TV Everywhere
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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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Apple Is Going To Anger A Lot Of Big Media Companies With AirPlay On The Mac

Apple Is Going To Anger A Lot Of Big Media Companies With AirPlay On The Mac | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

One of the coolest features in Apple's new desktop operating system, Mountain Lion, is AirPlay.  AirPlay already exists for the iPad and iPhone, but this version appears to be extend what AirPlay can do.  This new version is going to make life much better for users, and much less comfortable for big media companies.  If you're unfamiliar with AirPlay, here's how it works. You can wirelessly beam what's on the screen of your iPhone, iPad, or Mac to your TV, if you have an AppleTV, and have it running through your HDTV.  With Mountain Lion, this means you can send "webpages, YouTube videos, iTunes rentals, Keynote presentations, or anything else you can think of onto an HDTV without any added wires," says Jason Snell at MacWorld, who had some time to demo Mountain Lion.  If this is accurate, and you really can send webpages to your TV, it should scare the crap out of media companies who are doing everything they can to prevent themselves from being disrupted by TV on the internet.  If you can easily beam Safari to your TV, it makes pirated video streams that much more attractive. You can watch them on the big screen with ease.  It will also fluster Hulu. Hulu blocks Boxee and GoogleTV from broadcasting Hulu, even though both of them are web-based. There is code in GoogleTV and Boxee that tips off Hulu about what people are using.  Why does Hulu do this? We're not entirely sure, but it seems like Hulu's corporate parents don't like the idea of people watching free shows on big screen TVs. It's too similar to regular TV, without generating enough revenue. To solve the revenue problem, Hulu wants people to pay for Hulu Plus, which gives access to different devices.  Hulu isn't alone in blocking Google TV. ABC, CBS, NBC and all other media sites block it too.  With AirPlay, they won't know what's what. It will just be a Safari or Chrome or Firefox browser. And users will be able to get the big screen experience.

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Time Warner Cable Streams Live TV To PCs, Macs

Time Warner Cable Streams Live TV To PCs, Macs | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Time Warner Cable is extending its live TV streaming service for in-home viewing on personal computers, although as with the original iPad version Viacom's networks are excluded from the 100-plus channel lineup.  The operator is calling the PC and Mac service, which is powered by Microsoft's Silverlight media-delivery software, a beta test. TWC customers can access the service at www.twctv.com.  Cablevision Systems, which offers in-home TV via apps for iPads and iPhones, also is testing a Silverlight-powered service for PCs and Macs.  In addition to live TV, the TWC TV service provides up to seven days of searchable TV listings, a "Watch on TV" button to change the channel on a set-top box; DVR management features; and the ability to manage favorite channels, parental controls and closed-captioning settings for the website's video player.  "Ever since launching the TWC TV app for the iPad, we've been expanding the platforms that our customers can use to get value from their video subscription, and this represents the latest star in that particular constellation," director of digital communications Jeff Simmermon wrote in a blog post...

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HBO Go Now Playing On Samsung TVs, But Not For Comcast And TWC

HBO Go Now Playing On Samsung TVs, But Not For Comcast And TWC | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

HBO's "TV Everywhere" service is now available on Samsung's Internet-connected HDTVs -- but customers of Comcast and Time Warner Cable can't access the feature today.  The two biggest U.S. cable operators also block access to HBO Go on Roku's Internet set-tops, while they do allow subscribers to access the service via PCs, Apple iPads and mobile phones.  Meanwhile, DirecTV is allowing customers to log in to HBO Go on Samsung TVs, but like Comcast and TWC the satellite TV company hasn't given the green light to Roku. DirecTV did not immediately provide an explanation for why the Samsung TVs are OK but the Roku boxes are not.  According to sources familiar with Comcast and Time Warner Cable's positions, HBO has not yet agreed to all of the conditions the MSOs require of their TV Everywhere partners, such as how subscriber information is handled on third-party devices and websites... 

