TV Everywhere
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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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How Netflix wants to change television forever

How Netflix wants to change television forever | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Netflix doesn’t just want to compete with traditional pay TV networks like HBO, Showtime and Starz – it wants to change television forever. The company envisions a future for TV in which old-fashioned things like ratings, schedule and recaps simply don’t matter anymore.

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What's Going to Kill the TV Business?

What's Going to Kill the TV Business? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...What's going to kill the TV business, or at least challenge it, isn't Apple designing the perfect remote or Microsoft designing a superior guide. It's two things.

First is the rising cost of entertainment, which is happening right now. The sitcoms and great dramas you love cost more to produce every year because they're labor intensive. Sports rights are seeing even worse inflation. ESPN recently signed a deal with the NFL to pay 73% more each year for Monday Night Football. So Comcast and its ilk are stuck between rising programming costs and flat-lining middle class wages. That's a problem, and eventually something has to give. But in the short term, providers can merge and channels can be cut and costs can be saved. Expensive shows and sports rights shouldn't destroy the TV business on their own.

Combined with a second trend -- the accelerating exodus of attention away from television -- the TV business might really be in trouble. But this second trend is still more of a projection than a reality. One hundred million households still pay for a bundle of networks. That number isn't really going down. With the pace of household formation tripling in the last year, it could even go up. The number of cord-cutters -- households that have replaced the bundle with over-the-Internet video like Netflix -- is in the low single-digit millions. TV-providers have even found a hedge against cord cutting. They've become Internet-providers and expanded overseas to make up the revenue they're not making here. Cord-cutting is a marginal trend that could sneakily turn mainstream, creating an innovator's dilemma for TV and cable. But not yet.

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Time Warner Cable: How about some TV with your Netflix?

Time Warner Cable: How about some TV with your Netflix? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Tail, meet dog: Time Warner Cable is currently sending a mailer to internet-only customers, suggesting that they should upgrade their broadband speeds for a better Netflix experience and offering to throw in a whole year of free TV as a bonus.  How about some TV with your Netflix? Time Warner Cable’s latest mailer to Internet-only customers.  Why is this remarkable? Because not too long ago, cable companies viewed TV services as their main money maker and broadband as an added service. The Time Warner Cable offer doesn’t just turn this model on its head, it also puts the focus squarely on Netflix as one of the main reasons people would want fast internet access.  Of course, Netflix has been blamed by some in the industry as a reason why people would cut the cord and go internet-only in the first place. For these cord cutters, an ad like this may actually be a smart thing: Instead of making them feel like they’re subscribing to an expensive TV bundle, Time Warner Cable is putting the emphasis squarely on Netflix, a service Internet-only users likely already enjoy...

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London 2012 — NBC Signup Needed to Stream Olympics

London 2012 — NBC Signup Needed to Stream Olympics | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

This edition of the Summer Games promises to be different from past Olympics, and it might be a real boon for viewers. Every stream from every sport from London will be live. There will be no dilly-dallying as there was two years ago at the Vancouver Winter Games when NBC streamed only hockey and curling live on its site. But as usual, the opening and closing ceremonies will be tape-delayed until prime time. In all, there will be 3,500 hours of live streaming video. Few will watch them all (is it possible, I wonder?), but they will be there. Still, whatever you watch, at whatever time, you will want to be able to dip into it without encountering any access problems. “Sure, we have fears that people who are asked to take an action, to click for access, are going to be deterred,” said Gary Zenkel, the president of NBC Olympics. “We learned two years ago that the consumer needs more education.” He said customers have, over that time, learned to verify their accounts for other content.

“A portion of the population is getting comfortable,” he added.

