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TV Everywhere
Television meets internet, social networks, computing & assorted devices. Hijinx ensue.
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NBC Olympics Unveils Streaming Plans for Sochi

NBC Olympics Unveils Streaming Plans for Sochi | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
Peter Rosenberg's insight:

"...NBC Olympics has continued its efforts to streamline the authentication process with new abilities like In-home auto-verification for some cable/telco customers, cross-domain verification with Adobe Pass, and a longer verification window for users."

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NBC, Adobe App to Live-Stream Olympic Games

NBC, Adobe App to Live-Stream Olympic Games | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Olympic Games are weeks away, and NBC is teaming up with Adobe for two apps that will provide easy access to game details as well as live streaming from London.  The free Adobe AIR-powered apps - NBC Olympics Live Extra and NBC Olympics - are now available for iOS and Android. The first will allow for live streaming of more than 3,500 hours of Olympic content, while the second provides more indepth details about the athlethes, the games, and more.  In a nod to the TV Everywhere model, access to the "vast majority" of streaming content will be limited to U.S. users with a pay TV subscription. In order to watch, users will be asked to sign in with their cable login, whether that is Time Warner Cable, Comcast, Cablevision, or a smaller regional provider.  Ashley Still, director of product management for Video Solutions at Adobe, said that 97 percent of all households that pay for TV can access the live streaming content. If you're at home and also get Internet access via your TV provider, the app will automatically recognize that you are allowed to watch the live streaming content.  Those who don't currently have a login for their cable provider can contact the company; NBC has a list of contact numbers on its website. The same authentication can be used across multiple devices...

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NBC Puts the Super Bowl on the Web Because It Thinks You’ll Watch It on TV

NBC Puts the Super Bowl on the Web Because It Thinks You’ll Watch It on TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

The Super Bowl is the most valuable show on TV. Which is why NBC can charge a reported $3.5 million for a 30-second spot during the Giants-Patriots game this Sunday.  But if you watch the game on the Web, your eyeballs are worth a whole lot less. NBC, which is streaming the entire thing for the first time ever, will be lucky to get anything near a million dollars for that same ad when it runs online.  So why is Comcast’s broadcast network putting the game on the Web, period? Isn’t this the classic analog-dollars-to-digital-dimes trade that Big Media strives so hard to avoid?  Nope, says Rick Cordella, who runs digital for NBC Sports. The network assumes that nearly every eyeball — and every ad dollar — that it gets from the Web this week will be a bonus, because whoever watches online is simultaneously watching on a big TV, the way football is supposed to be watched.  This is supposed to be the classic “second screen” experience that Twitter’s Dick Costolo and so many other digital folks are excited about.  And that makes plenty of sense to me. Many TV guys have gotten plenty comfortable with the idea of streaming their most valuable live sports events online, for free. In most of those cases, the general assumption is that anyone who’s watching on the Web is someone who can’t watch the game on a TV to begin with — see the CBS/Turner Sports livestreams of the NCAA March Madness tournament.  And in NBC’s case, it is packing the Webcast full of extra camera angles and other goodies, including a feature that will let you rewatch every Super Bowl commercial once it’s aired. The assumption is that you’re holding the TV remote in one hand, and controlling your laptop with another.

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NBC iPad App Now Broadcasts Full Episodes

NBC iPad App Now Broadcasts Full Episodes | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

NBC upgraded its iPad app Thursday so users can watch entire shows on their tablets. The network held off on featuring full episodes when the app was first released in June.  Starting Thursday evening, fans can watch all the content available on nbc.com on their NBC iPad app. That includes “pretty much everything” on the network, though the standard is to offer the five most recently aired shows, says Vivi Zigler, president of NBC Universal Digital Entertainment.  Though other networks, notably ABC and CBS, have offered full shows on their iPad apps for more than a year, Zigler says NBC “wanted to understand the business model mechanism” of the iPad before it moved forward.  Before Thursday’s upgrade, the app featured short clips from the network, but not full episodes. The new app also offers customization features that let you follow a show and have it automatically update in the app, rather than having to search for a new episode

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NBC, ABC create own iPad apps as Viacom battles Cablevision, TWC

While Viacom (NYSE: VIA) battles Cablevision (NYSE: CVC) and Time Warner Cable (NYSE: TWC) over those MSOs' efforts to deliver Viacom programming via Apple's (Nasdaq: AAPL) iPad device, NBC and ABC have launched their own iPad apps--although neither app focuses on live streaming TV.
NBC Live offers second-screen social features and interactivity that syncs with shows being televised and ABC Video Bookstore packages archived news footage with photo galleries and interactive timelines. Both applications are now live on Apple's App Store, and are free to download (consumers can make use of ABC's in-app payments to buy individual video books).
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London 2012 — NBC Signup Needed to Stream Olympics

London 2012 — NBC Signup Needed to Stream Olympics | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

This edition of the Summer Games promises to be different from past Olympics, and it might be a real boon for viewers. Every stream from every sport from London will be live. There will be no dilly-dallying as there was two years ago at the Vancouver Winter Games when NBC streamed only hockey and curling live on its site. But as usual, the opening and closing ceremonies will be tape-delayed until prime time. In all, there will be 3,500 hours of live streaming video. Few will watch them all (is it possible, I wonder?), but they will be there. Still, whatever you watch, at whatever time, you will want to be able to dip into it without encountering any access problems. “Sure, we have fears that people who are asked to take an action, to click for access, are going to be deterred,” said Gary Zenkel, the president of NBC Olympics. “We learned two years ago that the consumer needs more education.” He said customers have, over that time, learned to verify their accounts for other content.