On Time Warner Inc.'s Feb. 8 earnings call, CEO Jeff Bewkes urged the industry to make cable content available on as many devices as possible -- as quickly as possible.  "Frankly, I don't understand the reticence of distributors to authenticate on third-party sites like Roku and get HBO and TNT and all of those channels to television," Bewkes said. "As a general principle, we, as an industry, should be making viewers have availability with on-demand TV of all of their favorite networks on any platform, any device that they want to use. ... That's how you fulfill the promise of your brands and of television to viewers. And I'm hopeful that the industry will move pretty quickly past some of its -- I think their more minor concerns that they have, and they ought to speed up."

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Aereo to deliver 20 broadcast channels, DVR to New Yorkers with iPad, Kindle Fire, mobile phones

Aereo to deliver 20 broadcast channels, DVR to New Yorkers with iPad, Kindle Fire, mobile phones | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Aereo plans to launch a technology platform on March 14 which will allow New York City residents to watch and record programming from 20 broadcast networks on PCs, tablets and mobile phones, including Apple's (Nasdaq: AAPL) iPad and Amazon's (Nasdaq: AMZN) Kindle Fire.  Aereo is also compatible with Roku and Apple TV, and may appeal to cable cord-cutters that could use those Internet video set-tops to watch live TV channels.  Formerly known as Bamboom, Aereo was founded by advanced advertising and cable technology whiz Chet Kanojia, who sold Navic Networks to Microsoft (Nasdaq: MSFT) in 2008. Navic developed targeted advertising technology that it licensed to Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC), Charter Communications (Nasdaq: CHTR), Cox Communications and other cable MSOs. According to an invitation Aereo sent to reporters, Kanojia plans to detail Aereo's strategy at a press conference Tuesday morning that will feature IAC chairman Barry Diller, who is expected to announce that he backing Aereo.  Targeting "urban mobile" consumers who may want to cut the cord on pay TV subscriptions, Aereo has developed TV antennas that are smaller than a fingernail, and will link hundreds of thousands of the antennas at data centers to storage devices and Web servers that can deliver video that is converted to HTML5 to viewers in New York. Aereo will also incorporate social TV viewing...

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BSkyB's internet TV plan is brilliant, a rare example of perfect timing

BSkyB's internet TV plan is brilliant, a rare example of perfect timing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

On the internet, it's always better to jump before you're pushed... Equally, though, timing matters. Ten years ago I recall mobile phone companies that had just spend billions on 3G bids demonstrating to journalists how the latest handsets could stream TV direct to their mobiles. It was great, if you wanted to watch something that looked like the first moon landing viewed on a TV across a road. TV on mobiles didn't take off; music did. But now we have the bandwidth and processing power to give us video capability all over the place. And what I think is the most impressive case of jumping before being pushed in the media ecosystem recently: BSkyB's announcement that it's going to launch an internet TV service that will let you get content from it on an ad hoc basis, no matter whether you use Sky's broadband or pay for Sky in your home.  In essence, Sky is doing with its TV output what Amazon does with the Kindle: saying "we don't mind how you view our content. We just want to be the conduit so we benefit from your attention." Video-on-demand (VoD) for anyone prepared to pay, not just existing users of its pay TV service.

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Barriers fall between TV, Internet

...Some entrepreneurs are toying with new models that tap into an Internet specialty - the ability to tailor choices to the individual viewer - that might give advertisers a better platform on the Internet than they have in one-size-fits-all cable TV audiences.  But true Internet TV is facing a big obstacle: It's the old-school cable and cable-like services, after all, that have got the makers of programming locked up in mega-contracts.

"There's technology, and then there's commerce," said Jim Barry of the Consumer Electronics Association. "The technology is ahead."  Commerce, meanwhile, hasn't fully figured out the best way to make a buck off Internet video...

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Redbox Partners With Verizon To Launch Streaming Video Service | Fast Company

Redbox Partners With Verizon To Launch Streaming Video Service | Fast Company | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Coinstar subsidiary Redbox today announced a new partnership with Verizon for the launch of a streaming video service. The joint venture will launch in second half of 2012 and be a subscription-based and "affordable service that will allow all consumers across the U.S. to enjoy the new and popular entertainment they want, whenever they choose, using the media and devices they prefer," the companies said in a statement.  With the new service, Coinstar better positions its primary business for the digital age. Redbox's kiosks, generally located at grocery or retail stores such as Walmart, offer customers dollar-a-day DVD or video game rentals. With the addition of a streaming service and its new-fledged partnership with Verizon, Redbox now further complicates a crowded field of digital streaming juggernauts that include Netflix, Amazon, and Hulu.