Verification (or authorization) should be easy and quick. It looks simple in the short demonstration video starring Carson Daly that NBC has sent to cable, satellite and telephone company providers: Go to nbcolympics.com /LiveExtra. From a drop-down menu, choose the cable, satellite or telephone company you have an account with. The next step depends on where you subscribe (and if you’re on a digital tier that includes MSNBC and CNBC, which is nearly everyone’s). Generally, you will have to enter the user name and password that corresponds to your account to verify your computer, mobile device or tablet. If all works well, you will never have to verify again. But Comcast and Cablevision have developed ways to speed the process. When Comcast Xfinity and Cablevision Optimum broadband customers identify themselves on the NBC Olympic site from their home computers, their accounts will be recognized and automatically verified without the entering of user names and passwords. “We wanted to create a frictionless environment and remove obstacles to let them get to the Olympic content,” said Amalia O’Sullivan, Cablevision’s vice president for broadband product operations. “We know that for a very condensed period time, and for a broad base of customers, there would be great interest in this product.”...

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NBC, Adobe App to Live-Stream Olympic Games

NBC, Adobe App to Live-Stream Olympic Games | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Olympic Games are weeks away, and NBC is teaming up with Adobe for two apps that will provide easy access to game details as well as live streaming from London.  The free Adobe AIR-powered apps - NBC Olympics Live Extra and NBC Olympics - are now available for iOS and Android. The first will allow for live streaming of more than 3,500 hours of Olympic content, while the second provides more indepth details about the athlethes, the games, and more.  In a nod to the TV Everywhere model, access to the "vast majority" of streaming content will be limited to U.S. users with a pay TV subscription. In order to watch, users will be asked to sign in with their cable login, whether that is Time Warner Cable, Comcast, Cablevision, or a smaller regional provider.  Ashley Still, director of product management for Video Solutions at Adobe, said that 97 percent of all households that pay for TV can access the live streaming content. If you're at home and also get Internet access via your TV provider, the app will automatically recognize that you are allowed to watch the live streaming content.  Those who don't currently have a login for their cable provider can contact the company; NBC has a list of contact numbers on its website. The same authentication can be used across multiple devices...

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Consumer Awareness of ‘TV Everywhere’ Lagging | Home Media Magazine

Consumer Awareness of ‘TV Everywhere’ Lagging | Home Media Magazine | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Cable, satellite and Telco operators reluctant to up resources to facilitate wider user adoption of on-demand video entertainment, analyst says.  Mainstream consumers remain indifferent about TV Everywhere, due in part to cautious efforts by media companies and cable, satellite and telecommunications operators to educate subscribers about accessing content on demand over the Internet through connected devices, an analyst said.  Just 20% of pay-TV subscribers were aware of TV Everywhere provided by their operator in the first quarter of 2012, with 53% of those subscribers using the service at least once a month, according to data presented in a June 21 webinar by Parks Associates.  TV Everywhere is a platform designed to attract and retain pay-TV subscribers in an era of competing (and less expensive) over-the-top alternatives such as Netflix, Hulu, Google Plus and Amazon Prime.  “Is anybody watching these [TV Everywhere] services? Do they even know that these services are available?” asked Parks senior analyst Brett Sappington. “What we found is that by and large the answer is no.”

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TV in real dime

No one disagrees that the next generation of TV must span multiple devices and deliver content wherever people want it. But a gulf remains between those who believe the industry risks being left behind as consumer viewing habits shift, and those who argue that a workable economic model must be firmly in place from the get-go. There’s an underlying tension about who, ultimately, controls the customer experience — and about how to make money in an anytime, anywhere, any-device world.  And it’s not just Hulu making it tougher for cable-cutters to stream shows and other content.  Fox, owned by News Corp., which also owns The Post, is expected to begin talks soon with Comcast on a TV Everywhere deal that will require authentication. Plus, Philadelphia-based Comcast is expected to switch to an authentication model for this summer’s Olympic Games (see story at right).  The move toward authentication is fueled by cable companies and networks looking to protect and profit from their content...

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Why ‘TV Everywhere’Still Isn't Everywhere

No one disagrees that the next generation of TV must span multiple devices and deliver content wherever people want it. But a gulf remains between those who believe the industry risks being left behind as consumer viewing habits shift, and those who argue that a workable economic model must be firmly in place from the get-go. There’s an underlying tension about who, ultimately, controls the customer experience — and about how to make money in an anytime, anywhere, any-device world.

