TV Everywhere
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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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TV Everywhere Is Top Of Everyone's Mind | TVNewsCheck.com

TV Everywhere Is Top Of Everyone's Mind | TVNewsCheck.com | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
So far, TV Everywhere has been mostly a video-on-demand service, a way for subscribers to cherry pick their favorite shows to watch on second screens.
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

A robust cross platform measurement system with industry wide acceptance will be the key to driving content availability.

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Bewkes: Get on The TV Everywhere Wagon

Time Warner chairman and CEO Jeff Bewkes urged distributors and content providers alike to speed up adoption of TV Everywhere like services, or suffer the consequences in declining subscriber rolls... Bewkes called for all major TV networks to make their content available through TV everywhere, adding that old fears that subscription video on demand would overwhelm the TV business have proven unfounded. He called for all major TV networks to make their content available via authentication, adding that in not doing so they "risk letting others take this opportunity."
"We have not waited to have our affiliate agreements expire and rollover in order to make authenticated, powerful versions of our networks available to consumers," Bewkes continued. "The best way to get paid for TV Everywhere' is to offer it to your viewers. Give it to your viewers today...  Also vital, he added is the ability to measure viewership on all of the various devices.
"Nielsen needs to accelerate its efforts to measure this viewing on more than just the PC," Bewkes said.

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What Netflix and Hulu Users are Watching… and How

What Netflix and Hulu Users are Watching… and How | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Streaming video online is on the rise in the U.S., and how consumers tune in differs greatly across services. According to a recent Nielsen survey, the majority of Netflix users report watching on a TV screen. In fact, half of all Netflix users connect via a game console (Wii, PS3 or Xbox Live). Conversely for Hulu, watching directly on a computer is the dominant way consumers connect. Eighty-nine percent of Hulu users watch directly on a computer, while 42 percent of Netflix users report watching on their computers.
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In the U.S., Tablets are TV Buddies while eReaders Make Great Bedfellows | Nielsen Wire

In the U.S., Tablets are TV Buddies while eReaders Make Great Bedfellows | Nielsen Wire | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
...When asked how they spent time with their device:
- Tablet owners said 30 percent of their time spent with their device was while watching TV compared to 21 percent lying in bed.
- Smartphone owners say that 20 percent of the time they use their smartphones is while watching TV, compared to 11 percent lying in bed.
- eReader owners indicated only 15 percent of their eReader time was spent watching TV, though they spent a whopping 37 percent of their device usage time in bed.
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Comcast Is Making VOD More Like Live TV

Comcast Is Making VOD More Like Live TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
...The problem is that VOD historically isn’t well tracked or monetized. To get the networks on board, Comcast has had to roll out new features and capabilities that take care of both of those issues. On the reporting front, Comcast is working with Nielsen to get its VOD viewership counted under the same C3 or C7 ratings that are used to track live and on-demand viewing on DVR. That provides broadcasters a “currency” through which they can sell adds against new episodes that appear on VOD shows. Comcast has also been working hard on solving the advertising problem. Until recently, VOD ads were stitched into the video file itself, which provided limited opportunity for monetization. Now Comcast has dynamic ad insertion, which enables content owners to sell new ads against the shows they’re making available through the VOD service. And it’s taking the ad game a step further by providing targeting that isn’t available for most linear broadcasting. Comcast is also allowing broadcasters to disable fast forwarding through advertisements.
The combination of unskipable ads and Nielsen reporting make VOD viewership almost like live TV — which could be a good thing for programmers. Not only could expanded VOD options increase overall viewership and introduce viewers to new shows — thereby potentially increasing linear viewership — but it could increase overall monetization.
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Cord-Cutting Greatly Exaggerated: ESPN Study

According to an ESPN analysis of Nielsen's national people meter household sample, only 0.18% cut the multivideo network cord between fourth quarter 2010 and this year's first quarter, below the rate from the prior quarter.
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How Netflix wants to change television forever

How Netflix wants to change television forever | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Netflix doesn’t just want to compete with traditional pay TV networks like HBO, Showtime and Starz – it wants to change television forever. The company envisions a future for TV in which old-fashioned things like ratings, schedule and recaps simply don’t matter anymore.

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Nielsen: Number of homes subscribing to cable decreasing

Nielsen: Number of homes subscribing to cable decreasing | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Americans are still watching plenty of TV programming (maybe too much for their own good), but how they’re going about it is changing.  The migration from the traditional cable television setup to Internet-connected options (whether it be a computer, mobile device or just the TV itself) with streaming video subscriptions isn’t happening drastically or overnight.  But the shifts in behavior and how people are spending their money on digital media is still significant.  According to a new survey from Nielsen Wire, homes with broadband Internet and free, broadcast TV are becoming a growing trend, increasing by 22.8 percent during the last year.  Sure, they represent only less than five percent of U.S. households with TVs, but Nielsen found that this demographic tended to stream video twice as much as the general population and watch half as much TV. That’s a big deal for online advertisers as well as the content providers, whether it be the digital media services (i.e. Netflix) or the networks and movie studios.

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Americans love their TVs, but flirt with streaming

Americans love their TVs, but flirt with streaming | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Americans are watching more TV than ever, according to Nielsen’s new cross-platform report. The average viewer watched close to four hours of TV every day in the first quarter of this year, or 158 hours and 47 minutes per month, which is up 22 minutes from the first quarter of 2010. People also watch more online video and more video on mobile phones, which leads Nielsen to say that media consumption across all devices is growing. However, this isn’t true for everyone: A subset of people who watch a lot of video on their PCs tend to watch significantly less traditional TV. This trend is especially pronounced in the demographic of 18- to 34-year old viewers. 20 percent of that demographic watch about 27 minutes of online video on their computer on average every day, but only 212.1 minutes of traditional TV.
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Television Ownership Drops in U.S., Nielsen Reports

Television Ownership Drops in U.S., Nielsen Reports | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
The Nielsen Company, which takes TV set ownership into account when it produces ratings, will tell television networks and advertisers on Tuesday that 96.7 percent of American households now own sets, down from 98.9 percent previously. There are two reasons for the decline, according to Nielsen. One is poverty: some low-income households no longer own TV sets, most likely because they cannot afford new digital sets and antennas. The other is technological wizardry: young people who have grown up with laptops in their hands instead of remote controls are opting not to buy TV sets when they graduate from college or enter the work force, at least not at first. Instead, they are subsisting on a diet of television shows and movies from the Internet. That second reason is prompting Nielsen to think about a redefinition of the term “television household” to include Internet video viewers.
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Nielsen to Fix iPad Blind Spot

Nielsen intends to fill an important gap by tracking live TV viewing on iPads by the end of this year or early 2012... "The fact that [iPads are] streaming live TV has our attention,"
The plan, is to bring to the iPad Nielsen's "extended screen model" that's already being used to measure broadband video delivered to PCs and Macs. That will fix an iPad blind spot that has some programmers concerned that they will be penalized if they don't get credit for tablet-based viewing. (See TW Cable, Viacom Take iPad Fight to Court .)
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