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Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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Why Cord Cutting May Be A False Flag for The Future of TV

Why Cord Cutting May Be A False Flag for The Future of TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...Defining television as video content you watch in one specific environment or using one particular method (while online video content is some unknowable “other”) creates a line of demarcation that gets hazy when you consider a show like Arrested Development, which jumped between the two relatively intact. As author Warren Ellis recently wrote, “I think it’s worth admitting, now, that ‘television’ has become one of those legacy words, like ‘phone,’ that we use to point at a thing, without really fully describing it. It certainly doesn’t mean what it used to.”

“We don’t actually believe there is such a thing as digital video. It’s all just TV,” said Jon Heller, co-founder and co-CEO of FreeWheel, which works with companies to monetize content within the new media space. “No one buys kitchen television, in terms of advertising, the same way that they don’t buy living room television or bedroom television. It is all just TV.” The difference, he says, is that the audience now has more choices about when and where they watch, and the television industry needs to figure out how to deal with that diffusion.

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Nielsen: Number of homes subscribing to cable decreasing

Nielsen: Number of homes subscribing to cable decreasing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Americans are still watching plenty of TV programming (maybe too much for their own good), but how they’re going about it is changing.  The migration from the traditional cable television setup to Internet-connected options (whether it be a computer, mobile device or just the TV itself) with streaming video subscriptions isn’t happening drastically or overnight.  But the shifts in behavior and how people are spending their money on digital media is still significant.  According to a new survey from Nielsen Wire, homes with broadband Internet and free, broadcast TV are becoming a growing trend, increasing by 22.8 percent during the last year.  Sure, they represent only less than five percent of U.S. households with TVs, but Nielsen found that this demographic tended to stream video twice as much as the general population and watch half as much TV. That’s a big deal for online advertisers as well as the content providers, whether it be the digital media services (i.e. Netflix) or the networks and movie studios.

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A Virtual MSO Shall Rise, Boxee CEO Says

The United States's first virtual MSO will materialize later this year, giving broadband devices a new way to deliver on-demand and live subscription TV services directly to consumers, predicts Boxee CEO Avner Ronen.  The prediction came up during a discussion with Light Reading Cable about a week after Boxee started shipping a component that feeds over-the-air digital TV broadcasts to the Boxee Box. (See Boxee Tees Up Live TV Cord-Cutting Tool .)  But Boxee has no interest in becoming a virtual MSO itself. That's an expensive proposition that reportedly scared off even the deep-pocketed Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT), which opted instead for pay-TV partnerships that send content to the Xbox 360. (See Microsoft Puts Pay-TV Plan on Pause and Comcast, Verizon Connect With the Xbox 360.)  "We don't have an appetite to become a virtual MSO in the sense of us going out and licensing those channels and providing ... guarantees and so on," Ronen says. "We'd much rather [have] somebody like Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) or DirecTV Group Inc. (NYSE: DTV) or Netflix Inc. (Nasdaq: NFLX) or Amazon.com Inc. (Nasdaq: AMZN) do those deals and for us to support those over-the-top offerings on our platform like we do today for traditional over-the-top."  Still, Ronen thinks there's a good chance that someone, perhaps an incumbent pay-TV player, will try the virtual MSO model this year.

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Netflix: It’s not about the cord

Netflix: It’s not about the cord | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Over-The-Top Video Netflix is often credited (or blamed, depending on your perspective) for inspiring cable cord-cutting by cable and satellite subscribers... With nearly 23 million users in the U.S., Netflix has nearly as many subscribers as Comcast, the nation’s No. 1 cable MSO. By the end of 2011, it is likely to have more total subscribers than HBO, currently the largest subscription video service. More to the point, with its embedded app available on more than 300 different SKUs of connected devices, Netflix’s potential reach already extends to far-more devices than that of any MVPD in the U.S., and it has the luxury of growing internationally — adding to its scale — while U.S. MSOs largely do not. Right now, Netflix’s service — on-demand, a la carte — is highly personalized, whereas MVPD service — fixed tiers, bundled programming packages — is fairly standardized. As sufficient scale, however, even personalized content services will begin to have an aggregate impact that rivals that of pre-bundled, standardized services. [Netflix] is just hoping to get there before anyone really notices.
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Will streaming TV online lead to the death of the big media players?

Will streaming TV online lead to the death of the big media players? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Battle lines are being drawn in the US in the struggle to make serious money out of the nascent online TV market. In one corner, Netflix, the DVD and streaming rental business that shocked the TV industry with a move into original content, splashing out $100m (£61m) to premiere Kevin Spacey's House of Cards remake online. In the other, broadcasters, denying Netflix access to new shows as they grow wary of ceding the video-on-demand initiative to the digital upstart.
Google-owned video sharing website YouTube is also increasing its investment in original content and focus on full-length programming, while Apple is reportedly planning a new cloud-based online video service described by investment bank Jefferies & Co described as an "assault on the living room".
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Cord Cutting Threat Ain't Over Yet

Cord Cutting Threat Ain't Over Yet | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The number of pay TV subscribers increased over the fourth quarter, but the year-over-year growth was the slowest ever for the industry. Even worse, the percentage of households paying for TV actually declined over that period, due to a constrained economy and competition from online sources.
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Cord Cutting Will Go Mainstream When It's More Like Pay TV

Cord Cutting Will Go Mainstream When It's More Like Pay TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The secret to making cord cutting mass market is for over-the-top video to become a little more like pay TV, but without the high price. With these week's news, it looks like we may be inching closer to that reality.
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What's Going to Kill the TV Business?