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OATC Announces "Online Multimedia Authorization Protocol"

OATC Announces "Online Multimedia Authorization Protocol" | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...The OMAP specification will benefit stakeholders in the online subscription content ecosystem:

-- Multimedia content publishers and distributors will reduce unauthorized access to content, share a common architecture to minimize operational overhead and cost and provide consumers with
standardized, secure access to media content over the Internet using their home and mobile devices and client software.

-- Technology vendors and third-party service providers can develop value-added services and commercial solutions to deploy across the entire subscription content ecosystem.

-- Consumers get choice, convenience and a simple and consistent experience, unlike today's proprietary solutions.

"OATC [Open Authentication Technology Committee] is creating the open standards needed to enable simple online access to subscription TV services by bridging the gaps in existing technology with practical and workable solutions," said Glenn Reitmeier, OATC president. "We are very excited to announce this preview of our first of several standards to come that will help MVPDs and programmers give their subscribers more choices than ever before." The OATC is inviting the public to download (http://www.oatc.us/Standards/Download.aspx ) the draft specification and provide comments by May 4, 2012.

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Tryphoon's comment, April 6, 2012 7:04 PM
We're co-authors!
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Plans for “TV Everywhere” Bog Down in Tangled Pacts

It was dubbed “TV Everywhere.” But for many TV viewers, it has had trouble going anywhere. Nearly three years after Time Warner Inc. and Comcast Corp. kicked off a drive to make cable programming available online for cable subscribers, the idea of TV Everywhere remains mired in technical holdups, slow deal-making and disputes over who will control TV customers in the future.

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Synacor and Turner Broadcasting Partner to Expand TV Everywhere Initiative

Synacor and Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., have joined forces to enable authorized pay-TV customers web access to live, authenticated 2012 NCAA Division I Men's Basketball Tournament games. Synacor also will integrate Turner's embed video player into select operator portals, providing subscribers with an enhanced online content experience. The collaboration between Turner and Synacor will make it possible to bring the authenticated live games from Turner networks to a broader group of affiliates.

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Four Weird Things the Internet Is Doing to Our Understanding of Television

Four Weird Things the Internet Is Doing to Our Understanding of Television | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...When it comes to delivering audio-visual content to a wide audience, the Internet has lowered the barriers to entry so far that anyone with even the dinkiest camera can become a major broadcaster. The television industry may face a crisis of overhead when a large number of scrappy upstarts deliver comparable value with almost no fixed costs. Also, there are some aspects of the television business that the Internet simply does better, specifically when it comes to reaching an audience.  So there is the scent of blood in the water, and out of the resulting frenzy a few lessons have appeared. Here are four of them.  

- There doesn’t have to be a difference between a “channel” and a “show.”...
- Programming can now be delivered to your television set through a remote control...

- Marketing and distribution are often the same thing...

- Television is no longer that different from publishing...

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When does sharing become stealing?

When does sharing become stealing? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...What is clear is that there is no current set of best practices for TV Everywhere authentication. Those operators who provide multiple accounts generally seem to limit each one to one simultaneous login per stream. Other operators enable users to log in only with the master account, generally to ensure that subscribers won’t want to also share their billing information, usage data and parental controls with others. But they will allow multiple simultaneous streams on that account. Others will have one stream and one account. It is the Wild West out there, possibly for good reason.  

The password-sharing phenomenon:  So how prevalent are these shared accounts? At this point, probably not very. For now, I am probably the exception rather than the rule — but I’m sure I’m not alone.  Anecdotal evidence tells me that subscribers to video services tend to share within a household or among a group of friends regardless of the price. I have seen friends share usage of a Netflix or Hulu Plus account. More surprisingly, some friends who share tend not to expect payment back in return for shared access.  But that’s just $7.99 per month for a range of older library content. What happens when you are charging upward of $100 for cable access and are offering up content that is only available with a cable subscription? HBO shows, for example, are only available on DVD and Blu-ray long after a season ends, generally about a month or so before a new season begins. And you won’t find them anywhere online unless you have a TV Everywhere account. But if you do, you will be able to watch episodes the next day and increasingly on the device of your choice.  