... Details of the partnership are still sparse. The companies only indicated they plan to introduce a "product portfolio" and will offer "subscription services." It's unclear what these services are; how or whether they will be bundled with Redbox's kiosk business or Verizon's VOD services; what content these services might provide; or how much it'll cost.

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Chase Carey: Not impressed with TV Everywhere

Chase Carey: Not impressed with TV Everywhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

News Corp. prexy and chief operating officer Chase Carey vented frustrations with the industry's TV Everywhere efforts at the D:Dive Into Media conference Tuesday.  Carey didn't mince words on how badly he believes cable, satellite and telcos have botched extending program viewing to digital platforms at no extra charge to subscribers who access content via authentication.  "I'd say authentication is a pretty poor execution to date," said Carey at the confab in Laguna Niguel, Calif. hosted by Dow Jones' AllThingsD website. "The process is way too difficult, way too unfriendly."  Carey's harsh assessment -- he later referred to the TV Everywhere user experience as a "pain in the neck" -- represented a notable dissent from industrywide support for authentication, which is seen as a defensive maneuver to help cablers and satcasters compete against digital upstarts like Netflix.  But TV Everywhere has been criticized in recent years despite repeated support from high-profile advocates like Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes for its slow rollout and chilly consumer reception.  Said Carey, "I'm frustrated by the progress to date or lack thereof in terms of making authentication something of a friendly user experience."

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NBC Puts the Super Bowl on the Web Because It Thinks You’ll Watch It on TV

NBC Puts the Super Bowl on the Web Because It Thinks You’ll Watch It on TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Super Bowl is the most valuable show on TV. Which is why NBC can charge a reported $3.5 million for a 30-second spot during the Giants-Patriots game this Sunday.  But if you watch the game on the Web, your eyeballs are worth a whole lot less. NBC, which is streaming the entire thing for the first time ever, will be lucky to get anything near a million dollars for that same ad when it runs online.  So why is Comcast’s broadcast network putting the game on the Web, period? Isn’t this the classic analog-dollars-to-digital-dimes trade that Big Media strives so hard to avoid?  Nope, says Rick Cordella, who runs digital for NBC Sports. The network assumes that nearly every eyeball — and every ad dollar — that it gets from the Web this week will be a bonus, because whoever watches online is simultaneously watching on a big TV, the way football is supposed to be watched.  This is supposed to be the classic “second screen” experience that Twitter’s Dick Costolo and so many other digital folks are excited about.  And that makes plenty of sense to me. Many TV guys have gotten plenty comfortable with the idea of streaming their most valuable live sports events online, for free. In most of those cases, the general assumption is that anyone who’s watching on the Web is someone who can’t watch the game on a TV to begin with — see the CBS/Turner Sports livestreams of the NCAA March Madness tournament.  And in NBC’s case, it is packing the Webcast full of extra camera angles and other goodies, including a feature that will let you rewatch every Super Bowl commercial once it’s aired. The assumption is that you’re holding the TV remote in one hand, and controlling your laptop with another.

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A Virtual MSO Shall Rise, Boxee CEO Says

The United States's first virtual MSO will materialize later this year, giving broadband devices a new way to deliver on-demand and live subscription TV services directly to consumers, predicts Boxee CEO Avner Ronen.  The prediction came up during a discussion with Light Reading Cable about a week after Boxee started shipping a component that feeds over-the-air digital TV broadcasts to the Boxee Box. (See Boxee Tees Up Live TV Cord-Cutting Tool .)  But Boxee has no interest in becoming a virtual MSO itself. That's an expensive proposition that reportedly scared off even the deep-pocketed Microsoft Corp. (Nasdaq: MSFT), which opted instead for pay-TV partnerships that send content to the Xbox 360. (See Microsoft Puts Pay-TV Plan on Pause and Comcast, Verizon Connect With the Xbox 360.)  "We don't have an appetite to become a virtual MSO in the sense of us going out and licensing those channels and providing ... guarantees and so on," Ronen says. "We'd much rather [have] somebody like Comcast Corp. (Nasdaq: CMCSA, CMCSK) or DirecTV Group Inc. (NYSE: DTV) or Netflix Inc. (Nasdaq: NFLX) or Amazon.com Inc. (Nasdaq: AMZN) do those deals and for us to support those over-the-top offerings on our platform like we do today for traditional over-the-top."  Still, Ronen thinks there's a good chance that someone, perhaps an incumbent pay-TV player, will try the virtual MSO model this year.