What's Going to Kill the TV Business? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...What's going to kill the TV business, or at least challenge it, isn't Apple designing the perfect remote or Microsoft designing a superior guide. It's two things.

First is the rising cost of entertainment, which is happening right now. The sitcoms and great dramas you love cost more to produce every year because they're labor intensive. Sports rights are seeing even worse inflation. ESPN recently signed a deal with the NFL to pay 73% more each year for Monday Night Football. So Comcast and its ilk are stuck between rising programming costs and flat-lining middle class wages. That's a problem, and eventually something has to give. But in the short term, providers can merge and channels can be cut and costs can be saved. Expensive shows and sports rights shouldn't destroy the TV business on their own.

Combined with a second trend -- the accelerating exodus of attention away from television -- the TV business might really be in trouble. But this second trend is still more of a projection than a reality. One hundred million households still pay for a bundle of networks. That number isn't really going down. With the pace of household formation tripling in the last year, it could even go up. The number of cord-cutters -- households that have replaced the bundle with over-the-Internet video like Netflix -- is in the low single-digit millions. TV-providers have even found a hedge against cord cutting. They've become Internet-providers and expanded overseas to make up the revenue they're not making here. Cord-cutting is a marginal trend that could sneakily turn mainstream, creating an innovator's dilemma for TV and cable. But not yet.

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Internet Threat to Satellite TV | Inside Digital Media

Internet Threat to Satellite TV | Inside Digital Media | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...While “cord-cutting” threatens Cable operators, it is a clear-and-present-danger to Satellite TV systems. That’s because only a small fraction of Satellite TV subscribers also get Internet service via satellite.  The two dominate domestic Satellite TV operators are DirectTV and Dish Networks. In combination they have about 33 million domestic subscribers with an estimated one-third in rural locations. Most subscribers also want Internet access, but Satellite TV operators subcontract Internet access to third parties which are generally telephone companies. Thus, when Satellite TV subscribers choose to bypass Pay TV by metaphorically “cutting-the-Satellite-cord”, they are most often discontinuing Satellite TV service and upgrading ISP service from telephone carriers. Consequently, Satellite TV operators lose the Pay TV subscriber without benefitting by keeping, and upgrading, the Internet subscriber.  Unfortunately satellite-based Internet service is often unable to compete effectively. Since geosynchronous satellites are 22,000 miles distant, the round trip to a file server on the Internet is 88,000 miles. The lengthy round trip combined with sundry routing & processing results in delays of nearly a full second which is a near-eternity in the Internet world. The inherent lag is intolerable for a number of applications such as Voice-over-IP (Skype), Internet gaming, and Virtual Private Networks.

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Behind the growing urge to cut the cord

Everyone in media agrees that cord cutting has become a big-buzz topic in recent months, with cable subscriptions dropping for the first time and more free online video content available than ever before. The thing no one quite seems to agree on is how immediate the threat of cord cutting really is because it's such a new concept. Now a study from OMD finds that cord cutting could become more prevalent more quickly than many had thought as video viewing from non-traditional sources sees a huge bump. The study finds that already 7 percent of respondents have cut their cable or satellite subscriptions, and another 17 percent say they'd be willing to. At a time when people are looking to save money on their bills as the economic recovery drags on, that's a significant percentage. Online, mobile or tablet viewing offer two significant advantages over traditional TV viewership: fewer commercials and the ability to time shift. Media people will be watching closely to see if those who are mulling a cord cut actually follow through. Robert D'Asaro, U.S. director of digital strategic alliances at OMD, talks to Media Life about cutting the cord, how online video consumption is changing, and why DVRs are actually somewhat limiting.

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Television Ownership Drops in U.S., Nielsen Reports

Television Ownership Drops in U.S., Nielsen Reports | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Nielsen Company, which takes TV set ownership into account when it produces ratings, will tell television networks and advertisers on Tuesday that 96.7 percent of American households now own sets, down from 98.9 percent previously. There are two reasons for the decline, according to Nielsen. One is poverty: some low-income households no longer own TV sets, most likely because they cannot afford new digital sets and antennas. The other is technological wizardry: young people who have grown up with laptops in their hands instead of remote controls are opting not to buy TV sets when they graduate from college or enter the work force, at least not at first. Instead, they are subsisting on a diet of television shows and movies from the Internet. That second reason is prompting Nielsen to think about a redefinition of the term “television household” to include Internet video viewers.
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Another country heard from: OTT Threat Is Overstated

Another country heard from: OTT Threat Is Overstated | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
...After test driving all these boxes, it is clear to me that first-run video content --- not Internet disruption -- is what is really going to be driving tech's growth engine for the next few years.
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Cord-Cutting Greatly Exaggerated: ESPN Study

According to an ESPN analysis of Nielsen's national people meter household sample, only 0.18% cut the multivideo network cord between fourth quarter 2010 and this year's first quarter, below the rate from the prior quarter.
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Cutting the Cable - The State of Internet Based TV | Only Infographic

Cutting the Cable - The State of Internet Based TV | Only Infographic | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The ability to watch your favorite TV show online or share popular videos from YouTube are recent trends, only introduced during the last decade. However, the growt of Internet TV and online video are skyrocketing as we become more connected and are given the ability to save money by watching TV online.
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