A problem for the college generation?  For now, sharing of TV Everywhere accounts is still limited to those who know what those services are, and the industry as a whole still has a long way to go to educate their customers about the streaming content they have access to. But there is one demographic that seems perfectly situated to take advantage of TV Everywhere logins: college students.  As a whole, college kids are tech-savvy, watch content on multiple platforms, and generally don’t have a lot of disposable income. Moreover, they don’t have a lot of choice when it comes to whatever content is available through their university dorm’s cable offering. So being able to keep tabs on some of their favorite cable programming while away from home can be a value-add, indeed.  One cable network spokesperson who wished to remain anonymous told me it is not necessarily a bad thing for college students to have access while at school. After all, it only drives interest in the programming when they graduate and get their first jobs. But the question remains whether TV Everywhere will eventually convert them to become paying cable customers when they graduate or if they will continue to use Mom and Dad’s account. That is something big cable might have to worry about, especially as the cost of services continues to increase...

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NBC, Verizon Strike TV Everywhere Deal

NBCU has struck a program carriage deal with Verizon FiOS that includes rights to over-the-top delivery to multiple screens.  The wide-ranging deal, announced Monday, includes retransmission of NBC and Telemundo TV stations as well as NBCU cable nets, which include USA, E!, Bravo Media, CNBC, MSNBC,NBC Sports Network, Oxygen Media, Syfy, Telemundo Media and Golf Channel and TV Everywhere rights, which means Verizon can make that programming available for multiplatform viewing by authenticated subs.

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Is a Tablet the Only TV You Need?

Is a Tablet the Only TV You Need? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...While planting your face in front of a tiny screen is perfectly acceptable on trans-Atlantic flights, it can be a little odd at home. But if you give yourself over to the tablet, it's actually a pretty awesome experience. I'm not claiming an iPad beats the big screen, but I will say this: Watching shows and movies on a tablet feels closer to what television viewing should be like in the 21st century than what 21st-century TVs actually deliver.  Yes, there are "smart" televisions that come with Wi-Fi and video-streaming services like Netflix and Hulu Plus baked in, but they feel sluggish compared to tablets. Devices that help bridge the gap between Internet-based content and your living room's television, like Apple TV and the Xbox 360, are pretty excellent, but once you've become accustomed to the speed and intimacy of using something like an iPad to watch your shows and films, it's hard to deal with tech that's not as responsive. Even simple things on a tablet, like briskly flicking through a menu of movies or accurately rewinding with the tip of your finger, can be pleasurable. As the gadgets in our pockets and handbags and briefcases become the most impressive technological objects in our lives, the good ol' TV setups in our homes can feel painfully slow and antiquated.  And what these futuristic slates lack in eye-popping bigness, they make up for in deft portability. Want to watch "Monday Night Football" in your backyard for a more tailgate-like experience? You can do that. Spouse kick you off the big screen to watch "Glee?" Grab the tablet and head to the attic. The tablet can be a marriage saver in one-television households. It's also the best thing to happen to lazy Sunday mornings since breakfast in bed...

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Tablet Viewing Rising In Popularity For Older Viewers, Not Hurting TV Viewing 09/12/2012

TV and movie viewing on tablets by older Americans is quickly rising, according to a new study. The number of tablet owners 55 and older who watch TV and movies weekly on tablets increased from 11 percent last year to 19 percent in 2012, while the number of tablet owners in the 45 to 54 age range who watch weekly rose from 15% to 24%, said strategy consulting firm Altman Vilandrie & Company, based on an online survey conducted in partnership with Research Now.  “The implications for marketers and the future of advertising are profound: video advertising on tablets can be more timely (inserted at time of viewing), more targeted, and more interactive than has yet been possible with TV advertising,” said Jonathan Hurd, author of the study.  What’s particularly interesting about tablet viewing habits is that they don’t seem to be cannibalizing other media. Research firm TDG found that among those in the key 18 to 49 demo who use tablets to watch online TV, 39% said their tablet viewing has led to a rise in their regular TV viewing, while another 46% said they have experienced no change, and only 15% reported a drop in regular TV viewing. Among tablet owners 50 and older, the impact of tablet viewing on regular TV viewing is virtually negligible, TDG found...