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TV Everywhere Will Overshadow Hulu and YouTube

TV Everywhere Will Overshadow Hulu and YouTube | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

In the long term, place your bets on TV content. Hulu is glomming ad dollars and YouTube has traffic and now more original content. But according to a new research note from Needham’s analyst Laura Martin, those are small potatoes compared to the ad money TV media will bring with its content across platforms.  “We estimate that the rollout of TV Everywhere over the next 3-5 years could add approximately $12 billion of revenue annually to the U.S. television ecosystem,” says Martin. Not only will this scale “dwarf” current digital entities like Hulu and YouTube, but she sees this revenue as low risk and additive rather than cannibalistic of the TV business.  The lion’s share of this new revenue will be realized in advertising -- up to $10 billion a year, as content owners sell across TV, Web, smartphone and tablets. She also sees more revenue coming through the pipes, with the cable, satellite and telco delivery systems that could have the capability of charging for added value.  “We believe that TV Everywhere will be one of the primary drivers of valuation growth for today’s TV ecosystem over the next five years,” says the report.

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SkyGrid Debuts iPad App Touchtv To Allow Users To Watch Content On Demand

SkyGrid Debuts iPad App Touchtv To Allow Users To Watch Content On Demand | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

SkyGrid, a startup that offers a powerful news aggregator to consumers is venturing into the TV content and media business with the launch of Touchtv, an iPad app that allows viewers to watch recent programs from popular sports, entertainment, politics, and news channels.  Custom designed for the iPad, Touchtv, which is a free app, aims to give viewers their own personal TV via the iPad to watch their favorite channels. SkyGrid has partnered with a number of networks including Fox, CBS, ABC, NBC, ESPN, OWN, E! and others to show specific content and programming.  You can simply launch Touchtv on your iPad and “touch” any channel to start watching. From the Home Screen viewers can watch their channels and personalize their TV. As SkyGrid CEO Kevin Pomplun explains to me, Touchtv aims to replicate an identical experience to watching TV and flipping through channels. Unlike Hulu, Netflix, or others, Touchtv not trying to provide full sitcoms or games, but instead is trying to give users the channel watching experience.

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BSkyB Posts Record Profits, Touts New U.K.-Wide Internet TV Service

BSkyB Posts Record Profits, Touts New U.K.-Wide Internet TV Service | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The pay TV platform announced new plans for a broadband TV service taking on Netflix and LoveFilm later this year. BSkyB posted record first-half operating profits up 16 percent to £601 million ($986 million) on revenues up 6 percent to $5.6 billion and announced new plans to launch a U.K.-wide TV streaming service Tuesday.  CEO Jeremy Darroch – who announced yesterday that Sky had struck streaming TV deals with the BBC’s i-Player service and with ITV’s catch-up platform ITVPlayer – said that later this year it plans to launch a broadband Internet TV service to all homes in the U.K.  Currently its services are available to only the 10.5 million homes that subscribe to its own services but the new subscription based service will target the 13 million plus homes who are not Sky subscribers.  “Alongside the continued growth of our satellite platform this will be a new way for us to reach out to consumers who may not want the whole Sky service.”

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When does sharing become stealing?

When does sharing become stealing? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...What is clear is that there is no current set of best practices for TV Everywhere authentication. Those operators who provide multiple accounts generally seem to limit each one to one simultaneous login per stream. Other operators enable users to log in only with the master account, generally to ensure that subscribers won’t want to also share their billing information, usage data and parental controls with others. But they will allow multiple simultaneous streams on that account. Others will have one stream and one account. It is the Wild West out there, possibly for good reason.  

