then, the FCC reviewed its data-collection techniques and decided it didn’t have enough information “to produce an adequate report.” It’s now seeking additional data for 2009, first-time data for 2010, and for the first time ever, for online video distribution.
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Cable asks FCC to halt plans for connected TV standard

Cable asks FCC to halt plans for connected TV standard | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The FCC has been working on plans to create AllVid, a new CableCARD replacement standard for the delivery of IP video services and applications to Internet-connected television sets. The National Cable and Telecommunications Association, however, wants the FCC to back off. Former FCC Chairman Michael Powell, now head of the NCTA, wrote current FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski a letter last week urging him to stop working on AllVid. Powell cited the wide array of TV apps popping up on connected TVs, tablets and mobile devices as proof that such a standard is unnecessary. The FCC is seeking comment on AllVid in an effort to merge traditional TV channels and connected devices. The AllVid hardware would act as a universal adapter for all types of subscription TV content, delivered through a wide variety of means, including cable, satellite, VDSL, IPTV and Internet TV. The cable industry flatly opposes the standard. Powell said the growing acceptance of new authenticated TV Everywhere services, as well as cable’s adoption of cloud-based programming guides and user interfaces, are proof that pay-TV operators are rapidly adapting to the challenges of the digital age.
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