 

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Cable Biz Struggles with Divergent Online Strategies

Cable Biz Struggles with Divergent Online Strategies | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...Welcome to the byzantine world of in-season digital syndication, where the inconsistencies that confuse viewers are just as frustrating to distribution execs at top cablers. "If the industry could move faster to establish some kind of uniformity across the board, I think it would absolutely change how programmers would window content in the free, on-demand space," said Denise Denson, exec VP of content distribution and marketing at MTV Networks.  What is delaying the multichannel TV world is a complex web of vested interests ranging from the cable and satellite operators that dictate most of the distribution parameters for programming to the studios that hold onto some of the rights to the content they license to the networks. Then there are the varying off-air marketing strategies, not to mention just old-fashioned indecision.  Programmers face a tough balancing act here. On the one hand, they don't want to cannibalize the aud for premiere telecasts, reruns and even DVR playback within the first three days when advertising revenue is earned. Cablers also need to protect their relationships with operators that pay them a fortune in carriage fees.  On the other hand, programmers want to maximize the exposure of their shows in ways that can drive ratings back to on-air, dilute the appeal of piracy and capitalize on the momentum of online video in general.

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Pay-TV industry not united on TV Everywhere

Pay-TV industry not united on TV Everywhere | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

...differing approaches illustrate a divide in the media industry over how best to put content on the Web while also keeping customers hooked to their TVs.  In 2009, cable giant Comcast Corp.and Time Warner — parent of TNT, TBS, HBO and other popular channels — unveiled TV Everywhere, an initiative that was to be a blueprint for the pay-TV industry to develop a platform to let subscribers watch content on their computers, phones or tablets. The proposition was simple enough: Take all that is good about television — lots of channels at the click of a button — and transfer it online.  The hope was that by offering subscribers more content online, people would be less likely to cut the cord to their cable or satellite TV service in favor of so-called over the top services such as Netflix, Hulu and Roku. TV Everywhere was also meant to discourage programmers from giving away their shows for free online.  But in the three years since it was conceived, TV Everywhere has struggled to gain traction.  "It's simply a mess," BTIG media analyst Rich Greenfield said. "A complete and utter failure."  Andy Heller, vice chairman and TV Everywhere point person for Time Warner's Turner Broadcasting, believes "the real stumbling block has been deals." Some programmers and distributors, Heller said, are using TV Everywhere contract talks as an excuse to try to "change terms and conditions" of other contracts.  Another problem is that neither the programmers nor the pay-TV providers can decide who should be the gatekeeper for content online. Some consumers have to register at multiple networks to watch content, while others can do one-stop shopping through their distributor.  "We're trying to figure out, can you have a single access point?" said Mike Hopkins, president of distribution for Fox Networks. "It's technically complicated but not impossible."

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Connected TV shipments to reach 70%

Connected TV shipments to reach 70% | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Nearly 70% of total TV shipments in 2016 will be for connected TVs, resulting in revenues of more than $117 billion (€88.3 billion), according to a new report by IMS Research.  This contrasts with a global figure of 25% last year and shows, according to the company’s market analyst and author of the Connected TV Sets – World – 2012 report Veronica Thayer, that “internet connectivity is becoming a standard on high-end TV sets, and it’s increasingly being added to mid-end televisions.”  The report also shows that proprietary operating systems will remain the main type used by manufacturers in the next five years, although Android OS will start gaining presence and is expected to reach a significant share of the market by 2014.  It shows that in 2016 more than 80% of the connected TV sets shipped worldwide will have built-in Wi-Fi and close to 30% will have advanced user interface features such as motion, gesture or voice.