The password-sharing phenomenon:  So how prevalent are these shared accounts? At this point, probably not very. For now, I am probably the exception rather than the rule — but I’m sure I’m not alone.  Anecdotal evidence tells me that subscribers to video services tend to share within a household or among a group of friends regardless of the price. I have seen friends share usage of a Netflix or Hulu Plus account. More surprisingly, some friends who share tend not to expect payment back in return for shared access.  But that’s just $7.99 per month for a range of older library content. What happens when you are charging upward of $100 for cable access and are offering up content that is only available with a cable subscription? HBO shows, for example, are only available on DVD and Blu-ray long after a season ends, generally about a month or so before a new season begins. And you won’t find them anywhere online unless you have a TV Everywhere account. But if you do, you will be able to watch episodes the next day and increasingly on the device of your choice.  

A problem for the college generation?  For now, sharing of TV Everywhere accounts is still limited to those who know what those services are, and the industry as a whole still has a long way to go to educate their customers about the streaming content they have access to. But there is one demographic that seems perfectly situated to take advantage of TV Everywhere logins: college students.  As a whole, college kids are tech-savvy, watch content on multiple platforms, and generally don’t have a lot of disposable income. Moreover, they don’t have a lot of choice when it comes to whatever content is available through their university dorm’s cable offering. So being able to keep tabs on some of their favorite cable programming while away from home can be a value-add, indeed.  One cable network spokesperson who wished to remain anonymous told me it is not necessarily a bad thing for college students to have access while at school. After all, it only drives interest in the programming when they graduate and get their first jobs. But the question remains whether TV Everywhere will eventually convert them to become paying cable customers when they graduate or if they will continue to use Mom and Dad’s account. That is something big cable might have to worry about, especially as the cost of services continues to increase...

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Digital Services Seek a Captive Consumer

Digital Services Seek a Captive Consumer | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

... The biggest tech companies are no longer content simply to enhance part of your day. They want to erase the boundaries, do what the other big tech companies are doing and own every waking moment. The new strategy is to build a device, sell it to consumers and then sell them the content to play on it. And maybe some ads too.  Last week’s news that Google is preparing its first Google-branded home entertainment device — a system for streaming music in the house — might seem far afield for an Internet search and advertising company, but fits solidly into a industrywide goal in which each tech company would like to be all things to all people all day long.  “It’s not about brands or devices or platforms anymore,” said Michael Gartenberg, an analyst at Gartner. “It’s about the ecosystem. The idea is to get consumers tied into that ecosystem as tightly as possible so they and their content are locked into one system.”

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Tom George's comment, February 12, 2012 10:37 PM
Nice find Peter and so true. Thanks for this today.
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Exclusive: Half of Internet TVs Aren't Connected

Exclusive: Half of Internet TVs Aren't Connected | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...Every major TV-maker — LG, Panasonic, Samsung and others — offers sets with Wi-Fi and apps to access video services like Netflix, music sites like Pandora and social networks like Twitter.

But that doesn’t mean people are doing it.  "People are buying connected TVs, but they are not all using them," said Norm Bogen, vice president for digital entertainment at research firm NPD In-Stat. In fact, according to a survey that In-Stat shared exclusively with TechNewsDaily, only half of all people who own Internet-capable TVs have actually gotten them online.

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Nielsen: Number of homes subscribing to cable decreasing

Nielsen: Number of homes subscribing to cable decreasing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Americans are still watching plenty of TV programming (maybe too much for their own good), but how they’re going about it is changing.  The migration from the traditional cable television setup to Internet-connected options (whether it be a computer, mobile device or just the TV itself) with streaming video subscriptions isn’t happening drastically or overnight.  But the shifts in behavior and how people are spending their money on digital media is still significant.  According to a new survey from Nielsen Wire, homes with broadband Internet and free, broadcast TV are becoming a growing trend, increasing by 22.8 percent during the last year.  Sure, they represent only less than five percent of U.S. households with TVs, but Nielsen found that this demographic tended to stream video twice as much as the general population and watch half as much TV. That’s a big deal for online advertisers as well as the content providers, whether it be the digital media services (i.e. Netflix) or the networks and movie studios.

