TV Everywhere
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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
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Hulu's Sale Could Have Big Implications On the Future of the Web

There has been a lot of speculation over what company will eventually buy premium video service Hulu. With the tenuous relationship between the corporate owners, it is not a matter of if Hulu will sell, but when and to what company. Consumers may not see any significant change to the service when it does eventually sell, but Hulu may hold the keys for the future of a wide range of technology companies and net neutrality. When we looked at the possibilities of who could buy Hulu, the focus was on Web and Internet giants such as Yahoo, Google, Apple, Microsoft, Amazon or AOL. What about the network carriers? On an increasing scale, the cable and cellular networks are getting shut out of value on the content carried through their pipes. This could be a problem for the carriers, content providers and, most importantly, consumers in the not-so-distant future. What does a world of "dumb pipe carriers" look like? What is the optimal balance between "over-the-top" content providers like Netflix and the operators that carry the data?
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Scooped by Peter Rosenberg
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Telcos target OTT traffic

Leading European telecoms companies want to levy significant charges on Google and other online content providers through an overhaul of the regime governing how data travel over the Internet, reports the Financial Times.
The telcos complain that they are contending with an explosion of data on their networks, much of which comes from US sites such as Google’s YouTube video service... they favour the introduction of wholesale charges based on the volume of data traffic passing through their networks, which could result in online content providers making substantial payments to get their video material to consumers. This balance has been undermined by video traffic, much of which comes from the US as well as services such as the BBC’s iPlayer.
This idea is contentious because supporters of net neutrality – the idea that all web content should be treated equally – claim that charging content providers would create a two-tier Internet. The operators’ plans are supposed to preserve the basic, ‘best effort’ Internet, but there would also be a ‘fast lane’ under which content providers could pay to secure prioritised delivery of their material to consumers. The telcos are effectively seeking reforms to so-called ‘peering arrangements’ where historically they entered into agreements that stipulated how they would pass data traffic between each other at interconnection points.
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