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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
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Aereo to deliver 20 broadcast channels, DVR to New Yorkers with iPad, Kindle Fire, mobile phones

Aereo to deliver 20 broadcast channels, DVR to New Yorkers with iPad, Kindle Fire, mobile phones | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Aereo plans to launch a technology platform on March 14 which will allow New York City residents to watch and record programming from 20 broadcast networks on PCs, tablets and mobile phones, including Apple's (Nasdaq: AAPL) iPad and Amazon's (Nasdaq: AMZN) Kindle Fire.  Aereo is also compatible with Roku and Apple TV, and may appeal to cable cord-cutters that could use those Internet video set-tops to watch live TV channels.  Formerly known as Bamboom, Aereo was founded by advanced advertising and cable technology whiz Chet Kanojia, who sold Navic Networks to Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) in 2008. Navic developed targeted advertising technology that it licensed to Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC), Charter Communications (Nasdaq: CHTR), Cox Communications and other cable MSOs. According to an invitation Aereo sent to reporters, Kanojia plans to detail Aereo's strategy at a press conference Tuesday morning that will feature IAC chairman Barry Diller, who is expected to announce that he backing Aereo.  Targeting "urban mobile" consumers who may want to cut the cord on pay TV subscriptions, Aereo has developed TV antennas that are smaller than a fingernail, and will link hundreds of thousands of the antennas at data centers to storage devices and Web servers that can deliver video that is converted to HTML5 to viewers in New York. Aereo will also incorporate social TV viewing...

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Delivering HDTV to TypicalHousehold Entirely Over-the-Top: About 600 Gigabytes Per Month

Delivering HDTV to TypicalHousehold Entirely Over-the-Top: About 600 Gigabytes Per Month | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
If you delivered all the HD video viewed in a typical TV household over an IP-based infrastructure, usage would skyrocket more than 15-fold from today’s average to about 600 Gigabytes per month, according to Morgan Stanley estimates. And for the top quintile of super-heavy viewers, 100% HDTV-over-IP would push the total up past 1.4 Terabytes per month, according to the firm in a report released last week, “Next Up in the Evolution of Media: The Connected TV.” That’s assuming all video content consumed in a home (8 hours of video per day) is delivered over IP. In short: definitely a usage-cap buster, at least given today’s levels. For example, Comcast’s allowance is 250 Gigabytes per month, while AT&T’s caps are set at 150 GB for traditional DSL and 250 GB for U-verse Internet. The bottom line is that none of the broadband access networks were engineered to absorb this much per-subscriber usage. You can’t efficiently move 18 lanes of traffic down a four-lane highway. Well before we get to the all-TV-over-the-Internet stage, ISPs will have to move to bandwidth caps and overage fees — and possibly time-of-day pricing as well — to control the surge
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Cable Operators Hold Keys To Entertainment Future

Consumers have come to expect relatively good deals for Web access. But as broadband becomes the primary focus for cable operators, those days are waning and significant annual cost hikes (with all kinds of usage caps) will become the norm. A teenager today very likely will find a broadband single-play in 2021 costs as much, or more, than a triple-play costs now. Maybe sooner.  It will be intriguing to watch for the inflection point when cable executives find themselves grappling with enough TV subscriber exodus to begin trying to win over Wall Street with an aggressive broadband-first – we-win no-matter-which-way-the-wind-blows -- position. (They can toss in the access business comes without having to pay huge carriage fees to networks.) That change in emphasis probably won’t come this year or next, but investor pressure might call for some change in tone sooner than planned.

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Cable, Innovative? You Don't Say!

Cable, Innovative? You Don't Say! | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The digital revolution, as much the cablers are trying to point it in a different direction, blows up the franchise system. It blows up the economic link between owning infrastructure and acquiring and reselling programming on advantageous terms. Except for the difficulty of untangling the current pattern of contractual programming rights, nothing today is stopping a Netflix or DirecTV or Amazon from offering a "virtual" cable TV service to anybody on the planet based on a broadband app. Then again, we might not even need programming aggregators in the future. Owners of the most coveted programming, whether the NCAA, Paramount Studios or Disney, might prefer to offer their own apps, and in three flavors: subscription, pay-per-view and ad-supported.
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