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Amazon hiring creative execs for original programming

Amazon hiring creative execs for original programming | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...While Netflix, Hulu and YouTube have already introduced their own original programming, the Amazon Studios project preceded all of those other initiatives. However, while Netflix, YouTube and others are sourcing their programming from professional production companies, Amazon took a different approach with its studio plans — it’s crowd-sourcing scripts and projects from a community of artists and optioning them for free.

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Boxee clashes with cable companies over encryption

Boxee clashes with cable companies over encryption | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Boxee’s live TV dongle has only been available for a few weeks, but the company is already embroiled in a fight with cable giants like Comcast and Time Warner Cable over it, and is now getting support from groups like Public Knowledge and the Consumer Electronics Association.  At the core of the issue is whether cable companies should be allowed to encrypt their basic cable programming, something that existing regulation doesn’t allow. Unencrypted signals can be used by tuners built into most modern TV sets as well as equipment like Boxee’s live TV tuner to access these basic cable channels straight from the coax cable that comes out of your wall, without the need for any set-top box.  Cable companies have asked the FCC for waivers to these restrictions, arguing that encrypted channels would reduce piracy and that encrypted cable connections can be remotely serviced, eliminating the need for many service visits. The FCC is currently hearing all sides on the issue as it contemplates whether or not to do away with the restrictions and allow all cable companies to encrypt basic cable. Boxee has filed multiple letters with the commission and met with its staff last week.

On Wednesday, the startup wrote on its blog: “(The cable companies’) real motivation is to prevent you from being able to connect the cable from the wall directly to your TV or Boxee Box. You will need to rent a set-top box from your cable provider, pay an extra $5-$15 per month and it will no longer work with your Boxee Box or similar devices. The cable companies are losing subscribers every quarter. If they want to reverse that trend they should look into building better products, reducing prices and improving customer service, not going to the government asking for rule changes to force consumers into spending more money and blocking start-ups from competing.”

Boxee’s position has been shared by Public Knowledge as well as the Consumer Electronics Association and consumer electronics manufacturers like Hauppauge, which makes the Boxee dongle. The cable companies on the other hand have been getting support from the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) as well as some municipalities, including Miami, Florida.

Altogether, more than 80 documents have been filed with the FCC on the issue. Many of these filings from both sides make it clear that this isn’t just about what’s going to happen to those basic cable channels, but also about the role consumer electronics manufacturers, cable companies and start-ups like Boxee will play in the future of pay TV.

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When TVE Isn’t Everywhere—Challenges of Implementing Service for Smaller MSOs

...For obvious financial reasons and economies of scale, networks go to the larger distributors first. One programmer, which preferred to be unnamed due to ongoing negotiations, said that though TVE should be available to ops regardless of size, “the reality of the technical implementation between operator and programmer is that scale is required in order for this to be a cost effective endeavor.” However, the challenge is not “insurmountable,” and this programmer supports using a third-party solution to get there. “Our understanding is that these conversations are happening, and we are encouraged by this.”

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Internet Threat to Satellite TV | Inside Digital Media

Internet Threat to Satellite TV | Inside Digital Media | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...While “cord-cutting” threatens Cable operators, it is a clear-and-present-danger to Satellite TV systems. That’s because only a small fraction of Satellite TV subscribers also get Internet service via satellite.  The two dominate domestic Satellite TV operators are DirectTV and Dish Networks. In combination they have about 33 million domestic subscribers with an estimated one-third in rural locations. Most subscribers also want Internet access, but Satellite TV operators subcontract Internet access to third parties which are generally telephone companies. Thus, when Satellite TV subscribers choose to bypass Pay TV by metaphorically “cutting-the-Satellite-cord”, they are most often discontinuing Satellite TV service and upgrading ISP service from telephone carriers. Consequently, Satellite TV operators lose the Pay TV subscriber without benefitting by keeping, and upgrading, the Internet subscriber.  Unfortunately satellite-based Internet service is often unable to compete effectively. Since geosynchronous satellites are 22,000 miles distant, the round trip to a file server on the Internet is 88,000 miles. The lengthy round trip combined with sundry routing & processing results in delays of nearly a full second which is a near-eternity in the Internet world. The inherent lag is intolerable for a number of applications such as Voice-over-IP (Skype), Internet gaming, and Virtual Private Networks.