“A portion of the population is getting comfortable,” he added.

Verification (or authorization) should be easy and quick. It looks simple in the short demonstration video starring Carson Daly that NBC has sent to cable, satellite and telephone company providers: Go to nbcolympics.com /LiveExtra. From a drop-down menu, choose the cable, satellite or telephone company you have an account with. The next step depends on where you subscribe (and if you’re on a digital tier that includes MSNBC and CNBC, which is nearly everyone’s). Generally, you will have to enter the user name and password that corresponds to your account to verify your computer, mobile device or tablet. If all works well, you will never have to verify again. But Comcast and Cablevision have developed ways to speed the process. When Comcast Xfinity and Cablevision Optimum broadband customers identify themselves on the NBC Olympic site from their home computers, their accounts will be recognized and automatically verified without the entering of user names and passwords. “We wanted to create a frictionless environment and remove obstacles to let them get to the Olympic content,” said Amalia O’Sullivan, Cablevision’s vice president for broadband product operations. “We know that for a very condensed period time, and for a broad base of customers, there would be great interest in this product.”...

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At London Olympics, NBC Says, 'If Cameras Are on It, We'll Stream It'

At London Olympics, NBC Says, 'If Cameras Are on It, We'll Stream It' | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

All 32 sports at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London will be streamed live at nbcolympics.com.  “The hot topic is always, ‘Why don’t you show all your sports live?’” said Rick Cordella, vice president and general manager of NBC Sports Digital Media. “We wanted to take care of that.”  But in reversing a previous policy that did not fully embrace live streaming — the formal announcement will be made Wednesday — there will be a wrinkle to provide a measure of protection for the segment of NBC’s Olympic coverage that is still its most critical: the prime-time broadcast.  An important event like a gold-medal race involving Michael Phelps will be streamed live on nbcolympics.com, but will not be archived on the Web site until sometime after the prime-time show. Other staples of NBC’s prime-time coverage — including swimming, diving, gymnastics, track and field, and beach volleyball — will be treated the same way.  Even so, Mr. Cordella said, “The vast majority of events will be archived immediately.”

The live streaming of every event is a major shift at the NBC Sports Group, which was formed after Comcast acquired control of NBC Universal. Under General Electric, its former owner, NBC Sports did not stream live events that would be featured in prime time, lest they diminish ratings.  Two years ago, at the Winter Olympics in Vancouver, only hockey and curling were streamed live in order to protect prime time. At the 2008 Beijing Summer Games, 25 sports were streamed live but none of them were important to the evening broadcast, which is usually at least four hours long.

“The way consumers consume video has changed over the years,” Mr. Cordella said. “We can’t go back with hindsight and say we were wrong.”

He said that NBC had data to show that live streaming could increase viewership of a event shown hours later on delay. “We’re not scared of cannibalization,” Mr. Cordella said, adding, “Anytime you have a great event that happens before it shows on the air, it increases ratings and generates buzz.”
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What NBC has learned from its second-screen app

What NBC has learned from its second-screen app | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it

Just in time for the fall premiere season, NBC has pushed fresh updates for two of its iPad apps. The main NBC app (below) now features full-episode streaming, and the NBC Live second-screen app picked up some new social features.  We spoke with Vivi Zigler, president, NBCUniversal Digital Entertainment, about the refreshed apps. “The timing felt right to us,” she said about waiting until now to launch full episodes, noting that the fall season is right around the corner. “We wanted to make sure we were rock solid on the technology.” As for whether NBC is considering TV Anywhere authentication like Fox, “at this point, it’s not part of the plan,” she said, explaining that NBCU’s distribution arm has been examining that approach.

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Comcast's Over-the-Top Dilemma

Comcast executives are talking about the possibility of using Internet video to sell programming to subscribers outside its cable footprint, Senior Vice President of Video Distribution Mark Hess said here Wednesday. But talking about doing something and actually doing it are two entirely different things, of course. Hess suggested there are competing forces at Comcast that could influence its decision on whether or not to go out-of-network to sell video service subscriptions in territories controlled by fellow cable MSOs such as Time Warner Cable Inc. (NYSE: TWC), Cox Communications Inc. and Charter Communications Inc.
While its programming arm, which now includes NBCUniversal LLC , could benefit from an over-the-top (OTT) play, Comcast's cable operation is focused on selling a triple play of video, high-speed data and voice to subscribers within its own franchise areas, he said. "As a content company, we think about it," Hess said. "It's something we talk about at meetings."
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Secure, synchronized, social TV

Secure, synchronized, social TV | TV Everywhere | Scoop.it
A technique called network coding could protect users’ privacy and providers’ content while making communications networks more efficient. Network coding is an innovative new approach to network design that promises much more efficient use of bandwidth, and MIT researchers have made seminal contributions to its development. But in recent work, some of those researchers have concentrated on a different application of the same technology: secure communication. Media companies have shown interest in the new work as a means of simultaneously protecting their content and their customers’ privacy.
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