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Tom George's comment, May 3, 2012 1:57 PM
Nice curation Peter, do you mainly curate this kind of content?
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Synacor Targets App Economy With Carbyn's HTML5 System

Synacor, a provider of Web portal and TV Everywhere solutions, is promising to make it easier for cable operators, content owners and others to publish device-independent apps with an upcoming platform based on the HTML5 standard.  The company's HTML5 strategy is based on technology it obtained with the $1.1 million acquisition of eight-person Canadian startup Carbyn in January. The idea: to help deliver a unified experience for apps across Internet-connected devices including smartphones, tablets, laptops and connected TVs without having to tailor discrete apps for each individual device type.  "With Carbyn, you develop one HTML5 app and that can live inside one platform," said Jaafer Haidar, Carbyn's co-founder and CEO, is now vice president of mobile for Synacor.  Synacor is initially approaching existing customers, including Verizon Communications, Charter Communications and CenturyLink, about the HTML5 offering. The company plans to show off the Carbyn system at the 2012 Cable Show in Boston next month and is aiming to launch it commercially by the end of 2012. The pricing model for the hosted HTML5 app service has yet to be determined, Haidar said. It could be based on search and advertising revenue, or based on number of active users.  Apps that can run on the Carbyn platform include self-service apps for MSOs that provide "my account" features, bill payment, DVR management, voicemail and other functions, or a range of apps developed by programmers to deliver content, Haidar said. The Carbyn system's features include push notifications and app-to-app communications, and Synacor plans to publish application programming interfaces (APIs) to let third-party developers can take advantage of it.  "The base value of this platform is, we can deliver apps and content to your consumers across any HTML5 device," Haidar said. "Everybody shares the need to become device-agnostic."

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At London Olympics, NBC Says, 'If Cameras Are on It, We'll Stream It'

At London Olympics, NBC Says, 'If Cameras Are on It, We'll Stream It' | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

All 32 sports at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London will be streamed live at nbcolympics.com.  “The hot topic is always, ‘Why don’t you show all your sports live?’” said Rick Cordella, vice president and general manager of NBC Sports Digital Media. “We wanted to take care of that.”  But in reversing a previous policy that did not fully embrace live streaming — the formal announcement will be made Wednesday — there will be a wrinkle to provide a measure of protection for the segment of NBC’s Olympic coverage that is still its most critical: the prime-time broadcast.  An important event like a gold-medal race involving Michael Phelps will be streamed live on nbcolympics.com, but will not be archived on the Web site until sometime after the prime-time show. Other staples of NBC’s prime-time coverage — including swimming, diving, gymnastics, track and field, and beach volleyball — will be treated the same way.  Even so, Mr. Cordella said, “The vast majority of events will be archived immediately.”

The live streaming of every event is a major shift at the NBC Sports Group, which was formed after Comcast acquired control of NBC Universal. Under General Electric, its former owner, NBC Sports did not stream live events that would be featured in prime time, lest they diminish ratings.  Two years ago, at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver, only hockey and curling were streamed live in order to protect prime time. At the 2008 Beijing Summer Games, 25 sports were streamed live but none of them were important to the evening broadcast, which is usually at least four hours long.

“The way consumers consume video has changed over the years,” Mr. Cordella said. “We can’t go back with hindsight and say we were wrong.”

He said that NBC had data to show that live streaming could increase viewership of a event shown hours later on delay. “We’re not scared of cannibalization,” Mr. Cordella said, adding, “Anytime you have a great event that happens before it shows on the air, it increases ratings and generates buzz.”
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Is Intel working on a major TV initiative?