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Synacor Files For IPO, Acquires HTML5 Cloud OS Carbyn For $1.1M

Synacor Files For IPO, Acquires HTML5 Cloud OS Carbyn For $1.1M | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Synacor helps telecom and cable service providers set up websites on its managed, hosted platform where their customers can access ”e-mail, security, online games, music and authentication of TV Everywhere”. That means Synacor already handles all your web-based, and TV services, but is missing what lives on your OS. Carbyn’s OS that can be accessed from anwhere will fill this gap and let Synacor’s clients provide their customers with an expansive set of services in a single-sign on package.

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Forget Hulu and Amazon: What Netflix is worried about is TV Everywhere

Forget Hulu and Amazon: What Netflix is worried about is TV Everywhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

“As we’ve often said, we see the biggest long term threat as TV Everywhere, and in particular, HBO GO, the leading implementation of TV Everywhere to date. HBO has some great content, particularly their original series, but today for most people it is locked behind a linear interface, or at best, behind a DVR interface and in all cases tethered to a linear subscription plan. As HBO GO grows and becomes the primary way that consumers experience HBO, it will become a much more effective competitor for viewing time.  Similarly, Showtime’s TV Everywhere application is very impressive and just starting to gain traction. Every major network is investing in their Internet application, on tablets, smart TVs, phones, game consoles, and laptops. Pricing is simple: the consumer just authenticates with their MVPD provider.  Over the next few years, UIs will evolve in astounding ways, such as allowing viewers to watch eight simultaneous games on ESPN, color coding where the best action is in a given moment or allowing Olympics fans the ability to control their own slow-motion replays. A decade from now, choosing a linear feed from a broadcast grid of 200 channels will seem like using a rotary dial telephone,” Netflix’s managers wrote....

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Cable Exec: Future Distribution Deals May Embrace TV Everywhere

Cable Exec: Future Distribution Deals May Embrace TV Everywhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

TV Everywhere deals for TV networks might be part of TV distribution deals in the future with cable, satellite and telco TV program package providers, says a Discovery Communications executive.  Brad Singer, senior executive vice president/CFO of Discovery Communications, commenting on a recent big TV media company/cable operator deal, says TV Everywhere components "appear to be going in an overall package." Speaking at the CitiCorp media conference, he cautions that each network and multichannel TV operator will have their own priorities.

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Brooklyn-Based SocialGuide, a TV Guide for the Twitter Era, Is Raising a $500K. Debt Round

Brooklyn-Based SocialGuide, a TV Guide for the Twitter Era, Is Raising a $500K. Debt Round | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

SocialGuide, a startup that determines what TV shows and movies are popular by combing Twitter and Facebook, is in the process of raising a $500,000 debt round, according to the company’s latest SEC filing via FormDs.com...

The Brooklyn-based service, located at 68 Jay Street in Dumbo, bills itself as “the first real-time Social Programming Guide.” By ranking what’s popular on social networks, according to keywords counts, and then surfacing “the shows that your friends are talking about,” the company is able to recommend what’s worth watching. No more hearing about the “Downtown Abbey” Christmas special a week after everyone else tumbled their favorite Dowager Countess-isms. In September, SocialGuide, which previously went by the name Talkwit, introduced a similar service for movies, which is currently in beta. But its real value may be in data it collects about the budding field of social TV. Mr. Casey said the financing would be used to support new hires and revenue-generating products SocialGuide is planning to push in the near future. That includes an upcoming social TV data analytics and audience engagement platform called SocialGuide Intelligence that it will be launching along “with major cable networks.” SocialGuide is also launching API solutions used by third-parties to power social TV guides on set-top boxes, connected TVs, and second-screen applications, like a cable provider’s iPad app. Its Social TV APIs will include, “Guide, Streams, and Meta Content and Recommendations,” said Mr. Casey.

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