Is Intel working on a major TV initiative? | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Intel has approached media companies with plans to launch a virtual pay TV service, selling subscription bundles over the Internet as opposed to through local cable networks, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal. The move could mark a defiant comeback to the TV space just months after the chip maker shelved a unit that produced CPUs for Google TV and other connected platforms. This time around, Intel apparently wants to do it alone.  The Wall Street Journal is reporting that Intel is planning to launch a service on its own set-top boxes and market it directly to the consumer – a big change in strategy for a company that previously was content with powering third-party products with its own chip sets. The paper has also learned that Intel could launch the service as early as late 2012

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Bewkes: Get on The TV Everywhere Wagon

Time Warner chairman and CEO Jeff Bewkes urged distributors and content providers alike to speed up adoption of TV Everywhere like services, or suffer the consequences in declining subscriber rolls... Bewkes called for all major TV networks to make their content available through TV everywhere, adding that old fears that subscription video on demand would overwhelm the TV business have proven unfounded. He called for all major TV networks to make their content available via authentication, adding that in not doing so they "risk letting others take this opportunity."
"We have not waited to have our affiliate agreements expire and rollover in order to make authenticated, powerful versions of our networks available to consumers," Bewkes continued. "The best way to get paid for TV Everywhere' is to offer it to your viewers. Give it to your viewers today...  Also vital, he added is the ability to measure viewership on all of the various devices.
"Nielsen needs to accelerate its efforts to measure this viewing on more than just the PC," Bewkes said.

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Comcast to Start 'Streampix' Video Service

Comcast to Start 'Streampix' Video Service | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Comcast said on Tuesday that it would start a new video streaming service, its latest effort to keep subscribers happy despite an onslaught of new viewing options.  Called Streampix, the service will give Comcast’s 22.3 million Xfinity cable subscribers access to 75,000 television shows and movies via cellphones, tablets and laptops.

The service is the result of a handful of licensing agreements Comcast has struck with media companies like Disney, Sony Pictures, Warner Brothers and its own NBCUniversal.  As the nation’s largest cable company, Comcast has aggressively led efforts to deliver content on multiple platforms via a subscription model. The effort, known as TVEverywhere, is aimed at keeping customers from canceling the monthly cable bill. Comcast lost 17,000 video customers in the quarter that ended Dec. 31, compared with 135,000 in the same period in 2010.

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Apple Is Going To Anger A Lot Of Big Media Companies With AirPlay On The Mac

Apple Is Going To Anger A Lot Of Big Media Companies With AirPlay On The Mac | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

One of the coolest features in Apple's new desktop operating system, Mountain Lion, is AirPlay.  AirPlay already exists for the iPad and iPhone, but this version appears to be extend what AirPlay can do.  This new version is going to make life much better for users, and much less comfortable for big media companies.  If you're unfamiliar with AirPlay, here's how it works. You can wirelessly beam what's on the screen of your iPhone, iPad, or Mac to your TV, if you have an AppleTV, and have it running through your HDTV.  With Mountain Lion, this means you can send "webpages, YouTube videos, iTunes rentals, Keynote presentations, or anything else you can think of onto an HDTV without any added wires," says Jason Snell at MacWorld, who had some time to demo Mountain Lion.  If this is accurate, and you really can send webpages to your TV, it should scare the crap out of media companies who are doing everything they can to prevent themselves from being disrupted by TV on the internet.  If you can easily beam Safari to your TV, it makes pirated video streams that much more attractive. You can watch them on the big screen with ease.  It will also fluster Hulu. Hulu blocks Boxee and GoogleTV from broadcasting Hulu, even though both of them are web-based. There is code in GoogleTV and Boxee that tips off Hulu about what people are using.  Why does Hulu do this? We're not entirely sure, but it seems like Hulu's corporate parents don't like the idea of people watching free shows on big screen TVs. It's too similar to regular TV, without generating enough revenue. To solve the revenue problem, Hulu wants people to pay for Hulu Plus, which gives access to different devices.  Hulu isn't alone in blocking Google TV. ABC, CBS, NBC and all other media sites block it too.  With AirPlay, they won't know what's what. It will just be a Safari or Chrome or Firefox browser. And users will be able to get the big screen experience.

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